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Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Runanga Whakapiki Ake i te Hauora o Aotearoa
Competencies, News

University of Otago, Wellington, invites you to participate in a short course at its February 2017 Public Health Summer School.

Thirty courses, lasting anything from one to three days, will take place between 7 and 24 February at the University’s School of Medicine in Wellington.

A 25% early bird discount is currently in place.  This will automatically be discounted off the fee if you register on or before 21 December.  Many courses have limited numbers, so the University is encouraging those interested to register soon.

To register or find out more, visit the University’s Summer School website 

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16 November 2016

Jo Lawrence-King

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Competencies, News, What is HP

A Master’s Degree dissertation by HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist Karen Hicks has upheld the widely held view that  the 2012 New Zealand Health Promotion Competencies (HPC2012) are unique in the world, due to their central inclusion of indigenous Māori perspectives.  This central positioning of Māori results in a framework that is an effective capacity-development tool to improve Māori health and reduce inequities.

 

Findings from Karen’s qualitative research confirmed that the HPC2012 provides an example of best practice that is values-driven and inclusive. Karen’s analysis showed that the process’ cultural-sensitivity was made possible by the:

 

a)      weaving of Māori tikanga values throughout the development phase.

b)      inclusion of grassroots workers – the backbone of the health promotion workforce – in the development process for the competencies.

c)       provision of adequate time to meaningfully consult with Māori.

 

Karen used a two-fold methodology for her research, including the comparative analysis of secondary data from four international health promotion competency frameworks and analysis of primary data obtained from interviews with New Zealand health promotion public health leaders.

 

 

The HPC2012 is the second version of the competencies; the first having been published in 2000.   The rigorous review and wide consultation with Māori was a response to feedback that identified inadequate consultation with the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand as a shortcoming of the first version.

The current competencies were recently recognised by the International Union of Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) as equivalent to their own European Health Promotion Competencies.  See article.

 

 

 

16 March 2016

Jo Lawrence-King

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Competencies, What is HP

From 16 April, the Health Promotion Forum is excited to offer an online course, introducing the social determinants of health: a foundation stone for the understanding of health promotion.  This new mode of delivery will allow practitioners across Aotearoa New Zealand to continue their professional development in a convenient and inexpensive way.

Icons for education for all, distance education, training and tutorials

Icons for education for all, distance education, training and tutorials

“We are conscious that those working in remote locations do not always have the resource to travel to the main centres for training,” says HPF Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi.  “This approach supports flexible learning in your own home or workplace; 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.”

The course is a pilot of what is hoped to be a series of similar courses exploring and demystifying health promotion.  Social determinants of health are the underlying ‘causes of the causes’ of health and wellbeing.  They form a key foundation for the discipline and practice of health promotion.

With a level four education classification, the course is suitable for learners of all levels.  It is also relevant to a wide range of professionals, including those working in public and community health, social services, education and city and county councils.

The course will involve approximately six hours of study: this includes time to read background material and watch video clips, as well as fulfilling course work.  Registrations will remain open for just one month and participants will have 7 days from the date of their registration in which to complete it.

It is being offered in collaboration with CLAD Services, a New Zealand company that specialises in online solutions for training.  The course fees is $99.00, including GST.

 

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Competencies, Global, What is HP

The International Union of Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) has recently acknowledged the New Zealand Health Promotion Competencies as equivalent to its own European Competencies.  This is a promising step towards the ultimate aim of global competencies and accreditation; which would offer health promoters the potential to broaden employment opportunities and the exchange of knowledge and experience around the world.

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HPF’s Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi was excited about this significant step and its potential implications for health promoters of Aotearoa.  “Imagine when New Zealand health promoters can travel anywhere in the world and transfer their competencies to work in any member country,” he said.

The IUHPE has its own European-wide competencies; developed out of its CompHP project.  New Zealand was represented by past HPF Health Promotion Strategist Helen Rance on the Global Advisory Committee that developed these European competencies.  The IUHPE has also developed a European accreditation process to sit alongside the competencies.  It identifies performance criteria to meet the competencies. Within this process individual practitioners submit a portfolio of evidence rather like nursing; identifying their evidence in meeting each competency.  This submitted to their National Accreditation Organisation, which assesses the evidence successful accreditation means they can be called a European Health Promoter with the registration lasting three years. Academic institutions that deliver health promotion courses can also become accredited following a similar process.

Because the European and Aotearoa competencies were developed concurrently, the frameworks consist of the same nine competency domains.  The detail below each competency domain heading is different in the Aotearoa context, from that in the European domains as ours prioritise health promotion knowledge and practice that is specific to this country’s context.  In order to formalise the IUHPE recognition of the New Zealand Competencies, the HPF’s Health Promotion Strategists are providing the global body with detail around the correlation between the two competency documents.

