Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Runanga Whakapiki Ake i te Hauora o Aotearoa
Diet, Family and child

Action to reduce New Zealand’s alarming childhood obesity rate needs to focus on the physical and social environments we live in, says the New Zealand College of Public Health Medicine.

A third of all Kiwi children are now overweight or obese, which the College says “must be urgently addressed to improve their current and future health”.

“Interventions at an individual level alone are unlikely to be successful in the long term,” says the president-elect of the College, Dr Felicity Dumble.

“We need to adapt our environment and change our social norms so that it’s easier for our children to establish and maintain a healthy weight.”

The College recently released a policy statement addressing childhood obesity; the policy recognised the issue as a significant public health challenge.

Dr Dumble says the College recognises the government’s commitment to addressing childhood obesity, but says New Zealand’s childhood obesity plan should be reviewed and amended as a matter of urgency, to fully reflect the World Health Organization’s (WHO) report titled Ending Childhood Obesity.

“If all of our nation’s children are to be healthy there must be a higher priority placed on addressing the issues causing childhood obesity,” she says.

The WHO Report was released earlier this year, stating no single intervention can halt the “rise of the growing obesity epidemic”.

It says that preventing and treating obesity requires a government-wide approach, in which policies across all sectors take health into account, avoid harmful impacts and thus improve population health and health equity.

In line with the WHO report, Dr Dumble says the College strongly supports three strategic objectives to help reduce childhood obesity in New Zealand;

• Tackle the obesogenic environment and norms

• Reduce the risk of obesity by addressing critical elements in the life course

• Treat children who are obese to improve their current and future health.

0

Case Studies, Community, Family and child

Plunket’s Asian strategy is expected to be implemented in July 2015.  The strategy addresses all  levels of the organisation, including the staff, volunteer groups and Plunket Line;  aiming to increase customers’ access to-, use of-, and satisfaction with Plunket’s services.

Plunket is developing culturally appropriate professional services, and encouraging ongoing feedback from service users about their work.  They will set and update yearly goals; ensuring the inclusion of the Asian service-user’s voice in their business planning and strategies.

The new strategy follows extensive research commissioned by Plunket  in 2013.  Conducted among their service users, staff and stakeholders; the research  investigated Asian mothers’ experience of access to health care. It included interviews, consultations and focus groups held with Chinese, Korean and Burmese mothers as well as members of The Asian Network Incorporated (TANI), and Plunket’s internal staff.   The results indicated that Asian mothers were not proactively seeking help, despite the superficial appearance that access to the services was good. At the time only 4% of the Plunket staff were of Asian ethnicity, while 15% of babies among the service users were of Asian descent.  Mothers spoke of access barriers to service, including language barriers and lack of understanding of available services.

It found that Asian mothers mainly accessed Plunket information via the internet and from their GP and concluded that it was important to provide more information about the culturally appropriate services available from Plunket.

For more information, please contact Vivian Cheung on 021 246 3398 orvivian.cheung@plunket.org.nz

0

Family and child, Policy

The first 1000 days of a child’s life are critical to their long term development. One thousand days is also approximately the duration of one term of parliament. So either way we have about 1000 days to get it right. The future of New Zealand depends on it.”

 

Getting it right in those first thousand days means today’s young children are given every opportunity to develop their full potential as healthy, emotionally mature, socially engaged and well-educated, productive adults.”

 

Read the 2011 report from Every Child Counts.

0

Family and child

The 2014 Child Poverty Monitor released this month shows that reducing child poverty will require bold and sustained commitment from government.

Child Poverty Action Group welcomes the latest Child Poverty Monitor and congratulates the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the JR McKenzie Trust and the University of Otago’s NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service on their commitment to measuring and monitoring child poverty.

 

The Monitor brings together all the known statistics about child poverty in Aotearoa New Zealand with current statistics on health outcomes.

 

CPAG health spokesperson Dr Nikki Turner says, “The 2014 Child Poverty Monitor shows there has been little change over the past year and far too many New Zealand children still live in poverty.  This problem is too difficult to be addressed by piecemeal measures – substantial commitment is needed to improve incomes and housing for families with children.”

