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Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Runanga Whakapiki Ake i te Hauora o Aotearoa
Community, Environment, Global, Uncategorized

HPF’s Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi talks to Hauora about the outcomes, goals and lasting impact of the global Health Promotion Forum conference in Rotorua from April 7-11, 2019

Last April the Health Promotion Forum co-hosted the 23rd International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) World Conference on Health Promotion in Rotorua. With a timely theme of ‘Hauora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All’, more than a 1000 delegates and organisations from 73 countries participated.

H: There has been very positive feedback about the conference. Are you happy with the results, and did you achieve the outcomes you set?

Sione Tu’itahui speaking at IUHPE2019

ST: Yes, I am happy to say we achieved our three major outcomes, and more. The knowledge that was exchanged was very relevant, crucial and very timely for the needs of health promotion, and the world today. Health promoters and other health workers, as well as those who work in sustainable development enhanced existing networks and formed new ones. And the legacy initiatives of two legacy statements, and initiating the process for a healthy city, were also achieved.

H: Let’s talk more about those outcomes in details. What is some of the relevant knowledge shared?

ST: Among other important features, at least three major areas emerged and moved closer together, offering comprehensive knowledge and practical tools for the delegates to take home and implement on addressing the health of the planet and its peoples. These were the social determinants of health with an equity and social justice approach, planetary health and ecological determinants with an eco-social approach and an inter-generational understanding and goal for health and wellbeing, and indigenous knowledge and health promotion with a clear philosophy and practice that humans are inseparable from the ecology. On another level, the spiritual dimension of wellbeing, and spiritual health promotion also came to the fore during the conference. It was great to see these major areas of health knowledge coming together, offering a profound understanding on planetary health, and relevant, practical tools.

What was significant was that the presenters in all these areas of knowledge were complementary in their addresses, presenting a balanced, and comprehensive big picture of where the health of the planet and its peoples are at, and the comprehensive set of strategies to address those challenges at all levels.

H: What else was significant about the knowledge shared at the conference?

ST: Two other significant contents of the conference were the leading contributions of Maori research, policy, practice and leadership to Indigenous health promotion, and how pronounced climate change and ecological challenges are in our Pacific region. In fact, we decided to host the conference here in order for our New Zealand knowledge and experience to be shared with the world, and for the world to understand our greater Pacific region and its challenges, as well as our collective effort to address those challenges. For example, 20 years after introducing Te Pae Mahutonga as a health promotion model for New Zealand, Sir Mason Durie presented a new model, Matariki, at the conference for Indigenous peoples. Tuhoe Nation Leader Tamati Kruger shared the challenging but progressive and resilient journey of his tribe from the ravages of colonisation to mana motu hake/autonomy today. Delegates were in awe at such profound knowledge and courageous, moral leadership.

H: You mentioned some legacy initiatives. What are they?

ST: There were three legacy initiatives: two legacy statements, and Rotorua to become a healthy city under the WHO (World Health Organization) scheme of the same name.  Led by two editorial teams, the conference delegates drafted and approved by acclamation the two statements on the final day. The first statement is the Rotorua Statement which summarises the important themes and knowledge that emerged from the conference, calling for action on those crucial areas for the health and wellbeing of the planet and its peoples. The second statement is the Waiora Indigenous Peoples Statement. It outlines the loss of Indigenous peoples under colonisation around the world, and calls for privileging indigenous knowledge as a right, and articulates how Indigenous health promotion can contribute to addressing the challenges on planetary health. On the healthy initiative, Rotorua’s mayor Steve Chadwick agreed to explore with us how Rotorua can become a ‘healthy city’ under the WHO’s scheme of the same name. Rotorua can be the model for other cities. All social, economic, cultural and ecological challenges, health included, are related, and cities are a manageable setting where these challenges can be addressed in a well-coordinated and effective way. The vision is for our cities to become healthy, liveable and sustainable.

H: So, it was not just a talkfest?

ST: No, certainly not. You can watch the videos of those keynote speakers on the IUHPE and HPF YouTube channels. Maori equity and social justice were articulated by the likes of Sir Michael Marmot and Fran Baum, indigenous health promotion was clearly embedded by the addresses by Sir Mason Durie, Tamati Kruger of Tuhoe Nation, Dame Anne Salmond, and Professor Anthony Capon. Professor Capon and Professor Trevor Hancock also highlighted planetary health, ecological determinants and the eco-social approach. 

