Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Runanga Whakapiki Ake i te Hauora o Aotearoa
News

Today is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples and the spotlight is being shone on forced migration.

This year’s theme focuses on the current situation of indigenous territories, the root causes of migration, trans-border movement and displacement, with a specific focus on indigenous peoples living in urban areas and across international borders.

The observance will explore the challenges and ways forward to revitalise indigenous peoples’ identities and encourage the protection of their rights in or outside their traditional territories.

In his message to mark the day UN Secretary-General António  Guterres focused on the factors pushing indigenous people to migrate “within their countries and across international borders” despite their “profound spiritual connection to their lands and resources”.

Mr Guterres noted that “some are subject to displacement or relocation without their free, prior and informed consent”, adding that “others are escaping violence and conflict or the ravages of climate change and environmental degradation” and that many migrate in search of better prospects and employment for themselves and their families.

He stated that while migration is an opportunity, “it also carries inherent risks” citing the unsafe and unsanitary conditions many end up living in, especially in urban areas.

Referring to the Global Compact for migration, which UN Member States have committed to adopt later this year, Mr Guterres said “this will establish an international framework for regional and global cooperation” and “provide a platform to maximize the benefits of migration and support vulnerable migrant groups, including indigenous peoples”.

He called for the full realisation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, “including the rights to self-determination and to traditional lands, territories and resources”.

Click here to read full story.

HPF’s executive director Sione Tu’itahi reflected on the significance of the day especially in light of one of the underlying themes of the 23rd IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion in Rotorua from April 7-11 which was Indigenous knowledge on health promotion.

The conference will provide a valuable platform for the sharing of this knowledge, he said.

“Indigenous knowledge enunciates that humanity and its environment are one…Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development can offer solutions to our global challenges today,” said Mr Tu’itahi.

In a joint statement marking the day a group of UN experts say it is crucial that the rights of indigenous peoples are realised when they migrate or are displaced from their lands.

States around the world must take effective action to guarantee the human rights of indigenous people,” say the experts.

“In many parts of the world, indigenous peoples have become migrants because they are fleeing economic deprivation, forced displacement, environmental disasters including climate change impacts, social and political unrest, and militarisation. Indigenous peoples have shown remarkable resilience and determination in these extreme situations.”

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in the world, living across 90 countries. They make up less than five per cent of the world’s population, but account for 15 per cent of the poorest. They speak an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7000 languages and represent 5000 different cultures. Read more.

0

News

The deadline is looming for abstracts to be submitted for next year’s health promotion conference in Rotorua, New Zealand.

 

Preparations for the conference from April 7-11 are gaining momentum and with the deadline date of August 31 just around the corner, time is ticking to get your abstract in for the chance to exchange knowledge and build networks with up to 2000 delegates from around the world.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is co-hosting the conference which has the theme Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development.

The approximate date of acceptance of abstracts is October 22 and all abstracts must be submitted through this online form.  Submissions can be made in English, Spanish, French and Te Reo Māori.

HPF’s Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi says the conference will be an invaluable forum for those in the sector to share strategies, policies and practices.

“I encourage you, if you haven’t already, to get your abstracts in before the due date. The opportunity to share expertise and knowledge with like-minded people from around the world and New Zealand is too good to pass up.

“Your story is unique. But your fellow health promoters won’t know until you show and tell. Share and learn from world experience.”

All abstract submitters, including individual contributors, are encouraged to interact  and collaborate with other presenters and participants wherever possible. Participatory, collaborative and non-traditional session formats will be given priority in the selection process.

Eight major formats are offered for submission: symposium; workshop; research oral/poster presentation; innovation in policy and practice oral/poster presentation; round table discussion; alternative showing/new technology; alternative showing/art, and lunch with an author.

The committee is encouraging submissions to match the sub-themes of the conference. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the four conference sub-themes:

Health equity 
Ensure health equity throughout the life course, within and among countries, making each member of the global society an empowered lifelong learner.

Inclusive habitats 
Make all urban and other habitats inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and conducive to health and wellbeing.

Climate change adaptation strategies 
Design and implement effective and fair climate change adaptation strategies.

Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance 
Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance at all levels that promotes, peace, justice and respect of human rights.

For further information on each of these formats please click here.

0

News

A major cause of New Zealand’s high rates of obesity has been mapped in a world-first study from the University of Auckland.

The study provides a full picture of the healthiness of New Zealand food environments.

The study which was conducted by INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/NCFs Research, Monitoring and Action Support) found that food environments, especially children’s environments, were largely unhealthy, and policy implementation was low.

Food industry commitments are relatively weak, more than half of the packaged food supply is unhealthy and children and young people are exposed to considerable marketing of unhealthy foods through all media channels were some of the findings.

Significantly, those living in poorer areas were found to be exposed to about three times as many takeaways, fast food outlets and convenience stores; more ads for unhealthy foods around schools and more shelf space devoted to unhealthy foods in supermarkets than wealthier neighbourhoods.

HPF’s Pacific strategist Dr Viliami Puloka commended the study for approaching the issue at a policy level.

Dr Puloka said this approach was necessary because the focus was to highlight that it was the ‘environment’ that matters and that it has a strong influence on personal/individual choices and lifestyle behaviours.

“If you are waking up in an area with half-a-dozen fast food outlets next door to you it is hard to keep away … you have to be almost superhuman to resist.

“The manufacturers and businesses major food companies have done their homework. They know where the vulnerable people are.”

Dr Puloka said it was interesting to see the results from the study’s measurements of the length of shelf space dedicated to different products in supermarkets.

According to the research the length of shelf space allocated to sets of unhealthy and healthy indicator foods showed an overall ratio of 0.42 (1m of unhealthy to 0.42m healthy indicator foods). In more deprived areas the shelf length ratio was more weighed towards unhealthy foods (0.38) than in less deprived areas (o.44).

Dr Puloka emphasised the need for consumers to band together and push for healthier options in supermarkets and other outlets.

“We in health promotion will continue to share our knowledge and understanding … we need to create a hunger for healthy food so there is a demand. If we stand together and believe we have the power to influence these major players in the food industry

“It is already happening.  Fast food outlets now sell salads and wraps. Healthier options in a number of places are now available,” added Dr Puloka.

On a bright note the study found that DHBs were taking a leadership role when it came to health food choices and that the nutrition policies of DHBs were much stronger and more comprehensive. An analysis of DHB policies in 2017 found an average strength score of 58 per cent and comprehensive scores of 70 per cent.

This was in contrast to schools, which the survey revealed had substantial scope to improve school food policies and practices. Only 40 per cent of schools had a written food policy and these policies had very low strength scores (average 3 per cent) and comprehensiveness scores (average 16 per cent).

“People choose their diets from the food environments around them and when these are dominated by unhealthy foods and drinks, it is no surprise that our overall diets are unhealthy and our obesity rates are so high,” said Professor Boyd Swinburn who led the three-year study funded by the Health Research Council and the Heart Foundation.

“Of the many sub-studies in this project, several areas emerged where action could really make a difference,” said Professor Swinburn.

“The food in schools was surprisingly unhealthy given all the publicity about rising childhood obesity and food marketing to children was heavily dominated by unhealthy foods across all forms of media and used techniques to engage children such as premium offers and cartoon characters. Food labelling was also a problem with slow uptake of the Health Star Rating system and many unhealthy foods carrying positive nutrition claims.”

Professor Kathryn McPherson of the Health Research Council agreed that ‘choice’ was a complex topic and, for many people, making good food choices was hampered by strong environmental cues such as which food is most readily available.

“We welcome the important findings of this research which should inform decisions by schools, policy makers, and indeed food manufacturers.”