 

Nikki Turner says, “We know childhood poverty has life-long consequences for people’s health and well-being.  For children to stay healthy, families need enough money for affordable, decent and stable housing, nutritious food, doctor’s visits and prescription fees.  They need cooking and laundry facilities, access to hot water, soap, clean towels, clothing, shoes, bedding and basic first aid.   Income adequacy is pivotal and insufficient money continues to affect children’s health, as the statistics in the Child Poverty Monitor show.  There are a range of issues to be tackled and some progress is being made, such as the reduction in costs for GP visits, but income adequacy is an urgent need, particularly for our most vulnerable children.”

 

Child Poverty Action Groups calls on the government to lead a cross-party agreement on an action plan to reduce child poverty, including:

•    Treating all low-income children equally.

•    Improving incomes significantly for low income families and access to affordable housing and healthcare for all children

•    Ensuring an accelerated rate of poverty reduction for Mäori and Pasifika, so they achieve equity with other children.

•    Introducing child poverty legislation to ensure proper, regular measurement of child poverty on a range of measures. In addition, targets and timelines for child poverty reduction should be set with annual reporting to Parliament on progress towards these targets by the responsible Minister.

 

screen_shot_2015-05-02_at_7-06-16_pm

 

Child Poverty Action Group

8 December 2014

0

The 2014 Child Poverty Monitor released this month shows that reducing child poverty will require bold and sustained commitment from government.

Child Poverty Action Group welcomes the latest Child Poverty Monitor and congratulates the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the JR McKenzie Trust and the University of Otago’s NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service on their commitment to measuring and monitoring child poverty.

The Monitor brings together all the known statistics about child poverty in Aotearoa New Zealand with current statistics on health outcomes.

CPAG health spokesperson Dr Nikki Turner says, “The 2014 Child Poverty Monitor shows there has been little change over the past year and far too many New Zealand children still live in poverty.  This problem is too difficult to be addressed by piecemeal measures – substantial commitment is needed to improve incomes and housing for families with children.”

Nikki Turner says, “We know childhood poverty has life-long consequences for people’s health and well-being.  For children to stay healthy, families need enough money for affordable, decent and stable housing, nutritious food, doctor’s visits and prescription fees.  They need cooking and laundry facilities, access to hot water, soap, clean towels, clothing, shoes, bedding and basic first aid.   Income adequacy is pivotal and insufficient money continues to affect children’s health, as the statistics in the Child Poverty Monitor show.  There are a range of issues to be tackled and some progress is being made, such as the reduction in costs for GP visits, but income adequacy is an urgent need, particularly for our most vulnerable children.”

Child Poverty Action Groups calls on the government to lead a cross-party agreement on an action plan to reduce child poverty, including:

•    Treating all low-income children equally.

•    Improving incomes significantly for low income families and access to affordable housing and healthcare for all children

•    Ensuring an accelerated rate of poverty reduction for Mäori and Pasifika, so they

achieve equity with other children.

•    Introducing child poverty legislation to ensure proper, regular measurement of child poverty on a range of measures. In addition, targets and timelines for child poverty reduction should be set with annual reporting to Parliament on progress towards these targets by the responsible Minister.

 

0

Equality, Family and child, News

Child Poverty Action Group’s Associate Professor Susan St John has decried the Working for Families scheme and called for the correction of “the moral bankruptcy of a social security tax-funded payment for children that deliberately excludes the poorest children….”  This follows the discovery of a data error at Statistics New Zealand, which led to an underestimate of the number of families living below the poverty line.

The new figures released from the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) on 27 February reveal a worse household income situation than previously thought for Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

 

It is clear, from the revised statistics, that the Global Financial Crisis had a greater impact in 2009 on the incomes of lower-income households than originally thought. The 2011/12 figure for children living below the poverty line has been revised to 150,000 from the original 125,000.   The number of children estimated to be living below the very low income line during this period has been revised to 285,000 from 265,000.

“This is a huge indictment of the failure of government policies to protect the poorest children in a recession.” Her blog on the subject goes on to quote the Court of Appeal’s finding in 2013 that the Work Tax Credit policy discriminated “with harmful effect” against 230,000 of New Zealand’s poorest children.”