H: What lessons have you learned as a result of hosting the conference?

ST: Quite a few. One is that our nation’s founding document, Te Tiriti o Waitangi, was very effective as a framework for negotiating the terms of the conference and for co-hosting it with the International Union for Health Promotion and Education. Using Te Tiriti enables us to work as equal partners, sharing our knowledge and experience, and achieving outcomes agreed on, such as the theme of the conference where we highlight Indigenous knowledge, having Te Reo Maori as one of the four languages of the conference.

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Mental health

The Wellbeing Budget announcements indicate that the Government is starting to take mental health seriously, says Zoe Hawke, Mental Health Foundation manager of the Policy and Advocacy and Community Engagement, Health Promotion team.

Zoe Hawke

Ms Hawke who is the Chair of the Health Promotion Forum says the creation of a $1.9 billion mental health package and the Health Minister’s acknowledgement that more funding will be needed over multiple years are evidence of the Government’s commitment.

She refers to significant points made by the Government in the Budget as overall a promising start in addressing mental wellbeing and the number of deaths from suicide, but adds that much more will be needed to turn things around.

“The Budget did try to acknowledge the significance of the suicide prevention issues for Māori, as well as those of Pasifika and Rainbow communities (more could have been done in these areas, and many people will continue to advocate for more, including myself).

“I will also be keeping my eye on the resources for schools pledge, and whether they  also go to kura kaupapa, kohanga and wharekura to ensure equity of outcomes.  Additionally I hope to see that the ongoing development of the workforce includes a well-resourced cultural responsiveness training component,” says Ms Hawke.    

“Fingers crossed we see a continued follow through in future budget commitments to address inequalities that have persisted for way too many years, and which cannot and will not be solved through one budget alone.”  

Ms Hawke says the Wellbeing Budget provides some more context to the Government’s response to He Ara Oranga (the report of the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction), which was released the day before budget announcements.

“In their response to He Ara Oranga the Government accepted in principle, or agreed to further consideration of 38 of the 40 recommendations of the Inquiry Panel.  However many had concerns that the detail was missing on what this would look like. The Wellbeing Budget that followed gave some reassurances  to the mental health sector, and now our work begins on ensuring the implementation of the 38 recommendations and associated funding streams is done effectively.”

Significant points made by the Government in the Wellbeing Budget include:

  • Funding the establishment of a new Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission provides leadership to hold the government accountable for on-going investment and progress.
  • The Wellbeing Budget shows the start of a commitment to tackle key social determinants of mental health such as housing, child poverty, and family and sexual violence.
  • Acknowledgement of the considerable mental health inequities Māori face. Commitment to address this through allowing a flexible approach to service design and delivery. Iwi based and other Kaupapa Māori services are acknowledged and their development is supported in the plans for major new services for early support for people with mild to moderate needs.
  • Funding of up to eight programmes designed to strengthen personal identity and connection to the community and will also scale up successful kaupapa Māori initiatives
  • On-going development of the mental health workforce
  • Acknowledgment that one size does not fit all and the importance of co-design of services with local communities, people with lived experience of mental distress and the wider mental health sector.
  • Investment of $40 million into suicide prevention.
  • Support for resources to be made available to teachers to promote mental resilience in primary and intermediate schools.
  • Four free sessions of counselling for people bereaved by suicide
  • Acknowledgement that media guidelines needs to be supported (this is important because the evidence is clear that the way we kōrero about suicide in the media can contribute to further harm in our communities).
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Global, Maori, Maori health promotion

Twenty years after introducing “Te Pae Mahutonga” as a framework for health promotion in New Zealand at an HPF conference in 1999, Sir Mason Durie introduced another star-based framework to guide health promotion for Maori and other Indigenous peoples.

Sir Mason Durie

Sir Mason introduced “Matariki” at the 23rd World Conference on Health Promotion in Rotorua, last April.

“Matariki is the Māori name for the cluster of stars also known as the Pleiades (or Subaru in Japan). It rises in mid-winter and for many Māori, it heralds the start of a new year, a time for remembering the dead, celebrating new life and planting new crops,” he said. “The focus on stars reminds us that we are part of an unbounded universe.”