0

News

Hāpai Te Hauora in collaboration with Australian Progress is recruiting participants for this year’s Fellowship.

Designed specifically for mid-senior leaders in social change, the Aotearoa Fellowship will super-charge your skills and energy, help you gain further confidence as a social change leader, and connect you with a community of your peers from across Aotearoa.

The Aotearoa fellowship is book-ended by two intensive four-day retreats, with five interactive expert webinars in-between. You will explore the latest thinking in: Campaign strategy; Messaging & framing; Digital engagement; Community organising; Advocacy & decision-maker and engagement.

The fellowship has been run in collaboration between Hāpai Te Hauora Maori Public Health and the Centre for Australian Progress for the past three years.

At the completion of the fellowship, all participants join a “remarkable Trans-Tasman network of change-makers”.

There are a number of registration spaces available, apply here, where you will find all the details about the fellowship, and the cost for attendance.

Over two cohorts in 2016 and 2017, 40 fellows have completed the fellowship in New Zealand, from organisations such as Hāpai Te Hauora, Amnesty International, Mapu Maia (Pacific Arm of the Problem Gambling Foundation), 350 Aotearoa, the Public Service Association, the Blind Foundation, ActionStation, Safe, JustSpeak and the National Council of Women.

In 2017, NZ fellows were joined by five fellows from Australia, and the programme remains open to Australians based outside Sydney and Melbourne.

Photo: Members of the 2017 Fellowship cohort.

0

Competencies

After the overwhelmingly positive feedback from participants who attended the most recent courses run by HPF, news that the next two courses have been confirmed is welcome.

The Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion will be held in Wellington and Auckland. Block One of the Wellington course will be held from September 4- 7 and Block Two from October 2-5 at Te Aroha Clubrooms (opposite Waiwhetu Marae), 148 Whites Line East, Waiwhetu, Lowerhutt.

In Auckland, Block One will be held from October 30 to November 2 and Block Two from November 27 to 30 at the Manukau Institute of Technology in Otara. Click here to complete the online registration.

HPF’s Trevor Simpson who will facilitate the course also facilitated the Māori Concepts of Health workshop in Blenheim on May 7.

Participants praised Mr Simpson for his excellent knowledge and resources and described him as an “amazing presenter, easily relatable, humorous and clear”.

The participants came away from the workshop “energised, confident, motivated” and ready to tackle their jobs with a new-found enthusiasm.

They agreed they learned so much about the identity of Māori and why this needs to be respected when working in health promotion.

Sally Tonill a social worker from Nelson Bays Primary Health said this was one of the most interesting trainings she had done around Māori worldview.

“It has reignited my interest in how I work and engage with Māori in community, as I was getting a bit jaded.”

Pam Maxted of the Marlborough District Health Board said the presentation was well balanced and made her really mindful of how much she needed to listen to Maori in the relationship-building process.

Understanding Māori myth, legends and customs was also a highlight for participants.

A limited number of scholarships for the health promotion courses are available. Contact emma@hauora.co.nz for an application.

(In the banner photo are students at the Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion course at MIT in Manukau with course facilitator, Trevor Simpson, left, from April 17 to 20 and May 15 to 18.)

 

 

Students wrapped up the course with team presentations, showcasing not only what they had learned and understood but how creatively they could get their message across to their audience.

 

 

 

The team presentations entertained and informed the audience, which comprised fellow students.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Facilitator, Trevor Simpson is the Deputy Executive Director and Senior Health Promotion Strategist with the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand. Trevor has a background in community development, Māori social development, Treaty settlements and Māori health promotion. He is committed to Māori health promotion as an important vehicle to improving Māori health outcomes and Māori community development.

 

0

Global, Uncategorized

More speakers have been confirmed for the world conference on health promotion in Rotorua next year adding to the diverse line-up.

They include respected indigenous leaders from around the world and New Zealand who will be sharing their knowledge and expertise at the 23rd International Union of Health Promotion and Education World Conference from April 7 to 11.

Registrations  for the conference which is co-hosted by the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand are now open and the call for abstracts has gone out.

We take a look at: Dr Stanley Vollant, the first indigenous surgeon in Quebec, Canada; Sir Mason Durie, one of New Zealand’s most respected academics, knighted in 2010 for services to public and Māori health and Tamati Kruger, Māori advocate and social and political analyst.

Dr Vollant who grew up in the Côte-Nord region of Quebec was exposed at a young age to the traditional teachings of his grandfather, which were marked by the importance of community values.

He received his degree in medicine from the Université de Montréal in 1989 and his specialisation in general surgery in 1994.

During the first annual “Stanley Vollant Challenge,” a six-kilometre walk to promote health and wellness he told CBC News that he wanted to inspire Indigenous youth across Quebec to follow their dreams, while also leading healthy lifestyles.

He said it was important to bring Indigenous and non-Indigenous walkers together in the spirit of reconciliation.

“My vision is to bring people to celebrate wellness and also to celebrate [being] all together, Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.”

Sir Mason who was born in 1938, of Rangitane, Ngāti Kauwhata and Ngāti Raukawa descent, grew up in Feilding, where his hard-working parents showed him the importance of a strong work ethic.

Between 1986-1988 he served on the New Zealand Royal Commission on Social Policy and in 1988 accepted a position at Massey University as Professor and Head of Te Pūtahi a Toi, School of Māori Studies.  Up until retirement in June 2012 he was Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Māori Research and Development.

He has been at the forefront of a transformational approach to Māori health and has played major roles in building the Māori health workforce for more than 40 years.

He has also championed higher education for Māori and has published widely on Māori health, Māori policy, the Treaty of Waitangi, Māori education and whānau development.

In his book Nga Tini Whetu NAVIGATING MAORI FUTURES he says in the introduction that, “If there is a single message to this book, it is that Maori have the knowledge, skills and foresight to create a future where younger generations yet to come can prosper in the world, and at the same time live as Maori”.

The model he created for healthcare, Te Whare Tapa Wha, successfully challenged the notion that health is the same for people of all cultures.

He has also made significant strides with his work in mental health, and most recently, the prevention of suicide in Maori and Pasifika communities.

During 2009 he chaired the Ministerial Taskforce on Whānau Centred Initiatives and from 2011 was chair of the Whānau Ora Governance Group.  In 2018 he was also a panel member for the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addictions.

Upon being awarded the Blake Medal at last year’s Sir Peter Blake Leadership Awards Sir Mason told the NZ Herald: “The most important thing has been the difference to health. That’s where my career started and it’s continued to be what I spent most of my time doing.

“It’s really how to make people more aware that health is not just a question for doctors and nurses, but a question people have themselves.”

Mr Kruger is a Māori advocate and social and political analyst who has dedicated his career to the development of his iwi. From the Ngāti Koura, Ngāti Rongo and Te Urewera hapū of Tūhoe, Mr Kruger was instrumental in securing the largest Treaty of Waitangi settlement to date ($450 million) for the Central North Island Iwi Collective.

He is now a director of CNI Holdings, representing Tūhoe.

More recently, Mr Kruger was chief negotiator of the Tūhoe-Te Urewera Treaty of Waitangi Settlement. The landmark settlement included a Crown apology for historical grievances, a social service management plan for the Tūhoe rohe and a financial and commercial redress package totalling $170 million.

The settlement also included legislative changes to transfer Te Urewera National Park to its own separate legal entity, looked after by the Te Urewera Board, of which Mr Kruger is chair.

Mr Kruger’s contribution is not limited to his tribe. He chaired the Second Ministerial Māori Taskforce on Whānau Violence and developed the Mauri Ora Framework and was awarded the Kahukura award in 2013 in recognition of this work.