 

0

Diet, Family and child, HP, News, Policy

mid section view of a man sitting on a bench in a park --- Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

 

In an article in Public Health Monitor on 7 February, Prof Boyd Swinburn* took a look at the Australian initiative that has informed the Government’s proposed Healthy Families NZ initiative. His conclusion was that it could work, as long as the initiative is culturally-centred and backed with government policy and regulation.

 

HPF welcomes the Government’s proposed health promotion approach to obesity.  Like Prof Swinburn, we believe it will be essential to back the initiative with policy, regulation and the close involvement of the Māori and Pacific communities.

 

The initiative has been proposed by the Government to address obesity in New Zealand.  Modelled on Australia’s Healthy Together Victoria (HTV) programme, Health Families NZ  is expected to take a large-scale, community-based health promotion approach.  Little more is known about the New Zealand initiative at this stage, but health promoters and public health professionals anticipate it eagerly … with some words of advice for the government.

 

Health Promotion Forum (HPF) agrees.  “We have some great models to refer to in New Zealand,” says the Forum’s Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi. “Healthy Together Victoria is a wonderful initiative and will provide another dimension to the work that has already taken place here.”  Sione and his team believe the following will be essential to the success of the initiative:

 

  • Involve our Māori and Pacific communities.  Marry the Healthy Families NZ initiative with the successful Whanau Ora approach already running in Aotearoa New Zealand.  The success of Whanau Ora is based on self-determination.  Founded on the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi, this model provides a template for success that translates across health promotion programmes for this country.

 

  • Revisit the Healthy Eating, Healthy Action programme (HEHA) to identify existing resources, experience and knowledge avoid ‘reinventing the wheel’.

 

  • Take a ‘top-down, bottom-up’ approach.  Community-based health promotion (‘bottom up’) needs support with policy and the regulation (‘top down’) of industries that impact on health, such as the food and leisure industries.

*Boyd Swinburn is Professor of Population Nutrition and Global Health, University of Auckland and Co-Director, WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University.

 

 

Jo Lawrence-King

 

0

Family and child, Global, Maori, What is HP

tariana-turia

 

A speech to parliament on Wednesday 28 January 2014 by Minister Tariana Turia has highlighted the groundswell of support for Whanau Ora as a model for health and wellbeing applicable to all New Zealanders.  Health Promotion Forum (HPF) Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi believes that the model goes even further; with relevance to people around the world.

 

Whanau Ora [……] has been openly embraced by New Zealanders of all cultures and creeds,” said Ms Turia in her speech “[It is] about empowering and enabling families to set their own priorities, to focus on outcomes.”  According to Ms Turia 160 providers are now using the Whanau Ora tool, with approximately 33,000 New Zealanders benefitting from the approach.  Ms Turia is not alone in seeing the value of community health promotion, with Minister of Health Hon Tony Ryall reportedly considering funding for such a programme.

 

Ms Turia is not alone in seeing the value of community health promotion, with Minister of Health Hon Tony Ryall reportedly considering funding for such a programme. – See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/whanau-ora-a-model-for-people-around-the-world.html#sthash.eWk0Ul5D.dpuf
Ms Turia is not alone in seeing the value of community health promotion, with Minister of Health Hon Tony Ryall reportedly considering funding for such a programme. – See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/whanau-ora-a-model-for-people-around-the-world.html#sthash.eWk0Ul5D.dpuf

 

 

Tu’itahi welcomed Ms Turia’s speech and Mr Ryall’s interest in community health programmes.  “We are rapidly moving from a model of hauora (health and wellbeing) by and for Māori to one that is widely recognised as being of value to all peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand,” he said.  “I predict that it won’t stop there: this will become a model followed by peoples across the globe.”

 

Aotearoa New Zealand – and HPF –  are highly regarded internationally.  In particular our approaches to indigenous health promotion were well-received at last year’s International Union of Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) conference. Key elements of these approaches include a focus on the holistic view of health and wellbeing, increased control by communities over interventions and incorporating indigenous world views into health promotion planning. All of these aspects are reflected in the Whanau Ora approach.

 

Whanau Ora is founded on the principle of self-determination.  Unlike the conventional models of health care, the Whanau Ora approach empowers whanau and communities to have control over their own wellbeing.  Instead of focussing on illness and its treatment, Whanau Ora helps participants identify those elements that determine hauora and to prioritise strategies to improve outcomes.

