Maori health promotion

Training manual to enhance resource

Plans are underway to develop a training manual from a Te Tiriti-based health promotion resource that has been well received by health promoters.

Dr Heather Came who is one of the authors of Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion says the manual is currently in development with another of the booklet’s authors, Dr Nicole Coupe leading the work.

“We need to regroup and talk about it but the intention is that we are keen to find folk willing to extend the reach of the resource,” says Dr Came, who has worked for nearly 25 years in health promotion, public and Māori health and has had a long involvement in social justice activism.

Aimed at the health promotion workforce, the free resource which is published by STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) was launched in Auckland on January 28 this year and is available online and in print. It builds on the legacy of Dr Irihapeti Ramsden and cultural safety in nursing.

Dr Came, who is a senior lecturer based in the Taupua Waiora Māori  Health Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology says they have had feedback that the resource is useful and academics have been using it as a teaching tool.

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi … if you’re following the treaty than you’re not practising racism,” she said.

“It’s a smorgasbord of ideas about how to implement te Tiriti in your practice.”

Dr Came says however that the debate over te Tiriti continues to evolve as evidenced by the Waitangi Tribunal’s finding in 2014 that Ngapuhi did not cede their sovereignty when they signed te Tiriti in 1840.

 

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi.”

Dr Heather Came

 

“So the intention was to add to and strengthen the resource every five years as things continue to evolve,” she explains.

Although the resource is written for practitioners, teachers and those working in the health promotion field Dr Came believes it would be of interest to people outside the sector, as well as a Tau Iwi audience.

Well-known and respected Māori activist and lawyer from Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Porou specialising in Treaty and constitutional issues, Moana Jackson says in the booklet’s foreword it is appropriate that the resource is dedicated to Dr Irihapeti Ramsden.

“As a nurse and deep-thinking philosopher she was committed to finding practical ways to give effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi; especially in health,” says Mr Jackson.

“Her promotion of the concept of cultural safety in nursing recognised the power dynamics at play in any relationship between health professionals and those in their care. In a very real sense it was based in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and was thus a recognition that the Tiriti-Treaty relationship is also about power.”

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved … and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

Moana Jackson

Mr Jackson said the resource built upon that recognition and in a carefully considered and practical way offers guidance for all who work in the health sector to manage and develop their Treaty-based practice in ways that recognise the power relationships it enshrines.

He acknowledged that the resource was timely as it reflected the evolving understanding of te Tiriti that has occurred since the 1970s.

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved in compiling and editing this resource and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

STIR is a group of senior public health practitioners and activist researchers who aim to end racism in the public health sector.

Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director of The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), one of the supporters of the resource, said “we are proud to be party to the development of this resource because te Tiriti and the Ottawa Charter are the two documents upon which health promotion is based in New Zealand”.

“Māori health promotion contributes, among other things, indigenous opportunities, values and tools to health promotion which enrich our understanding of health promotion in New Zealand and the rest of the world.”

Deputy Executive Director of HPF, Trevor Simpson, whose interests are in raising the profile of Māori issues particularly in the areas of health and matters of social importance, is one of the authors of the resource.

The other authors are: Grant Berghan, Claire Doole, Dr Jonathan Fay and Dr Tim McCreanor.

More about Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion

The resource which is inspired by activist scholarship and explores the ways in which senior health promoters work with the articles of te Tiriti and its aspirations starts by outlining the importance of te Tiriti to health promotion practice in Aotearoa. It then sets out the research method on which this resource is based, and from which deeper engagement is advocated with te Tiriti-based practice, anti-racism and decolonisation.

“We locate te Tiriti as a sequel to Her Wakaputanga o Nu Tireni (the Declaration of Independence). We next orient readers to each of the articles of the Maori text of te Tiriti as it relates to health promotion in Aotearoa … Under each article of te Tiriti we introduce relevant research, information from this study and insights from the authors’ experiences related to te Tiriti. The final section draws out the core elements of Tiriti-based practice,” write the authors.