In an interview with Asia Pacific Report he said an important part of leadership involved navigating the difference between Māori and Pākehā politics.

“Part of the blessing of Pākehā politics is you have this apparatus called law, where you can bend people to one’s will. But in Tūhoe politics you have to depend on your reputation and integrity for people to find that whatever you have to say has some wisdom and truth in it.”

The official languages of the conference are English, Spanish, French and in a world-first for Māori and other indigenous cultures Te Reo Māori.

Abstracts must be in by August 31 and submissions can be made in the official languages.

 

0

Global

For the first time, the World Conference on Health Promotion will be held in New Zealand from April 7-11, 2019. Rotorua is the venue. The conference provides rare opportunities for New Zealand health promoters, other health professionals, policy makers and others whose work impacts directly on our health and wellbeing, to share knowledge with colleagues from around the world, and to co-construct health promoting pathways into the future.

 

Hauora catches up with HPF’s Executive Director, Sione Tu’itahi, on the significance of the conference for New Zealand and the world.

 

What made you decide to invite the conference to NZ?

There were three major reasons.  First, New Zealand is part of the global community. And we have common, global challenges that determine our health and wellbeing, such as the environment, economy, education, governance and leadership, which directly impact at the national and local levels.

To address these challenges, we must engage on all levels, especially at the global level. No man is an island anymore. The world is but one country.

Second, and as part of the significant damage caused mostly by us humans to our natural and built environment, climate change is the most urgent issue to be addressed today. Our Pacific region, is where climate change is most evident – eroding and sinking islands, sea level-rise because of global warming, tsunamis, cyclones, and people having to migrate from their homelands because of these disasters.  Clearly, the environment is one of the major determinants of our health and wellbeing. So our region must engage in finding solutions to these issues through health promotion and other professional fields. And it is timely and propitious to have that conversation in our region so that health promoters, other health workers, policy makers and other professionals whose work impacts on our health and wellbeing, come together to share experience and explore solutions. That is why we have the conference over-arching theme as “Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All,” and the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as the framework.

Third, New Zealand is a world leader in Indigenous knowledge and health promotion. Indigenous knowledge systems are now being acknowledged as contributors of solutions to world problems.  We can share our experience with the rest of the world, and we can learn from their experience too. For example, Indigenous cultures see humanity as part of and inseparable from the environment. Therefore, we humans must live in harmony with nature, and within its limits.  The dominant cultural paradigms of the last two centuries regard humans as not only separate from but also owners of the environment, which is seen as a limitless resource to exploit for their insatiable wants. Today we all experience the folly of such perspectives and practices. I think we are beginning to learn some lessons from that erroneous worldview and its underlying values and principles.

Overall, we decided to host because we think that New Zealand health promotion can contribute to addressing inequities and the wellbeing of the world. But also, we have a lot to learn from colleagues around the world, and to strengthen our relationship with IUHPE which leads the ongoing advancement of health promotion, including the development of the global accreditation framework for health promoters. HPF is party to the development of that global accreditation framework which will enhance the efficacy of the health promotion profession for the competency of health promoters and the wellbeing of peoples and communities they serve around the world. Among other benefits, it will also give international recognition to national health promotion qualifications, with positive implications for work in other countries.

 

What other benefits can New Zealand gain from the conference?

There are a few major benefits, not just for New Zealand but for the rest of the world. Evidence-based knowledge that works will be shared and everyone will learn at the conference.  Also, national, regional, and international networks and collaborative efforts will be further enhanced and strengthened among professionals across health and other sectors. We have no choice but to work together, or we suffer and perish together, whether we like it or not.

A third benefit is that two statements from the conference will provide future pathways for policy makers, health professionals and communities on how to address our common, global challenges that impact on our common home, planet earth. One of these two future-focus statements will be on Indigenous health promotion.

A fourth benefit is that Te Reo Maori is elevated to one of the four official languages of the conference. This is a world-first for IUHPE and for New Zealand. It might be a small step, but to have an indigenous language as one of the official languages of a world conference is a giant step for indigenous human rights. It is also a most empowering message to indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities in terms of championing their rights, their wellbeing, and preserving their knowledge systems through preserving their languages. Actually, having Te Reo as an official language is part of our using of Te Tiriti o Waitangi as the framework for organising the conference. It is another way of sharing our New Zealand experience with the rest of the world.

A fifth benefit for New Zealand is the aspirational goals for Rotorua to be a ‘healthy city’ under the World Health Organization (WHO) system.  And, of course the 2000 participants will bring economic gains for the country, and not just the tourism sector. It is our experience that participants travel to gain knowledge and enhance their professional networks, but they also take their families and loved ones to visit the host country. It’s a great way of promoting our beautiful country to the world. So you see, the conference will bring many benefits to all parties. It is a win-win initiative.

 

But what challenges do you and your team face in organising this world event in NZ?

There are the usual logistical challenges that come with organising events, such as finance, appropriate venues, communication, transport, accommodation and food. All this while trying to create a high-quality scientific and social programmes that will attract the top of your profession as keynote speakers, as well as other participants who will bring their latest research findings and professional experience to share and to learn from one another.

What makes it more challenging is that you have to build an international organisational structure at three levels – global, national and local – to plan and manage across different time zones with colleagues around the world. Put on top of that the fact that you have to have keynote speakers from the four official languages of the conference – English, French, Spanish, and Te Reo Maori, and consider gender balance, linguistic & ethnic diversity, and age. But thanks to technology, our 100 HPF member organisations, our professional conference company (The Conference Company), and the help of Tourism New Zealand, as well as our co-organiser, IUHPE, we are managing well, with the usual hiccups, of course.  Challenges are good and timely incentives to help ensure you do your utmost best and become more innovative and prudent at the same time.

(Sione pictured catching up with Pacific delegates from Tuvalu and Kiribati at the WHO congress on health promotion, Shanghai, 2016)

 

From an educational perspective, this is excellent professional development training for our team and others in the country and overseas who have volunteered to help organise the conference.  It gives you a real sense of how we live and work as a global village – i.e. we work together across national, geographic and cultural borders to address challenges that confront us all as one human family. As for the conference programme, we have a line-up of public health and health promotion leaders, such as Sir Michael Marmot, Professors Fran Baum, Anthony Capon, and Sir Mason Durie, as keynote speakers. And we are shaping up a highly educational and informative scientific programme that our expected 2000 participants will enjoy and learn a lot from.

You will find more details on the conference website http://www.iuhpe2019.com/

We would love to see all our health promotion and public health colleagues around the world, especially those here in the country, join us. Because public health and health promotion is so relevant to other sectors, such as education, local government, social work, community development, and sustainable development, we would like to think that this is also a conference for colleagues working in those sectors. Health and wellbeing in its broadest meaning and dimensions, such as physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, economic wellbeing, social wellbeing, cultural wellbeing, and environmental wellbeing, are at the core of the work of most sectors.

 

You started planning the conference in 2016, but you have been involved with IUHPE for more than 10 years now. For example, you have been a member of the IUHPE Global Executive Board, and Vice President of IUHPE for the South West-Pacific region for some six years. What prompted you to be involved with IUHPE?

The main reason is we are now a global village. Our global challenges are not only inter-connected but they impact on all levels – from the local to the global, and vice-versa. IUHPE provides that global platform and network for health promotion and HPF, hence my involvement. Our focus is still New Zealand, but we include other levels in our work here at HPF. Take smoking and climate change as two health challenges. They impact on all levels. New Zealand’s involvement at the global level helps to find more lasting solutions at its national level for both issues.

The other reason is that good governance and effective leadership is needed if we are to be effective in whatever field we work. HPF saw the opportunity to lead and we took it up on behalf of the South-West Pacific region, which covers NZ, Australia, all other Pacific island nations, and some countries in South East Asia.