 

“This is not an exclusively indigenous issue,” says Tu’itahi.  “There is a broad movement towards self-determination – in health and many other issues.  People around the world are taking an increasing interest in being well, rather than treating illness; on looking at the big picture of what affects our ability to fulfil our potential and doing something to address those determinants of our health.”   He believes that the Whanau Ora model will be one that is taken up and adapted for people around the world.  “Once again New Zealand will be a pioneer,” he said.  “Perhaps what we do need to recognise is that we owe Māori a debt of gratitude for a model that has the potential to revolutionise the hauora of people around the world.”

 

Visit the Government’s web-page about Whanau Ora.

 

Jo Lawrence-King

0

Family and child
Children’s Commissioner: “Prioritise child poverty in 2014 elections”

Children’s Commissioner Dr Russell Wills has called for child poverty to be a key issue in the elections of 2014.  In an opinion piece in the NZ Herald, he has suggested that the public will need to make some ‘tough decisions’ to put child poverty high on the agenda.  “We will need to send clear messages to decision makers about our priorities,” he said.

 

 

Dr Wills suggested that it is voters and influential organisations who must throw their support behind his call, in order to influence all parties to prioritise this issue.  “…no government will go further than the public mood will allow,” he said  “… as the debates around election year start to heat up, what will your contribution be? Will you leave the tough choices to the politicians, or will you stand up in your own organisations and ask: what can we do to prioritise children in this election year?”

 

HPF Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi welcomed Dr Wills’ article.  “Child poverty is the root cause of so much ill-health in Aotearoa New Zealand,” he said.  “An investment in this tragic situation would go a long way to improve the wellbeing of a large sector of our society.”

 

Dr Wills’ article directed his challenge at older people, motorists and health managers; asking them to call for greater prioritisation of child poverty.  Acommentary in the same paper provides responses from the Automobile Association, Grey Power, Social Development Minister Paula Bennett and Labour children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ahern; the latter of whom offered assurances that Labour would prioritise child poverty.

 

HPF has reported on the the Child Poverty Monitor, released on 9 December 2013, which revealed that a quarter of New Zealand children currently live in poverty.

 

Visit our Children and Young People page to read more on this topic.

 

Pictured: Dr Russell Wills with a young patient (photo: www.BayBuzz.co.nz)

 

Jo Lawrence-King

0

Family and child, News

sad-boy-photo-from-stock-xchng

 

The release, on Monday 9 December, of the first annual monitor of child poverty shows that one in four children in Aotearoa New Zealand live in income poverty.  One in six live without basic essentials like fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, decent shoes and visits to the doctor.

 

It has long been known that child poverty creates life-long health issues.

 

According to Iain Hines, Executive Director of the J R McKenzie Trust child poverty today is twice that of the 1980s.  “If New Zealand’s road toll was twice that of the ‘80s ther would be outrage and immediate action taken to reduce it.  We need the same momentum and action on child poverty.”

 

Children’s Commissioner Dr Russell Wills says the project is about giving New Zealanders the full picture on child poverty and to get New Zealanders talking about it.  “Child poverty hurts all of us. It harms the individual child and it has substantial long-term costs to society. If we want to be a thriving, progressive and successful country – we’re not going to get there with 25 percent of our kids in poverty,” he says.

 

The Child Poverty Monitor is a joint project by the Children’s Commissioner, J R McKenzie Trust and Otago University’s NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES). For the next five years it will publish four measures of child poverty: income poverty, material hardship, severe poverty and persistent poverty. The initiative aims to raise awareness of the problem and monitor New Zealand’s progress in reducing each of these measures.

 

The Monitor is supported by an extensive technical report.

 

More information on child poverty and health can be found in our Children and Young People section.

 

Key findings of the Child Poverty Monitor 2013:

Income poverty: 265,000 children (one in four). This looks at the amount of money families have to pay bills and purchase everyday essentials. This is defined as having less than 60% of median household income, after housing costs are removed.

 

Material hardship: 180,000 children (17%). This means regularly going without things most New Zealanders consider essential – like fruit and vegetables, shoes that fit, their own bed and a warm house.