Based on the eight main stars in the cluster, he named eight Matariki dimensions of health: Mana Tangata -Human dignity,  Whānau Ora – Families,  Hapori – Communities, Ranginui – The sky,  Papatuanuku- The land,  Nga Wai – Rivers and oceans, Ngahere – The forests, and Te Ao Tuturu – Rhythms of nature.

“Matariki provides a health promotion agenda for Māori and Indigenous peoples that endorse Indigenous rights, keep our skies clean and fresh, protect our lands, preserve our native forests, enable whānau and families to flourish, support community initiatives, safeguard our rivers and ocean, and restore nature’s balance, ” Sir Mason asserts.

He also pointing out that when combined, the six stars of Te Pae Mahutonga and the eight stars of Matariki can continue to guide health promotion for Indigenous peoples into the future.

Details of Sir Mason’s presentation can be found on the IUHPE2019 website.

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Competencies

Two students who attended the Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion course last October, say the course was an invaluable learning experience.

Abraham Larsen, the Health Improvement Advisor, Education Team at Toi Te Ora Public Health in the Bay of Plenty, Lakes District said he found the Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion course especially helpful as he had only been in public health a few months.

“It helped me to ‘bed in’ concepts and terminology that I’d heard throughout my entry into the PHU I work for,” he explained.


Abraham Larsen and Ifalame Teisi appreciated how much they learned about health promotion at the short course

“Through connecting with other participants from different areas, I was able to see the breadth of public health and how it can be practised in Aotearoa. I was also inspired by the passion of the other participants.”

A highlight for Mr Larsen was the facilitation by the course coordinator HPF’s deputy executive director Trevor Simpson.

“Not only did Trevor share his vast amount of knowledge, he was able to weave in our own experiences and stories in order to whakamana the participants.”

Mr Larsen also appreciated being with other participants from different areas.

“I was able to see the breadth of public health and how it can be practised in Aotearoa.”

Church leader, Mr Teisi said he would highly recommend the course to social and community workers who love working with families within Maori and Pacific Islands communities.

He said he now felt more confident when dealing with the community.

“I learned a great deal about health and wellbeing and strategies of how to promote community-based views towards health and wellbeing.”

Mr Teisi said he now had knowledge of what health promotion is and how it differed  from health education for example.

“I highly recommend this course to social and community workers who love working with families within our Maori and Pacific Islands communities.”

Apply now to gain your Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion. Enrolment applications need to be submitted before the course start date.

Location:       WELLINGTON
Date:              
BLOCK ONE: Tuesday 29 October – Friday 1 November, 2019
                        BLOCK TWO: Tuesday 26 – Friday 29 November, 2019
Venue:            Sisters of Compassion, 2 Rhine St, Island Bay.
Map
Cost:               $512.50 Members and Non-Members
                       
A limited number of scholarships are available. Please contact
emma@hauora.co.nz or phone 09 300 3734 for an application or for more information. Criteria conditions apply.

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Global, Pacific
Dr Viliami Puloka

Dr Viliami Puloka, HPF’s Pacific Strategist looks back at the amazing Pacific experience at IUHPE2019 in Rotorua.

Fakafeta’I, malo lava, vinaka vakalevu are the words that come to mind – hearts full of joy and gratitude to be part of this world-wide event right here at home in Aotearoa New Zealand.

All the Pacific participants especially those from the islands were so thrilled and appreciative of the fact that they did not have to paddle far to get here. It was only a three-hour flight from Tonga, Fiji, Samoa, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Solomon Islands and New Caledonia. It confirmed the fact that Aotearoa is squarely part of the Pacific islands. 

Arriving in Rotorua was heart-warming to many who thought New Zealand was the land of the palangi.  But all were excited to meet and share the experience of their Maori cousins. Many commented on the spiritual experience they had during the Powhiri, which reminded them of their own version at home.

Some were moved to tears when exchanges the “breath of life” with Maori delegates while walking between sessions or at various meeting venues.

We really felt at home and immediately identified with our Maori cousins and their environment. When Tamati Kurger spoke, we were already in awe, excited, joyful, appreciative and motivated for action. It was a big deal for us to come in to a very enabling, encouraging and empowering environment. That really prepared our hearts and minds to focus on the contents of the conference.