My first IUHPE world conference on health promotion was in 2007 in Vancouver, Canada. I attended along with former HPF Executive Director, Dr Alison Blaiklock, and another former HPF co-worker, Joanne Aoake. I saw then the opportunity to build the relationship with IUHPE, and bring my experience and learning to our team and the health promotion workforce. Hosting the conference is the latest development of that professionalrelationship with IUHPE. But there are other developments such as having our Deputy Executive Director, Trevor Simpson, as the Chair of the International Network for Indigenous Health Promotion Professionals (INIHPP) of IUHPE. HPF is also leading the work for New Zealand health promotion to become part of the global accreditation framework for health promotion, recently established by IUHPE. IUHPE has a standing work relationship with WHO, which is a partner of the conference, along with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), being led by Dr Colin Tukuitonga, and the Australian Health Promotion Association.

(Taking time out for a photo with Professor Ilona Kickbusch, one of the architects of the Ottawa Charter, 1986.)

 

You have years of working as a journalist in Tonga and the Pacific, then retrained as a teacher and taught at some of the tertiary educational institutions here in New Zealand. Why did you later choose to work in health? And what has the experience been like for you?

Health and education are two important and related determinants of the wellbeing and prosperity of Pacific peoples, in fact, all people. Good education means not only you are enlightened, but you also have a decent income which enables you to afford a healthy life, and be in control of your future. I learned these things early on through my family experience, especially from my grandparents and parents.  They were humble folk from humble beginnings in Tonga, but education, being prudent, hard work and serving others were central values and goals.

My mass communication, teaching, and strategic capacity-building experience were very handy when I was invited to set up a Pacific team at the Auckland Regional Public Health Service some 20 years ago. At the time I was starting to build the Pacific capacity of Massey University. I saw the invitation as an opportunity to do the same strategic work for Pacific peoples in the health sector as well. I was later seconded to build the Pacific capacity of HPF, which led to where I am today.  For more than 10 years, I shared my time between Massey University and HPF, until I decided recently to focus on my health work, for now.

 

And your strategic outcomes for the conference? 

There are at least three strategic outcomes. And the conference is a platform to enhance those long-term outcomes: Strengthen our co-leadership in health promotion at the global level, such as our work with IUHPE, which not only elevates the prestige of HPF, but more importantly, helps to build the capability and capacity of the health promotion workforce and sector in NZ and the world, for the wellbeing of society. Enhance our leading contribution to the world in Indigenous health promotion; Ensure the sustainable strength and longevity of HPF and the health promotion sector in New Zealand.

 

 

0

Environment

New Zealand is walking the talk in the battle to tackle climate change with 18 health organisations as well as 60 businesses committing to decisive action on the issue.

On July 6 in a historic meeting for climate change and health, members of the leading health professional organisations, including the Health Promotion Forum of NZ, met with the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw, to add their support for a strong Zero Carbon Act.

Attendees at the meeting of health organisations hosted by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons were united in their call for decisive action on climate change to protect and improve health and fairness for New Zealanders.

“There is a strong consensus among health professionals that New Zealand needs a robust law to get to net zero greenhouse gas emissions,” said Dr Rhys Jones, co-convenor of OraTaiao, the NZ Climate & Health Council.

“A Zero Carbon Act will need to set targets and action that are fast, fair, firm and founded on Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Three decades of sitting on our hands means we now need to face the reality that all sectors must play their part in responding to the climate crisis. We need to reach net zero for all our greenhouse gas emissions by 2040.”

Sione Tui’tahi, HPF’s Executive Director who attended the meeting said it was encouraging to see members in the health sector working together for our collective wellbeing.

The Zero Carbon Bill consultation ends on July 19.

The move by the business community to take action has been praised as “strong” and “unprecedented” by local and global organisations.

CEOs have formed the Climate Leaders Coalition, recognising the role that business can play in bringing about change and signing a joint statement, which commits their companies to action.

By signing the CEO Climate Change Statement, each of the business leaders has committed to measuring and reporting their greenhouse gas emissions and working with suppliers to reduce emissions, with the aim of helping to keep global warming within 2C, as specified in the Paris Agreement.

Convenor of the coalition, Z Energy CEO, Mike Bennetts said: “I knew that many businesses were making progress with their own company’s response to climate change but that still left a gap around what we could be doing more of together to increase the pace and scale of impact from our collective efforts.

“So, it made sense to discuss those opportunities and commit to further action.”

The new group includes the leaders of Z, Westpac, Ngai Tahu Holdings, Vector, Air New Zealand, Spark and NZ Post.

 

 

Members of leading health organisations, including HPF, meeting with the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw to add their support for a strong Zero Carbon Act.

0

Environment

Ramping up action to combat climate change is essential if we are to help our Pacific Island neighbours says the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw.

Mr Shaw made the comment after The Declaration for Ambition on climate change was signed by the High Ambition Coalition group of countries, including New Zealand, recently.

 The declaration underscores the urgency for countries to enhance their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) by 2020 in line with the Paris Agreement; put in place long-term strategies to reach net zero emissions; and secure the support and investment to ensure effective implementation.

Mr Shaw says as the world works towards the next United Nations climate change conference in Poland later this year, it is important to join with other countries to push for effective climate action and implementation of the Paris Agreement.

“This is about protecting a stable climate for future generations of people in New Zealand and around the world, and helping our Pacific neighbours avoid the potential impacts of climate change and rising seas,” Mr Shaw says.

The Pacific Islands as a group may be the planet’s most vulnerable nations to the effects of climate change, with some facing possible obliteration. The effects on families and communities can be devastating.

For most countries, a net zero target is widely seen as necessary to be consistent with promises made under the Paris climate treaty to limit global warming to well below 2C and ideally 1.5C, the level scientists agree is necessary to minimise climatic disruption and save low-lying island states.

According to Climate Action Network (CAN) The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on 1.5C, due to be released in October, is likely to confirm that limiting warming to 1.5C is feasible, but hard to achieve.

This makes it essential and urgent therefore for all countries to join these front-runners and step up to enhance their NDCs by 2020 states CAN.

Countries that signed the declaration promised to “lead from the front” on climate action.

They are Argentina, Britain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, Norway, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Spain and Sweden.

“We commit to exploring the possibilities for stepping up our own ambition, in light of the forthcoming IPCC Special Report on 1.5C, and in this context emphasise the importance of the Talanoa Dialogue at COP24,” the first line of the Declaration reads.

The Talanoa Dialogue which was launched at the UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn in November 2017 and will run throughout 2018 is the Fijian presidency of the UN climate talks initiative to encourage countries and businesses to showcase their climate action.

Health threats from climate changes include: worsening illness and injury from heat and other extreme weather, changing patterns of infection including food poisoning, loss of seafood and farming livelihoods, food price rises and mass migration from the Pacific. Those on low incomes, Māori, Pacific people, children and older people will be hit first and hardest, but nobody will be immune to the widespread health and social threats of unchecked climate change. Direct and indirect climate change impacts are already being seen here from warming oceans and sea level rise.

 

The north coast of the Tongatapu group, Tonga and the lagoons are low lying and vulnerable to sea-level rise. Here the effects of coastal erosion at Lifuka in the Ha’apai group are evident. (Photo: Tonga: LiDAR factsheet)

 

 

 

 

 

0

News

New Zealand is part of 23 countries walking the talk when it comes to pushing for effective climate action.

The Declaration for Ambition on climate change was signed by the High Ambition Coalition group of countries, including New Zealand, recently.