 

Severe poverty: 10% of children. This means they are going without the things they need and their low family income means they don’t have any opportunity of changing this. These are the children experiencing material hardship and who are in families in income poverty.

 

Persistent poverty: 3 out of 5 children in poverty are in poverty for long periods. These children are likely to live in poverty for many years of their childhoods. Persistent poverty is defined as having lived in income poverty over a seven year period.

 

Visit our Children and Young People section to read more, including reports from the Children’s Commissioner and a report from the Public Health Advisory committee.

 

Published: 10 December 2013

Jo Lawrence-King

 

0

The release, on Monday 9 December, of the first annual monitor of child poverty shows that one in four children* in Aotearoa New Zealand live in income poverty.  One in six live without basic essentials like fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, decent shoes and visits to the doctor.

It has long been known that child poverty creates life-long health issues.

According to Iain Hines, Executive Director of the J R McKenzie Trust child poverty today is twice that of the 1980s.  “If New Zealand’s road toll was twice that of the ‘80s ther would be outrage and immediate action taken to reduce it.  We need the same momentum and action on child poverty.”

Children’s Commissioner Dr Russell Wills says the project is about giving New Zealanders the full picture on child poverty and to get New Zealanders talking about it.  “Child poverty hurts all of us. It harms the individual child and it has substantial long-term costs to society. If we want to be a thriving, progressive and successful country – we’re not going to get there with 25 percent of our kids in poverty,” he says.

The Child Poverty Monitor is a joint project by the Children’s Commissioner, J R McKenzie Trust and Otago University’s NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES). For the next five years it will publish four measures of child poverty: income poverty, material hardship, severe poverty and persistent poverty. The initiative aims to raise awareness of the problem and monitor New Zealand’s progress in reducing each of these measures.

The Monitor is supported by an extensive technical report.

 

More information on child poverty and health can be found in our Children and Young People section.

 

Key findings of the Child Poverty Monitor 2013:

Income poverty: 265,000 children (one in four)*. This looks at the amount of money families have to pay bills and purchase everyday essentials. This is defined as having less than 60% of median household income, after housing costs are removed.

Material hardship: 180,000 children (17%). This means regularly going without things most New Zealanders consider essential – like fruit and vegetables, shoes that fit, their own bed and a warm house.

Severe poverty: 10% of children. This means they are going without the things they need and their low family income means they don’t have any opportunity of changing this. These are the children experiencing material hardship and who are in families in income poverty.

Persistent poverty: 3 out of 5 children in poverty are in poverty for long periods. These children are likely to live in poverty for many years of their childhoods. Persistent poverty is defined as having lived in income poverty over a seven year period.

Visit our Children and Young People section to read more, including reports from the Children’s Commissioner and a report from the Public Health Advisory committee.

 

* Following the discovery of a data error at Statistics New Zealand and Treasury, these figures have now been revised: Income poverty is now recognised as affecting 285,000 children.  Read more about this error.

 

 

 

 

Published: 10 December 2013

Jo Lawrence-King

0

Family and child, Women

trevor-simpson-white-ribbon-amb-cropped

 

HPF Deputy Executive Director and White Ribbon Ambassador Trevor Simpson joined the call this month to New Zealanders to take the White Ribbon Pledge.  In the Pledge men agree never to commit, condone or remain silent about violence towards women. “Show your respect for women;” he said.  “Speak out against any form of violence towards them; physical, emotional, verbal or sexual.”

The recent Roast Busters story has caused a public outcry over the issue of sexual violence by men against women and girls in this country.  White Ribbon chairman Judge Peter Boshier lamented the misogyny that he says permeates Aotearoa New Zealand.  “These attitudes are epidemic in our country,” he said. The White Ribbon Campaign pledge seeks to engage support from the broader New Zealand community in addressing this serious issue.

Trevor is proud to be entering his third year as White Ribbon Ambassador.  At the time of his appointment, in November 2011, he said “I believe that White Ribbon ambassadors and men who get involved symbolise ‘nurturing warriors’ who together spread peaceful and powerful messages within their communities. They show other men how to be protectors and providers for their families, and above all how to do it in a non-violent manner”.

Take the Pledge.