Health Promotion Forum first produced the New Zealand Health Promotion Competencies in 2000 following two years of extensive consultation.  The current – 2012 – version of the Competencies was the result of continued discussions and feedback, which identified a need to strengthen the content and context related to Māori values and Te Tiriti o Waitangi.  These latest competencies identify the specific knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes for effective health promotion practices in the Aotearoa New Zealand context.

The decision to recognise the New Zealand competencies was made at a December 2015 meeting of the IUHPE Accreditation System meeting.

– See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/nz-health-promotion-competencies-recognised-by-global-body1.html#sthash.YquMnPTF.dpuf

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The International Union of Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) has recently acknowledged the New Zealand Health Promotion Competencies as equivalent to its own European Competencies.  This is a promising step towards the ultimate aim of global competencies and accreditation; which would offer health promoters the potential to broaden employment opportunities and the exchange of knowledge and experience around the world.

HPF’s Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi was excited about this significant step and its potential implications for health promoters of Aotearoa.  “Imagine when New Zealand health promoters can travel anywhere in the world and transfer their competencies to work in any member country,” he said.

The IUHPE has its own European-wide competencies; developed out of itsCompHP project.  New Zealand was represented by past HPF Health Promotion Strategist Helen Rance on the Global Advisory Committee that developed these European competencies.  The IUHPE has also developed a European accreditation process to sit alongside the competencies.  It identifies performance criteria to meet the competencies. Within this process individual practitioners submit a portfolio of evidence rather like nursing; identifying their evidence in meeting each competency.  This submitted to their National Accreditation Organisation, which assesses the evidence successful accreditation means they can be called a European Health Promoter with the registration lasting three years. Academic institutions that deliver health promotion courses can also become accredited following a similar process.

Because the European and Aotearoa competencies were developed concurrently, the frameworks consist of the same nine competency domains.  The detail below each competency domain heading is different in the Aotearoa context, from that in the European domains as ours prioritise health promotion knowledge and practice that is specific to this country’s context.  In order to formalise the IUHPE recognition of the New Zealand Competencies, the HPF’s Health Promotion Strategists are providing the global body with detail around the correlation between the two competency documents.

Health Promotion Forum first produced the New Zealand Health Promotion Competencies in 2000 following two years of extensive consultation.  The current – 2012 – version of the Competencies was the result of continued discussions and feedback, which identified a need to strengthen the content and context related to Māori values and Te Tiriti o Waitangi.  These latest competencies identify the specific knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes for effective health promotion practices in the Aotearoa New Zealand context.

The decision to recognise the New Zealand competencies was made at a December 2015 meeting of the IUHPE Accreditation System meeting.

 

 

 

 

9 March 2016

Jo Lawrence-King

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Effective co-ordination of primary care beyond treatment and prevention services to include comprehensive disease prevention and health promotion is central to the success of the Primary Health Care Strategy. To achieve effective health promotion in a PHO, public health and primary care practitioners will need to work together.
The purpose of this guide is to assist PHOs and DHBs develop, assess and deliver health promotion programmes aimed at improving the health status of the population and reducing health inequalities. A Guide to Developing Health Promotion Programmes

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Competencies, News

A recent evaluation of HPF’s Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion – often referred to as the ‘short course’ – has revealed that the course is highly valued by attendees and has had a positive effect not only on them but on their practice, their colleagues and, in many cases, their organisation.  Read more in our training section.   – See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/certificate-of-achievement-course-highly-valued-survey-results1.html#sthash.4vjgnBES.dpuf

 

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Competencies, Maori

 

 

Māori mental health patients are twice as likely as non-Māori to be put into seclusion.  Workforce development has been identified as one of the ways to address this disparity.

 

 

Seclusion means being placed in a locked, bare room alone. The person is monitored through a window and family members are kept away.  It is widely accepted that seclusion is not a legitimate form of treatment for escalating behaviour and can be highly distressing for the patient. The Ministry of Health reportedly has a plan to eliminate seclusion of Māori patients over five years.

 

In an interview on Radio New Zealand with Marion Blake, Chief Executive of The Platform Trust, said there are a number of possible reasons for the disparity, but there is no evidence to suggest Māori are any more violent than other people with mental illness.  She suggested one of the ways to tackle this disparity is workforce development – particularly in tikanga Māori.