The declaration underscores the urgency for countries to enhance their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) by 2020 in line with the Paris Agreement; put in place long-term strategies to reach net zero emissions and secure the support and investment to ensure effective implementation.

The Health Promotion Forum of NZ has welcomed the move to step up climate action.

HPF’s Executive Director, Sione Tui’tahi says it is heartening to see nations trying to work together for our collective wellbeing.

“Climate change must be addressed now if we are to offer a healthy future for our grandchildren,” he says.

Minister for Climate Change James Shaw says as the world works towards the next United Nations climate change conference in Poland later this year, it’s important to join with other countries to push for effective climate action and implementation of the Paris Agreement.

“Taking action to reduce emissions at home is important, which is why the Government is developing a Zero Carbon Bill …

“This is about protecting a stable climate for future generations of people in New Zealand and around the world, and helping our Pacific neighbours avoid the potential impacts of climate change and rising seas,” Mr Shaw says.

For most countries, a net zero target is widely seen as necessary to be consistent with promises made under the Paris climate treaty to limit global warming to well below 2C and ideally 1.5C, the level scientists agree is necessary to minimise climatic disruption and save low-lying island states.

The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on 1.5C, due to be released in October, is likely to confirm that limiting warming to 1.5C is feasible, but hard to achieve.

Climate Action Network International points out that this therefore makes it essential and urgent for all countries to join these front-runners and step up to enhance their NDCs by 2020.

Signatories to the declaration are Argentina, Britain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Spain and Sweden.

 

0

News

Empowering, informative, inspiring and interactive were just some of the enthusiastic comments from participants at the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Auckland last week.

The Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) workshop held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre on June 15 focused on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective.

The workshop which was facilitated by HPF’s Dr Viliami Puloka was attended by 21 participants from around and outside Auckland.

Middlemore Hospital’s Delilah Hutcheson was impressed with the interactive group participation and the facilitator’s knowledge.

Ms Hutcheson said she planned to apply and incorporate what she gained from the workshop into their Pacific cultural competency training for new employees. “Some of the contents are invaluable.”

Jennifer Beatson of the Nelson Tasman Pacific Community Trust who was attending her first health promotion workshop said she learned so much; she was now eager to attend other health promotion courses.

“Health promotion will be an area… we will definitely be looking closely at,” she said.

Ngakiri Antonovich of the Northland Pacific Island Charitable Trust Inc said she now felt better and more informed to help Pacific people in Whangarei.

“My first introduction to Pacific health only just started two weeks ago. The stats and info provided at the workshop were great and informative.”

Having more empathy was also something participants agreed was a key part of the course.

“People don’t care what you know until they know how much you care. It is about building relationships, seeing where people are at and not pushing your values and ideas on them,” said Ms Antonovich.

Francis Latu of the Waitemata DHB said not only did she have a better understanding of what health promotion was all about but she learned to be more empathetic towards people’s situations.

Ms Hutcheson said she would be more aware of her surroundings and interactions with others. “Be proud to share what you know of your culture.”

Otara Health Charitable Trust’s Zondervan Fa’alafi said his attitude towards the Pacific community was challenged and renewed as a result of the workshop.

“I feel more competent, confident and compassionate in carrying out my work.”

Reverend Ifalemi Teisi encouraged other health workers to do the workshop which he described as “inspiring, and encouraging”.

Participants also enjoyed the one-plus-one number activity demonstrated by HPF’s Emma Frost, as well as the healthy and tasty morning tea and lunch.

“Yum,” was the general consensus.

Interesting stats from the workshop:

Pacific Profile: 2013 census

  • Pacific peoples make up 7.4% of NZ population
  • Fourth most common ethnic group
  • Two thirds Pacific born in NZ
  • Pacific ethnic profiles numbered 19
  • By 2026 project growth will be 10% of the population so an increase in NZ births, student body and workforce, taxpayer base, voters & consumers
  • Represented by 13 distinct languages and cultural groups born here and in the Pacific
  • High rates of intermarriage (redefining Pacific with mixed ethnicities)

 

Banner pic:

Dr Viliami Puloka, left, with participants at the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop on June 15.

 

 

Dr Viliami Puloka uses a map to show participants just how vast the Pacific region is. As he says: “Pasifika models enable Pasifika peoples to see the world through their own eyes and experience.”

 

Participants listen intently.

0

News

A group launched in Switzerland last month is now ready to start forging a new path for improved indigenous health everywhere says the group’s Co-Chair Adrian Te Patu.

Mr Te Patu made the comment after the launch of the Indigenous Working Group (IWG) of the World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA) at the University of Geneva.

Mr Te Patu a WFPHA Governing Council member pointed out that public health experts and Indigenous health leaders around the world had been calling on their governments for recognition of Indigenous health as a top priority.

He thanked the particularly strong efforts by Australia and New Zealand over the past year.

Carmen Parter, Co-Chair and Vice President at the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) said this was a significant event for the 370 million Indigenous people worldwide.

“A key feature of the Indigenous Working Group is that it will be underpinned by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

“The Declaration strongly emphasises the need for Indigenous People’s self-determination and that’s why the Working Group will be led by indigenous people. We are the people who need to be driving change in health policy, because it is us, our families, and our communities who are suffering from this health inequity,” Ms Parter said.

Once in operation, the IWG will bring together indigenous peoples from around the world to exchange knowledge, engage in collective advocacy, form active partnerships, source funding and resources, and seek out research opportunities to develop the evidence base that informs global and national Indigenous public health policies.

This aligns with and will continue to support the WFPHA’s Global Charter for the Public’s Health and its Strategic Plan. In addition, it continues to contribute towards the goals and priority areas of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Meanwhile, the group’s launch joins another exciting initiative and a world-first for Māori and other indigenous cultures at the 23rd IUHPE World Health Promotion conference in Rotorua from April 7 to 11, 2019 which will feature Maori as one of its four official languages.

One of the underlying themes of the conference, co-hosted by HPF, is Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development. Click here for more info on the conference.

 

Banner picture:

SUPPORTIVE: Indigenous working group and associates support Rheumatic Heart Disease Action side event at World Health Assembly Geneva 2018. From left, Summer May Finlay (PHAA), Adrian Te Patu (PHANZ), Emma Rawson (PHANZ), the Minister for Health Dr David Clark and Dr Mariam Parwaiz (NZ).

 

READY-TO-ROLL: Co-Chairs Carmen Parter (PHAA) and Adrian Te Patu, front, and co-vice chairs Emma Rawson and Summer May Finlay on their way to the general assembly of the WFPHA.

0

A report which outlines the harm caused by exposing children to alcohol at school fundraisers is a good move from a health promotion perspective says Dr Viliami Puloka.

 

The Hawke’s Bay District Health Board has endorsed the report which was prepared by Rowan Manhire-Heath with support from the Hawke’s Bay DHB Population Health and Business Intelligence teams and suggests ways schools can become alcohol-free .

According to the report the Hawke’s Bay population as a whole is drinking more hazardously than New Zealanders on average and of particular concern to the DHB is the presence and promotion of alcohol in schools and educational settings.

“The District Health Board is clear in its position: alcohol and schools do not mix,” it states.

Dr Puloka the Senior Health Promotion Strategist with HPF says when it comes to students, especially younger ones they often copy what they see adults are doing.

He says the big issue with drinking alcohol in a school setting was the role-modelling and wrong message that was being sent out.

Drinking alcohol in school settings he points out is inconsistent with what schools stand for, the safe environment they provide for young people and what is taught in class.

“They are brought up to embrace school and school authority so if they see alcohol sold or consumed at fundraisers and the like, they will think drinking is normal and act by association.”

By endorsing the report the DHB, he says, is giving out a powerful statement.