Pacific Community (SPC) commitment and partnership through sponsorship of participants to attend, give presentations led by the Director General Colin Tukuitoga as one of the Plenary speakers shows great leadership and very much appreciated.

 A highlight for Pacific Youth was the SPC Pacific Youth WAKE UP art project unfolds itself through out the days of the conference. It was a call on young people to wake up to the facts that “today is the tomorrow you dreamt about yesterday”. What you do today as far as Noncommunicable diseases are concerned will return to haunt you at your later years.

WAKE UP NOW!

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Global, Maori, Maori health promotion
Mr Simpson is one of the principal architects of the Waiora Indigenous Statement

HPF’s Deputy Executive Director Trevor Simpson, one of the principal architects of the Waiora Indigenous Statement reflects on its significance

The Waiora Indigenous Statement adopted at this year’s IUHPE World Conference in Rotorua provided a watershed moment for indigenous health promotion at the global level. It is a call to action which leverages on the assertion that indigenous people’s perspectives, worldviews and human experience informs a “new” way to think about health promotion and by virtue of this, a different perspective on planetary health and human wellbeing.

Of course, health promotion in its current format, largely based on western world views associates human health with the health of the planet. The Ottawa Charter identifies eight prerequisites, the fundamental conditions for health amongst which a stable eco-system and sustainable resources are but two. As broad fields of study these two areas remain vitally important, but it seems odd that planetary health and wellbeing is not specifically addressed within the existing health promotion framework. From observation it is more implied than defined. Further, it is difficult to discern where health promotion makes a clear and concerted effort to think past the Anthropocene, the current focus on an individual, human centred approach to health.

The Waiora Indigenous Statement provides some interesting componentry to help us understand at a fundamental level where indigenous thinking positions itself in the planetary and human wellbeing discussion. As the document rightfully points out, indigenous people and worldviews are diverse. However, when we overlay these aspects of diversity, we can then identify the commonalities which draw indigenous peoples together.

This provides a powerful construct, particularly when we centre on the core features; the interactive relationship between the spiritual and material realms, intergenerational and collective alignments and that the Mother Earth is a living being. It posits that Planet Earth and human beings have a special relationship to each other, one founded on interconnectedness and interdependence. We are therefore in the indigenous perspective, part of nature and not above it.

In a pre-conference discussion with Tamati Kruger, one of the highly acclaimed plenary speakers at this year’s event, he touched on a key principle of the Tuhoe Iwi’s Waitangi claim settlement outcome, principally the section in the Te Urewera Act 2014 in which the Crown (Government of Aotearoa New Zealand) and the Tuhoe people agreed that the Urewera (previously the Urewera National Park) was a “living person”. He suggests that this aspect was an imperative in the settlement negotiations. Without it, it would have been very difficult to reach an agreement.

As a significant precedent in law it is also nevertheless an assertion of world views.

It comes with a necessary proviso of course, duties on both parties: a living person should be cared for and nurtured. Care and nurture have in turn strong elements of responsibility and obligation. Indigenous Tuhoe people, therefore, have no choice but to provide for and nurture their piece of nature and in return have their place and wellbeing secured. As Tamati said in his plenary speech in Rotorua, “the Tuhoe people do not own the Urewera. The Urewera owns itself”.

This indigenous viewpoint leaves much to ponder. It questions our current thinking. It touches on the need for a paradigm shift in the way human beings see themselves in their relationship with this living planet. And it is now urgent.

As a living document we encourage all to endorse, use and critically analyse the Waiora Indigenous Statement. It is an offering for health promoters, policy makers and leaders. An intergenerational gift that seeks to define what health promotion means from an indigenous worldview. It is also a very useful resource to inform the development of health promotion itself- to be part of the actual framework rather than sitting outside it. To be part of a new design for people and planet.

The Waiora Indigenous Statement is a statement for all. It asks that we make space for and privilege indigenous peoples voices and indigenous knowledge in promoting planetary health and wellbeing. It offers a new way of thinking, resetting the course for health promotion and sustainable development. It suggests that if we listen carefully, we just might hear something beautiful and profound. Something to learn, something to embrace. Something for you, me and the generations to come.