 

Anne Brebner at health research organisation Te Pou says cultural issues aren’t on the top of everyone’s list of priorities when people seek treatment for mental health problems.

 

Health Promotion Forum offers workshops and courses to provide understanding Māori culture and health models.

 

The Platform Trust is a national mental health network of community organisations.

 

 

Find out about HPF’s training programmes:

  • A Treaty Understanding of Hauora in Aotearoa New Zealand (TUHANZ).  This is a practical, hands-on course, which explains how the articles of the Treaty can be applied to health promotion planning.
  • Working with the whanau ora tool  A practical guide to developing health programmes where Whanau, Hapu, Iwi and Māori communities play a leading role in achieving Whanau Ora.

 

  • Māori indigneity, whanau ora and the determinants of health.  Explores the link between Māori indigenous notions of health and wellbeing, the wider determinants of health and elements of whānau ora. As well as informing workplace practice this interactive workshop will provide an open platform for learning, sharing and personal development.
  • Māori concepts of health promotion.  Introduces participants to shared understandings of traditional Māori concepts, ideologies and practices in relation to health and wellbeing.

 

Story published 12 November 2013

Jo Lawrence-King

Photograph courtesy of Ophelia Cherry

 

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The Health Promotion Competencies 2012 provide a framework of values, knowledge and skills for health promotion practice in Aotearoa-New Zealand.

This latest version follows extensive consultation and revision of the original 2000 version.

 

Watch our video outlining the competencies; their scope, potential and how they can help you in your work.

 

Your questions answered

We have prepared answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about the Health Promotion Competencies.

 

Health Promotion competencies: Cancer Society self assessment template and guidelines

The Cancer Society has worked with HPF to produce a personal development plan for health promoters. They may be helpful to inform personal development reviews or appraisals; identifying an individual’s competencies and providing ideas for further development.

Feel free to download the template here.

 

Health promotion competencies: personal development review

Toi Te Ora in the Bay of Plenty DHB have given permission to HPF to share their personal development review blank template. This includes desired competencies for reference in a Health Promoter/Health Improvement Advisor’s personal development review.

Please feel free to contact Sharon Muru at Toi Te Ora if you would like to discuss how this template might be applied in your work setting.

 

Health Promotion Competencies survey reveals benefits to users

Users of the Health Promotion Competencies say that their role is clearer after referring to the document. They speak of greater clarity in job descriptions and performance development and say it helps them plan, implement and evaluate their health promotion activities.

These are just some of the findings of HPF’s survey in May 2013; examining how useful the document is and how its usefulness might be maximised. Read a summary of the findings here.

 

Generic competencies for public health in Aotearoa New Zealand

The Generic Competencies for Public Health provide a baseline set of competencies that is common to all public health roles across all public health sectors and disciplines. The Health Promotion Competencies sit on this base line. See the PHA website for the Generic Competencies (PDF) andkey documents about their development and implementation.

For more information please contact HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist Karen Hicks.

 

Developing a competent global health promotion workforce: pedagogy and practice – HPF occasional paper

“… with the UN Political Declaration on Non-Communicable Diseases in place as well as global momentum to utilise the Health in All policies approach (IUHPE, 2014), now is a crucial time for the HP community to unite, to share resources and to build upon advances made within our evolving discipline over the last 40 years,” says Caroline Hall, Research Fellow at the University of Brighton in her July 2014 paper for HPF.   “Fundamental to this process is accessing and harnessing opportunities to utilise inter-sectoral approaches and to build upon evidenced-based practices as a way of increasing capacity within the HP workforce. This should be combined with continued efforts to ensure the quality of these processes and practices, including increasing and recognising professional competence through recognised training and education pathways and which include ongoing workplace assessment.”  Read other occasional papers here

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“Advocacy for health: A combination of individual and social actions designed to gain political commitment, policy support, social acceptance and systems support for a particular health goal or programme. Advocacy can take many forms including the use of mass media and multimedia, direct political lobbying, and community mobilisation through, for example, coalitions of interest around defined issues.” Adapted from CompHP

Working with communities to participate in the submission process

This  guide helps communities have a voice in the submission process.  Produced by Regional Public Health, it gives advice and tips for health promoters on understanding the submission process, the health promoter’s role and how to engage with communities.