“We are not interfering with choice but we’re talking about providing the right environment and setting an example

“So from the Health Promotion Forum’s perspective this is a good message and should be extended to all schools.”

Dr Puloka adds that the report’s guidelines on how schools can develop their own alcohol policies are also a step in the right direction.

“HPF supports this move wholeheartedly. The guidelines are important part of policy directions.”

Currently, there is no legislation that prohibits the selling or supplying of alcohol on school property. Boards of Trustees currently decide school policy matters.

Report author and population health adviser Rowan Manhire-Heath told Hawkes Bay Today that the DHB was concerned at the pervasiveness of alcohol promotion and had the view that when alcohol was consumed in a school setting it reinforced the inaccurate perception that it was a safe product.

According to data collected by the DHB from March 2014 to October 2017 on the educational settings and types of events where a licence to sell alcohol was granted, 39 per cent of applications were from primary or intermediate schools, 29 per cent from secondary schools and six per cent from early childhood centres.

Lower decile schools were less likely to apply for a licence and quiz, casino, bingo, movie and auction nights were the most common events where an alcohol licence was granted and young people’s attendance was anticipated.

0

News

There is evidence that the attitude towards spirituality and health is changing says Health Promotion Forum’s deputy chair Richard Egan.

 

Mr Egan who is a lecturer in health promotion at the Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago made the comment after returning from the 6th European Conference on Religion, Spirituality and Health and the 5th International Conference of the British Association for the Study of Spirituality from May 17 to 19  at Coventry University in the UK. The theme was forgiveness.

Mr Egan says when working with people and populations, there is a strong argument to include the spiritual dimension.

“Sitting within such models as Te Whare Tapa Wha, Fono Fale, total care and person-centred approaches, spirituality has often been overlooked. There is some evidence that this is changing,” he says.

“I have been working in the spirituality and research area for over a decade and applaud this renewed focus on forgiveness as an important element of spiritual care.”

Mr Egan says forgiveness has a long religious spiritual history, but a range of researchers have examined it in healthcare and developed therapeutic and educational forgiveness resources.

“In healthcare there is evidence that blame and guilt are common and has debilitating effects among healthcare professionals,” he says.

“American psychologist Professor Robert Enright argues, with research to support his claims that behind what he calls secondary effects such as anxiety, depression and even suicide is a primary effect of anger due to injustice. This primary effect it is suggested, is causal in the pathway of many illnesses, through immune system responses.“

Mr Egan says key authors in the field have developed theory-based interventions and education projects that enable people to deal with injustice.

However he points out that what this work does not do is challenge top-down policy, structures and practice that proliferates injustice and inequity.

“Perhaps forgiveness education may act in time as a bottom-up impetus for change. But certainly spirituality and its component forgiveness have place in ongoing transformation. “

 

Richard Egan is  is a lecturer in health promotion, based in the Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit, Department of Preventive & Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago. Mr Egan’s Master’s thesis examined spirituality in New Zealand state schools, his PhD thesis explored spirituality in end-of-life care and he has qualifications in theology, English literature, religious studies, and public health.

 

0

News

A residential weekend/retreat to explore anti-racism and our Tiriti o Waitangi responsibilities to Māori will be held in Auckland in November.

 

Master Class: Strengthening Anti-Racism Praxis is an interactive programme tailored to participants with a focus on fostering practical strategies to eliminate racism.

The retreat to be held from November 9  to 11 at Kotare: Centre for Social Change, Hoteo North is a safe space tailored to participants with a focus on fostering practical strategies to eliminate racism.

It includes technical input, skill-sharing, problem-solving, planning, network building and time with activist elders.

The facilitators are Susan da Silva, Dr Heather Came and Italian/English activist, Miriam Gioia Sessa.

Ms da Silva is well-known in Northland and throughout New Zealand for her work with te Tiriti o Waitangi issues. She has worked with organisations nationally, regionally and locally providing professional development for staff working in early childhood, social services and health services.

Since her arrival in Northland, Susan has worked as the Paediatric Social Worker for the Northland DHB and, after 15 years at NorthTec, she is now a Social Worker at Whangarei Boys High School.

Dr Came is a seventh generation New Zealander with an extensive  background in the health sector and social justice activism.

An activist scholar based at Auckland University of Technology she is a member of Tāmaki Tiriti Workers and founding member of STIR: Stop Institutional Racism.

Miriam Gioia Sessa is an Italian/English activist who began feminist and social justice activism at 14 while living Rome. She is currently working in the sexual violence sector in New Zealand.

The retreat will start at 6 pm on Friday night and finish at 2pm on Sunday.

The cost is $250 for institution and $115 for other with free registration for those coming from the South Island or overseas.

A maximum of 25 participants with a base understanding of Te Tiriti o Waitangi is required.

Contact heather.came@yahoo.co.nz  or 021 539063 for registration form and more details.

 

 

 

0

News

 

A great learning experience, an eye-opener and thoroughly enjoyable were some of the comments from participants who attended a health promotion course in Auckland recently.

The Manukau Institute of Technology Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion was held in two four-day blocks from April 17 to 20 and May 15 to 18.

The part-time short course introduces students to the principles, concepts and practice of health promotion and relates theory to their own experiences, knowledge and skills.

Participants agreed that what they learned at the course was invaluable in their day-to-day work and they all gained a deeper understanding and an appreciation of what health promotion was all about.

Limiva Fonmanu a health worker with Mobile Chronic Disease Management, K’aute Pasifika Health Unit said she thoroughly enjoyed the whole two blocks of learning.

“The teaching by Trevor is so amazing and he has a unique approach to helping us understand things, especially with his vast knowledge around Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to health promotion.  I have done some courses whereby te Tiriti has been included and explained but not to this depth and many things were clarified.

“In my line of work as a community health worker I do a lot of health education but through this course, I noted that it is mainly individual-based,” said Limiva.  “After learning about the Ottawa Charter to the extent we did made me look back at how I am doing things with my community and what things I can do to better my service for them in terms of health promotion.

“This is a course that I will surely recommend for fellow colleagues to do especially with the amount of information there is to gain.”

Tomairangi Chaffey-Aupouri a student at Waikato University said she was able to gain a deeper understanding of how health promotion worked in relation to te Tiriti.

“I learned heaps at the course, it was awesome,” she said.

Avalu Tausala of the Akihuho Trust said learning about the Ottawa Charter and the determinants of health were important for her because she was studying to be a social worker and was writing a report on diabetes.

“Some people questioned the connection between diabetes and social work but doing this course helped me to gain a deeper understanding that it is all related.”

Participants wrapped up the course with team presentations that showcased not only what they had learned and understood but how creatively they were able to get their message across to their audience.

They divided into two groups and had 25 minutes to present their selected topics which were alcoholism and rheumatic fever. Working as groups with allotted time limits enhanced their ability to collaborate as a team, think creatively and out-of-the-box and manage their time effectively they all agreed.

The team presentation was a great chance to be able to work closely with other people she didn’t know, said Tomairangi.

“Coming from Gisborne we all know each other,” she laughed. “Developing personal skills was a good part of the group discussion as well as effective time management.”

“Everyone’s Mauri Ora was uplifted after the presentations,” said Avalu.

Cleopatra Matthews of the Women’s Health Trust said the presentations were good for team bonding and there were no butting of heads. “Everyone had a voice.”

The course covers the meaning of health promotion, determinants of health, the application of Te Tiriti o Waitangi to health promotion, the Ottawa Charter, an overview of key health promotion strategies and skills, values and ethics and learning and study skills.