 

Item published: 11 November 2013

Jo Lawrence-King

 

0

Equality, Family and child, Maori

 

 

Inquiry into the determinants of wellbeing for tamariki Māori.

 

A report, issued in December 2013 by the Māori Affairs Committee, concludes that poverty is a major barrier to the wellbeing of tamariki Māori.  The authors call on all New Zealanders to support the work being done to improve the wellbeing of our tamariki, and New Zealand as a whole.  They encourage a collaborative approach between agencies and organisations to support the Whānau Ora – and similar – approach to working with Māori whānau.  They unambiguously reject a silo mentality.

 

0

Family and child, News

Children’s health disparities require urgent action

 

“The large health disparities in the health status of New Zealand children, which have led to an alarming number of hospital admissions for a range of preventable illnesses, must be urgently addressed says the New Zealand Medical Association (NZMA) in response to this year’s Children’s Social Health Monitor report.”

 

Read the press release: From the New Zealand Medical Association 29 August 2011
Content sourced from www.scoop.co.nz

 

Key Points Emerging from the Children’s Social Health Monitor 
“…. the overall picture painted by the 2011 Children’s Social Health Monitor remains concerning, with one in five (20%) New Zealand children being reliant on Government Benefits as the main source of their family’s income, and the 2008 Living Standards Survey suggesting that these benefits may inadequately protect them from exposure to material hardship (e.g. having to wear worn out shoes or clothing, sharing a bed, cutting back on fresh fruit and vegetables, and postponing doctors visits because of cost). Further, while the increases in hospital admissions for medical conditions with a social gradient seen during 2007–2009 were less steep in 2009–2010 (and for Pacific children may be beginning to taper off), large social gradients persist for many conditions (e.g. hospital admission for injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children are 5.6 times higher for those living in the most deprived (NZDep Index decile 9–10) areas, and mortality from sudden unexpected death in infancy is 7.4 times higher). Key Points
Go to Children and Young People for more information and opinions.

 

0

Publications

The Ministry of Health has an extensive collection of publications about child health in New Zealand These include the 1998 Child HealthStrategy.
Child health publications

Influences in Childhood on the Development of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes in Adulthood: An Occasional Paper (2005)

This paper examines the medical literature on the childhood determinants which correlate to adulthood diabetes and cardiovascular disease in an effort to inform policy decisions and program implementation in the health sector. It also provides important information for health practitioners who are striving reduce the chronic disease trends for adults in NZ.
Influences in Childhood

Health Eating Healthy Action: Strategic Framework (2003)

This strategy calls for a more integrated and multi-sectoral approach to addressing nutrition, physical activity and obesity, and highlights the importance of both individual behaviour and our environment.
Strategic Framework

0

Family and child, Policy
Children and Young People: Indicators of Wellbeing in New Zealand 2008

This the second indicator report published by MSD highlighting indicators of social well-being of children and young people, how these have changed and the status of health for different child and youth groups in the current population. MSD has utilized the findings from this report to advise the UNCROC report to be submitted to the United Nations.
Summary of findings
Full Report

 

Raising Children in New Zealand: The Influence of Parental Income on Children’s Outcomes

This report examines the impact parental income has on many child outcomes including health and well-being. By focusing on the correlation between net family income and child outcomes this report contributes in advising public policy on income support.
Influence of Parental Income

 

The Social Report 2010: Indicators of Social Well-being in New Zealand

This site provides in-depth information on the social health and well-being status of New Zealand society, through the use of indicators to monitor trends over time and to make global comparisons. The site also contains the full 2008 Social report and areas dedicated to the different indicators.
The Social Report 2010

0

Family and child
Where Health Begins

‘New Zealand’s child health outcomes compare poorly internationally. In a 2009 report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD 2009), Doing Better for Children, New Zealand ranked 29th out of 30 countries for child health and safety. In fact, some of New Zealand’s disease patterns among children are closer to those of developing countries’ (PHAC, 2010). What can advocates, clinicians, policy-makers and researchers do to strengthen the promotion of child health in New Zealand?

 

This was the topic of a workshop of key stakeholders hosted by the Health Promotion and Policy Research Unit, University of Otago, Wellington. 28 October 2010
Power point presentation

0

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
ErrorHere