Help make children an election issue

Check out the election section on the Every Child Counts website. Links to reports, FaceBook and more advocacy information.www.everychildcounts.org.nz/news/

Advocacy in Action 1

A toolkit for Public Health Professionals from the Public Health Advocacy Institute of Australia
“It is recognised that not all organisations have staff dedicated to advocacy, and many public health professionals work in organisations with limited funding and find themselves responsible for many advocacy strategies
(e.g. media, political lobbying). This toolkit is designed to support health professionals in these positions
to engage in effective advocacy with confidence.” Advocacy in Action

Advocacy in Action 2

A resource kit for New Zealand from the Council for International Development. Covers everything from definitions to activities with a focus for NGOs Advocacy in Action

Advocacy Training

The Children’s Commissioner offers two advocacy training programmes to communities throughout New Zealand. Both of the programmes are organised and facilitated by trained and experienced staff from the Office of the Children’s Commissioner. To enquire about organising a training programme in your community, please visit their website. Advocacy Training

Advocacy tools

NCD Action NetworkNCD Action Network – Global action against the injustice of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Easy to use templates and advocacy tools. Links to other credible global health organisations with advocacy resourcesAdvocacy Tools

Amnesty International

Vision – A world in which every person – regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation or ethnicity – enjoys all of the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights standards. Ammnesty International

Health and Disability Advocacy

“If you want to know more about your rights when using health and disability services, get questions answered or make a complaint. Independent advocates offer education and training for anyone about consumer rights and provider duties. Health and Disability Advocates

PHA

The Public Health Association (PHA) of new Zealand is a voluntary association that takes a leading role in promoting public health and influencing public policy.

Their goal is to improve the health of all New Zealanders by progressively strengthening the organised efforts of society by being an informed collaborative and strong advocate for public health. PHA NZ

Whistle-blowing

The Protected Disclosures Act sets up a scheme for public and private sector employees to report serious wrong-doing in their workplace (sometimes called ‘whistle-blowing’) to an appropriate authority, such as an Ombudsman. Under the Act, if an employee makes a “protected disclosure” they will have certain rights and protections.

The Protected Disclosures Act:
• is about disclosure, in the public interest, of serious wrongdoing;
• sets out the procedures to be followed when making a disclosure; and
• protection to both public and private sector employees who make disclosures in accordance with the Act. Protected Disclosures Act.

WRAP

WRAP or ‘Women’s Rights and Advocacy in the Pacific’ is an Aotearoa NZ based group made up of New Zealand organisations (or affiliates of international organisations) which promote and work on the rights of women in the Pacific as all our part of their remit. WRAP

Links to other advocacy resources

Community Central – Articles about advocacy and links to community networks

Campaigning & Advocacy – How to Guides, Community Net Aotearoa

Tim Barnett’s Lobby Kit – Volunteer Wellington

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More than 50% of health promoters use M-Health: intern survey

A survey, by HPF intern Ancy Paul, has revealed that more than half the health promotion workforce use M-health – a health information programme for smart devices.

Savings from Preventing Lifetime Smoking and Obesity in Young Adults: A Scoping Study

Rhema Vaithianathan Department of Economics University of Auckland, April 2013
This is a scoping study which seeks to illustrate that building a case for health promotion need not be excessively costly, nor does it need to wait for the perfect data. We illustrate the ideas using obesity and smoking as exemplars.  Savings from Prevention

Health Evidence Health promotion effectiveness: intuition with evidence

This ‘Keeping Up to Date’ aims to increase awareness of the reasons to use evidence in practice,
to stimulate debate about evidence, and to encourage the health promotion workforce to contribute to the
evidence base by designing, delivering, and evaluating rigorous programmes.

Nicki Jackson. Nicki is a lecturer at AUT University and has extensive experience in the field of evidence-based
practice. Her work has provided her with the opportunity to work alongside international public
health professionals to move forward the debate in using evidence in health promotion practice and
develop the capacity of the health promotion workforce in using evidence. Keeping Up to Date – 22 edition

Health Evidence

Health Evidence is a Canadian service and research organization located at McMaster University, Hamilton, aimed at assisting public health decision makers in their use of research evidence. Health Evidence offers a suite of services to support the development of knowledge, skill and culture for evidence-informed decision making. Launched in 2005, a key resource, thehttp://www.health-evidence.ca/ registry of systematic reviews, provides free, user-friendly access to a searchable database of public health relevant, quality-appraised reviews. Tailored capacity assessments for evidence-informed decision making, workshops and presentations on evidence-informed decision making ‘how to’, and Knowledge Broker services to mentor individuals/teams/organizations are available to support incorporation of evidence into practice.

The Cochrane Library

The Cochrane Library is available free to all Nzers at:http://www.thecochranelibrary.com/
Accessing the library this way will help ensure the continued MoH funding for the subscription to continue.

The Campbell Collaboration

The Campbell Collaboration aims to help people make well-informed decisions by preparing, maintaining and disseminating systematic reviews in education, crime and justice, and social welfare.