In the photo:

ENTHUSIASTIC: Front from left, Trevor Simpson, tutor, Mita Tupaea, Te Kaha o Te Rangatahi (Whanau o Tamaki Makaurau), Letari Tepana, Te Ahurei a Rangatahi Trust, Te One Matthews, Te Kaha o Te Rangatahi (Whanau o Tamaki Makaurau), Emma Frost, Health Promotion Forum’s Activities Coordinator and Office Manager and Leonora Houma, Solomon Islands of Waikato. Back, Cleopatra Matthews, Women’s Health Trust, Jessica Gosche, Waikato District Health Board, Tomairangi Chaffey-Aupouri, Waikato University, Avalu Tausala, Akihuho Trust, Lilly Rawiri, Te Kaha o Te Rangatahi and Limiva Fonmanu, Mobile Chronic Disease Management, K’aute Pasifika Health Unit.

 

 

 

0

Competencies

With registrations open for two health promotion workshops next month now is your chance to get in and boost your health promotion competency.

The Māori Concepts of Health Promotion workshop will be held in Blenheim on June 1 and the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Auckland on June 15.

The Māori Concepts workshop aims to introduce participants to shared understandings of traditional Māori concepts, ideologies and practices in relation to health and wellbeing.

Additionally the workshop will consider how these ideas may be used to inform modern-day approaches to Māori health promotion planning, implementation and evaluation.

Course facilitator and deputy director of the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), Trevor Simpson says Maori identity is the key philosophy behind the workshop.

“The course looks at world views and how those traditional world views can inform contemporary Māori practice,” says Mr Simpson.

The workshop will be held at St John, Marlborough, 93 Seymour St, Blenheim from 9.30am to 3.30pm.

The Pasifika Health Promotion workshop will focus on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective and will trace the history of Pacific health promotion in New Zealand and discuss how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

It aims to equip Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools to address the social determinants of health and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to take control of their health and wellbeing.

Course facilitator, Dr Viliami Puloka says although the course looked at how non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer impacted the wellbeing of the Pacific community the emphasis was not on sickness or disease but on the contributing factors.

“The disease aspect will come in only as a result of what contributed to it,” says Dr Puloka who is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion.

“Physical health is just a bit of what makes you healthy. We are looking at health as a resource of living rather than a destination you arrive at. In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.”

The workshop will be held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre.

To register or for more information contact Emma Frost at emma@hauora.co.nz or 09 300 3734.

 

0

Global, Maori health promotion

Having Te Reo Maori as one of the four official languages of the World Conference on Health Promotion in New Zealand next year is a world-first for Maori and other Indigenous cultures.

The 23rd IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All will be held in Rotorua from April 7-11.

Like the other dying languages of the 370 million Indigenous peoples of the world, Te Reo Maori is the repository for the Maori culture – values, knowledge, practices and history.

Sione Tui’tahi, the conference co-chair and Executive Director of the Health Promotion Forum which is the local co-host, says having Te Reo Maori as one of the four official languages of the conference is one way of acknowledging the rights of Indigenous peoples.

“Te Reo Maori is the native tongue of Maori, the Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand.  It is also one of the official languages of our country,” says Mr Tui’tahi.

“Given that we are co-hosting this world conference, it is only right that we honour Te Reo Maori this way, especially when it is rights guaranteed for Tangata Whenua under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the founding document of modern New Zealand.”

One of the underlying themes of the conference, Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development can offer solutions to our global challenges today, adds Mr Tu’itahi. “Indigenous knowledge enunciates that humanity and its environment are one. But we are confronted by environmental challenges, including climate changes, because of our dominant mainstream approach of separating humanity from the rest of the environment and exploiting the latter for our socio-economic gains.”

Trevor Simpson, the Deputy Executive Director/Senior Health Promotion Strategist (with Portfolio in Māori development) says “for the first time an indigenous plenary speaker will address the IUHPE World Conference in our indigenous language, Te Reo Maori”.

“This in turn will be simultaneously translated into the other three official languages of the conference – English, French and Spanish. This presents a wonderful opportunity for Aotearoa, New Zealand to take a leading role in building indigenous notions of health promotion through promoting the use of indigenous language.”

Mr Simpson points out that Maori Health Promotion is premised on the idea that world views and cultural identity are central and imperative to achieving positive Maori health outcomes.

“Te Reo Maori provides the basis for understanding how these views are formed in the first place and also illustrates how identity, language and wellbeing are intertwined.”

The conference theme sets the direction and intent of the conference that will attract health professionals, development experts, policy-makers and other professional leaders to Rotorua, the first city to be bi-lingual, and also the cultural capital of New Zealand.

A highly educational and informative scientific programme is being drafted while an equally attractive social programme is being shaped up.

 

0

Global, Uncategorized

Abstracts for the World Conference on Health Promotion that will be held in New Zealand next year must be in by August 31.

Submissions for the 23rd International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) World Conference on Health Promotion to be held in Rotorua from April 7 to 11 can be made in English, Spanish, French and Te Reo Māori.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is hosting the conference in association with the IUHPE.

The approximate date of acceptance of abstracts is October 22 and all abstracts must be submitted through this online form.

All abstract submitters, including individual contributors, are encouraged to interact and collaborate with other presenters and participants wherever possible. Participatory, collaborative and non-traditional session formats will be given priority in the selection process.

Abstracts can be submitted in eight different formats: symposium; workshop;  research oral/poster presentation; innovation in policy and practice oral/poster presentation; round table discussion; alternative showing/new technology;  alternative showing/art and lunch with an author.

The committee is encouraging submissions to match the sub-themes of the conference. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the four conference sub-themes:

Health equity 
Ensure health equity throughout the life course, within and among countries, making each member of the global society an empowered lifelong learner.

Inclusive habitats 
Make all urban and other habitats inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and conducive to health and wellbeing.

Climate change adaptation strategies 
Design and implement effective and fair climate change adaptation strategies.

Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance 
Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance at all levels that promotes, peace, justice and respect of human rights.

For further information on each of these formats please click here.

 

 

0

Maori health promotion

Plans are underway to develop a training manual from a Te Tiriti-based health promotion resource that has been well received by health promoters.

Dr Heather Came who is one of the authors of Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion says the manual is currently in development with another of the booklet’s authors, Dr Nicole Coupe leading the work.

“We need to regroup and talk about it but the intention is that we are keen to find folk willing to extend the reach of the resource,” says Dr Came, who has worked for nearly 25 years in health promotion, public and Māori health and has had a long involvement in social justice activism.

Aimed at the health promotion workforce, the free resource which is published by STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) was launched in Auckland on January 28 this year and is available online and in print. It builds on the legacy of Dr Irihapeti Ramsden and cultural safety in nursing.

Dr Came, who is a senior lecturer based in the Taupua Waiora Māori  Health Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology says they have had feedback that the resource is useful and academics have been using it as a teaching tool.

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi … if you’re following the treaty than you’re not practising racism,” she said.

“It’s a smorgasbord of ideas about how to implement te Tiriti in your practice.”

Dr Came says however that the debate over te Tiriti continues to evolve as evidenced by the Waitangi Tribunal’s finding in 2014 that Ngapuhi did not cede their sovereignty when they signed te Tiriti in 1840.

 

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi.”

Dr Heather Came

 

“So the intention was to add to and strengthen the resource every five years as things continue to evolve,” she explains.

Although the resource is written for practitioners, teachers and those working in the health promotion field Dr Came believes it would be of interest to people outside the sector, as well as a Tau Iwi audience.

Well-known and respected Māori activist and lawyer from Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Porou specialising in Treaty and constitutional issues, Moana Jackson says in the booklet’s foreword it is appropriate that the resource is dedicated to Dr Irihapeti Ramsden.