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News

HPF’s Dr Viliami Puloka encouraged Tongan tertiary students at
their annual National Tertiary Students’ conference in Dunedin from July 3 to 8 to view health in a holistic way.

Health is a resource to do life and contribute to life, not the object of living

Health is not something you can buy or order online

Health is everything that you are, and you are growing it

Health will stop growing unless tender loving care (TLC) is given at all times.

These comments were made by Dr Puloka while introducing the topic of his workshop to nearly 200 Tongan students at their annual National Tertiary Students’ conference in Dunedin from July 3 to 8.

Dr Puloka’s workshop, which was one of five workshops at the conference hosted by the Otago Tongan Students’ Association, was Life and Health. The other themes were Religion, Kava, Tongan dancing and Tongan arts and crafts.

Dr Puloka said he was thankful that he represented the HPF team in contributing to the development of future leaders of Pacific communities with Tongan heritage here in New Zealand and in the islands.

He said this was an example of HPF training and exposing future Pacific leaders early to a health promotion approach.

“Young people are so important in the scheme of things, especially if we have the ability to reach them at university level. These are our future leaders.

“It’s an obligation, as well a privilege on our part to contribute to the development of these young people who will go on to become leaders in their country, families, community, church and so on. It is in our best interest to contribute and empower them to be the best leaders they can be.”

Dr Puloka encouraged the students to look at health from a holistic perspective and not to limit their view of health to just the physical. 

He explained the determinants of health and stressed that health must be grown, looked after and given TLC.

Dr Puloka was impressed with the conference atmosphere adding that it was full of energy and allowed for “very active talanoa (discussion and sharing of ideas)”.

“I was very impressed with the attendance at the workshop, 66 in total, given the fact they had their ball the night before.”

Part of the cultural day was the dancing competition in the evening.

“I was so appreciative of the students’ contribution to maintain culture, language, poetry and lots more through music and dance,” added Dr Puloka.

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News

Participants emerged from the Pacific Health Promotion workshop at EastBay REAP, Whakatane last month with a renewed sense of vigour.

Feedback from the workshop revealed those who attended the workshop felt it had reinforced their knowledge and inspired them to go back and work in their communities with more confidence and enthusiasm.

One participant said the course had “reinforced the concept of being an agent of change as opposed to telling people what to do,” while another said it “gave a very good understanding of how to work with Pacific people”.

“The Pacific angle from a Pacific presenter was great”.

The workshop was facilitated by Dr Viliami Puloka HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion.

Also acknowledged was how interactive the workshop was with a role play and personal reflections and how it covered a lot of health promotion grounds in theory and practice.

Keep your eyes peeled for the date and venue of the next workshop which will be advertised in our monthly notice and website www.hauora.co.nz.

Call 09 300 3071 or email emma@hauora.co.nz to make enquiries.

The Pacific Health Promotion – Social Determinants from a Pacific Perspective traces the history of ‘Pacific health promotion’ in Aotearoa New Zealand and discusses how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

The aim is to equip senior Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools that will enable them to address the onslaught of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to advance spiritually, socially, economically and culturally.

Participants at the Pacific Health Promotion workshop in Whakatane on June 28.
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News

STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) has made two submissions to the Government on Health & Disability Workforce Strategic Priorities and the Health Sector Review.

The submissions by STIR, which is a network of public health professionals and scholars committed to ending institutional racism in the administration of the public health sector, are endorsed by the Health Promotion Forum of NZ (HPF).

Health & Disability Workforce Strategic Priorities

The group’s submission on workforce priorities was structured in three parts: feedback on the consultation process itself; STIR’s health workforce priorities and feedback on the ministry’s health workforce priorities.

Among the concerns raised by STIR is the need for a substantially greater commitment to Māori health demonstrated through the reprioritisation of financial investment into Māori health.

STIR maintains that it wants to see greater accountability for Māori health at all levels of the health sector; from political leaders, to health management, through to contracted providers and health practitioners. People run the health system and need to be held accountable for their practice; this is a workforce issue. 

The group recommends the development of a new multi-disciplinary Māori health workforce strategy for the regulated and unregulated health workforces.