The Campbell Collaboration is an international research network that produces systematic reviews of the effects of social interventions. Campbell is based on voluntary cooperation among researchers of a variety of backgrounds. Campbell’s strategic and policy making body is the Steering Group. Visit their website and library.

Evidence Based Health Promotion

The movement to develop ‘evidence based practice’ which first began in the field of medicine has spread to all parts of the health sector and other public sector activity. It is now widely accepted that activities to improve health should be supported by sound evidence.

What is evidence?
•At the most basic level, evidence involves ‘the available body of facts or information indicating whether a belief or proposition is true or valid’.
•Evidence based public health and policy is an exercise in constructing realities and interventions within particular contexts. For policy-decision makers, evidence may be defined as ‘anything that establishes a fact or gives reason for believing something’.   Visit the NSW Government Health websitefor more information and links to other useful sites.

Evidence of intervention effectiveness & cost-effectiveness

Research evidence, where available and of good quality, is an important component of decision making.  We aim to make this type of evidence more accessible to decision makers by providing short summaries of relevant existing research that also consider the possible application of the research to policy and practice.  The types of summaries that will become available in the short term are known as rapid reviews and evidence summaries. Results of relevant cost-effectiveness, cost-utility or cost-benefit analyses are also included.

The Victorian Government Health web page also includes  Overview | Rapid Reviews | Evidence Summaries | Evidence-based resources | Other evidence syntheses | Cost-effectiveness

The Question of Evidence in Health Promotion

Health promoters require credible evidence to identify relevant determinants of health, choose activiities to promote health, and then evaluate the effectivenss of these chosen activities.  This issue of evidence in health promotion is a complex one that requires critical examination of what is meant by health promotion, the focus of health promotion activities, and the ideological isssues and prinicples that inform health promotion practice.  It is argued that health promoters should be explicit about the prinicples and values behind their  health promotion activities, and consider how ideology, values and data interact to produce evidence.  Dennis Raphael, Health Promotion International Vol 5,No 4.

The Evidence of Health Promotion Effectiveness

A Report for the European Commission by the International Union for Health Promotion and Education  Assessing 20 years Evidence of the Health, Social, Economic and Political Impacts of Health Promotion,and Recommendations for Action.

In order to contribute to the debate on Europe’s developing public health policy, the
International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) decided to undertake an
ambitious and innovative project which would assess and collect the evidence of 20 years of
health promotion effectiveness.     Shaping Public Health in a New Europe

Evidence Supporting Population Health Promotion Initiatives

Population health promotion is about creating the conditions that support the best possible health for everyone. Promoting health is a shared responsibility that requires the co-ordinated action of many sectors working together to improve well-being.

The following document provides evidence from the literature supporting the need for health promotion. The document evidence is included in the areas of health promotion, healthy child development, heart health, home care, nutrition, physical activity/recreation, tobacco control and the workplace. Selected Literature Review
Population Health Branch, Saskatchewan Health

A Maori overview of programme evaluation
The evaluation hikoi:

This book aims to:

  • Provide the reader with an overview of the issues surrounding public health
    programme evaluation by and for Maori
  • Give examples of the range of approaches that might be useful
  • Highlight areas that evaluators may need to consider.

There are many different models and frameworks that can be used to guide indigenous researchers. Our approach has been to grapple with what it means, as Maori, to carry out formative, process and impact evaluation. The issues involved are described in this book. They include considerations of ownership, power, how to describe and identify measures and the challenges of maintaining credibility as Maori and as Maori evaluators. We acknowledge that much of this will be familiar to those experienced in programme provision or evaluation. It is our hope this book might
provide new perspectives or insights.  Maori Evaluation Manual

This resource is designed to be used alongside other toolkitsto be available on the Whariki Research Group website.

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The Partnership Analysis Tool
For Partners in Health Promotion

A resource for establishing, developing and maintaining productive partnerships. Produced by John McLeod on behalf of Vic Health, it assists organisations to develop a clearer understanding of the range of purposes of collaborations, reflect on established partnerships and look at ways to move forward. The Partnership Analysis Tool

Collaborative Strategies

We expect the site will be useful to partnership members, researchers, policy makers, and funders interested in using collaborative approaches to improve community health and well-being.  Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health

Integrated Health Promotion

Health Promotion, Primary and Community Health Victorian Department of Human Services, Australia have developed  Integrated  health promotion:  A  practice guide for service  providers  and Measuring health promotion impacts: A guide to impact  evaluation in integrated health promotion, resource kit.

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