“As a nurse and deep-thinking philosopher she was committed to finding practical ways to give effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi; especially in health,” says Mr Jackson.

“Her promotion of the concept of cultural safety in nursing recognised the power dynamics at play in any relationship between health professionals and those in their care. In a very real sense it was based in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and was thus a recognition that the Tiriti-Treaty relationship is also about power.”

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved … and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

Moana Jackson

Mr Jackson said the resource built upon that recognition and in a carefully considered and practical way offers guidance for all who work in the health sector to manage and develop their Treaty-based practice in ways that recognise the power relationships it enshrines.

He acknowledged that the resource was timely as it reflected the evolving understanding of te Tiriti that has occurred since the 1970s.

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved in compiling and editing this resource and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

STIR is a group of senior public health practitioners and activist researchers who aim to end racism in the public health sector.

Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director of The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), one of the supporters of the resource, said “we are proud to be party to the development of this resource because te Tiriti and the Ottawa Charter are the two documents upon which health promotion is based in New Zealand”.

“Māori health promotion contributes, among other things, indigenous opportunities, values and tools to health promotion which enrich our understanding of health promotion in New Zealand and the rest of the world.”

Deputy Executive Director of HPF, Trevor Simpson, whose interests are in raising the profile of Māori issues particularly in the areas of health and matters of social importance, is one of the authors of the resource.

The other authors are: Grant Berghan, Claire Doole, Dr Jonathan Fay and Dr Tim McCreanor.

More about Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion

The resource which is inspired by activist scholarship and explores the ways in which senior health promoters work with the articles of te Tiriti and its aspirations starts by outlining the importance of te Tiriti to health promotion practice in Aotearoa. It then sets out the research method on which this resource is based, and from which deeper engagement is advocated with te Tiriti-based practice, anti-racism and decolonisation.

“We locate te Tiriti as a sequel to Her Wakaputanga o Nu Tireni (the Declaration of Independence). We next orient readers to each of the articles of the Maori text of te Tiriti as it relates to health promotion in Aotearoa … Under each article of te Tiriti we introduce relevant research, information from this study and insights from the authors’ experiences related to te Tiriti. The final section draws out the core elements of Tiriti-based practice,” write the authors.

 

0

Global

A top line-up of speakers from around the world and New Zealand has been confirmed for the world health promotion conference in Rotorua, New Zealand next year.

The theme of the 23rd IHUPE (International Union for Health Promotion and Education) Health conference to be held from April 7 to 11 is Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is co-hosting the conference which is expected to be attended by 2000 delegates from all over the world..

Co-chairs of the conference Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director, Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand and Graham Robertson, President, IUHPE, say the conference will be invaluable for those in the sector to exchange knowledge and build networks in order to: share strategies, policies and practices; present results and assess progress; influence policy and bring about positive change and promote health and equity amongst all people.

The chance to hear from internationally-recognised speakers such as Professor Anthony Capon from the University of Sydney and Professor Fran Baum from Flinders University, Adelaide is also too good an opportunity to miss.

Prof Capon is the world’s first professor of planetary health and an authority on environmental health and health promotion while Prof Baum from Flinders University, Adelaide is one of Australia’s leading researchers on the social and economic determinants of health.

Prof Capon, who was born in New Zealand and moved to Brisbane with his family when he was a young boy, is a public health physician with more than 25 years of senior leadership experience, spanning academic, policy and practice roles.

“Planetary health is about safeguarding the health and wellbeing of current and future generations through good stewardship of Earth’s natural systems and by rethinking the way we feed, move, house, power, and care for the world (something missing here?), “ Professor Capon told Lancet recently.

Capon thinks that, “the central challenge of planetary health is to greatly reduce per capita resource consumption in high-income countries (HICs) to make room for further sustainable development in other countries”.

He also told the journal that: “If everyone in the world lived as the average Australian does, we would need four or five planets … we urgently need to contract per capita consumption in HICs to about 20% of what it is now so that all people can have a fair share of the Earth. And with less focus on materialism, we may indeed lead more fulfilling, and healthier, lives in tune with nature for the world.”

The former director of the global health institute at United Nations University (UNU-IIGH) has also since 2008 advised the International Council for Science on its global interdisciplinary science programme on health and wellbeing in the changing urban environment using systems approaches.

Prof Baum is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Foundation Director of the Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity at Flinders University.

Prof Baum was named in the Queen’s Birthday 2016 Honours List as an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for “distinguished service to higher education as an academic and public health researcher, as an advocate for improved access to community health care, and to professional organisations”.

Prof Baum told ABC Online, in an article on mental illness and poverty last month, that reducing levels of mental distress, and closing health inequalities, would require a rethinking of Australia’s direction as a society.

“I would have thought in the last 30 years, when rates of anxiety and depression have gone up in Western countries, there’s some clear clues from the economic system and society we’re creating.”

This system includes a dramatic rise in precarious and casualised work, a trend Prof Baum says could exacerbate pressures of powerlessness and poverty.

According to ABC Online she is writing a book on the subject of health inequality, and one of the unavoidable conclusions of her research is that health reform is political.

Her preliminary recommendations include reducing economic inequality, making public education free and available to all and providing more affordable and secure housing, to name a few.

Prof Baum holds grants from the National Health & Medical Research Council and the Australia Research Council which are considering a wide range of aspects of health inequities and social determinants of health.  These grants include an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence on Policies for Health Equity of which she is one of the two co-directors.

Her book, The New Public Health (4th ed. published January 2016 Oxford University Press), is widely cited and used in many public health courses.

Other speakers confirmed for the conference are:  Anne Bunde-Birouste, director of the UNSW Yunus Social Business for Health Hub; Dr Trevor Hancock, a public health physician and health promotion consultant from the University of Victoria, Canada; Patrick Mwesigye Sewa, founder and team leader at the Uganda Youth and Adolescents Health Forum; Colin Tukuitonga, Director General of the Pacific Community and Dr Stanley Vollant who practises  at the Notre-Dame community hospital in Montreal.

The IUHPE world conferences are renowned events for bringing together leading professionals in all corners of the world to take stock of the present state of knowledge and experiences, bring forward future challenges and shape the agenda to advance developments in health promotion.

Every three years, the conference defines the “state of the art” in health promotion practice, research, and theory.

The aim of the 2019 conference is to provide an unparalleled opportunity to link and demonstrate the contribution of health promotion to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and to acknowledge the way SDGs contribute to improvements in health and wellbeing.

To find out more please click here.

 

0

News

Registrations are open so get in quick for the chance to attend and boost your health promotion competency at the Pasifika Health Promotion Workshop in Auckland on June 15.

The Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) workshop to be held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre from 9.30am to 3.30pm will focus on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective.

The workshop will trace the history of Pacific health promotion in New Zealand and discuss how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

It aims to equip Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools to address the social determinants of health and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to take control of their health and wellbeing.

Course facilitator, Dr Viliami Puloka said although the course looked at how non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer impacted the wellbeing of the Pacific community the emphasis was not on sickness or disease but on the contributing factors.

Dr Puloka said being healthy was not just about the absence of sickness but about a complete sense of wellbeing.

“So the disease aspect will come in only as a result of what contributed to it. Physical health is just a bit of what makes you healthy. We are looking at health as a resource of living rather than a destination you arrive at,” he said.

“In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.”

The workshop is primarily designed for health workers working with Pacific communities. Pacific community leaders and non-Pacific health workers who are working with Pacific communities are encouraged to join the workshop.

If you would like to attend please click here to complete the online registration form.

Contact Emma Frost for further information on emma@hauora.co.nz or 09 300 3734

Dr Puloka is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion. For more on Dr Puloka click here.

0

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
ErrorHere