STIR points out that at a local level the ethnic make-up of the health workforce should match local population levels. For instance, in communities comprising 25% Māori, this should be mirrored in the local health workforce.

“We urge the Ministry of Health to establish a single repository for Māori health workforce data to enable tracking of progress towards targets. Ethnicity data also needs to be systematically collected across all points of the health sector to allow informed workforce planning.”

STIR would also like to see greater investment in Māori leadership programmes such as the successful Ngā Manukura o Āpōpō programme run by Digital Indigenous.

Health Sector Review

In its submission on the Health Sector Review STIR answered nine questions focusing on issues including how the best health and disability system for New Zealand might look in 2030;  changes to make the system more fair and equal for everyone and what changes could most improve health for Māori and Pacific peoples

In response to the first question STIR answered that from the authors’ perspectives there are three core values integral for the future health and disability system: A commitment to i) honour te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Māori text that reaffirmed tino rangatiratanga as opposed to the English version) , ii) embracing anti-racism praxis and iii) the pursuit of  health equity.

“These values must be reflected at all levels of the health system and engage practitioners, managers and policy makers. We must all be held accountable for our professional practice in these key areas,” STIR states.

STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) has made two submissions to the Government on Health & Disability Workforce Strategic Priorities and the Health Sector Review.

The submissions by STIR, which is a network of public health professionals and scholars committed to ending institutional racism in the administration of the public health sector, are endorsed by the Health Promotion Forum of NZ (HPF).

The group’s submission on workforce priorities was structured in three parts: feedback on the consultation process itself; STIR’s health workforce priorities and feedback on the ministry’s health workforce priorities.

STIR addresses a number of concerns including the need for a substantially greater commitment to Māori health and the development of a new multi-disciplinary Māori health workforce strategy for the regulated and unregulated health workforces.

STIR maintains that at a local level, the ethnic makeup of the health workforce should match local population levels. For instance, in communities comprising 25% Māori, this should be mirrored in the local health workforce.

In its submission on the Health Sector Review STIR answered nine questions focusing on issues like how the best health and disability system for New Zealand might look in 2030;  changes to make the system more fair and equal for everyone and what changes could most improve health for Māori and Pacific peoples.

From the authors’ perspectives there are three core values integral for the future health and disability system: A commitment to i) honour te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Māori text that reaffirmed tino rangatiratanga as opposed to the English version) , ii) embracing anti-racism praxis and iii) the pursuit of  health equity.

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News

A new law that will be passed to ban smoking and vaping in cars carrying children has been welcomed by health advocates who have been lobbying for legislative change for years.

The law change will come into effect by an amendment to the Smoke-free Environments Act 1990 and the ban is expected to come into effect by the end of the year.

The Government’s Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa who made the announcement recently said although the change was about protecting children it was also part of the Government’s commitment to achieving Smokefree 2025.

“Too many New Zealand children, particularly Māori and Pacific children, are exposed to second-hand smoke in the vehicles they usually travel in.

“Public education and social marketing campaigns over many years have had some impact, but the rate of reduction in children exposed to smoking in vehicles is slowing. It is now time to do more by legislating,” says Ms Salesa.

“The legislation will also be backed up with a new and innovative public education and social marketing effort. Ultimately, the focus of this change will be on education and changing social norms – not on issuing infringement notices,”

Trevor Simpson the Deputy Executive Director of the Health Promotion Forum of NZ says smoke-free cars is a natural progression towards a smoke-free Aotearoa 2025.

“In a very simple way we can use policy to protect the health of our children and our whanau. At the same time, we can normalise smoke-free cars in a similar way to how we have normalised seatbelts in cars.”

The move has also been welcomed by Children’s Commissioner Andrew Becroft, who said it could benefit 100,000 Kiwi kids every week.

“Once this legislation is passed [children] will no longer be forced to inhale this chemical poison,” Becroft said.

Hāpai Tobacco Control Manager, Mihi Blair, says the law change is a “no-brainer”.

“If the police educate themselves on local services and enable whānau to access support then they shouldn’t need to take a punitive approach unless absolute necessary.”

Under the change, Police will be able to require people to stop smoking in their cars if children (under 18) are present. Police will also be able to use their discretion to give warnings, refer people to stop-smoking support services, or issue an infringement fee of $50.

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News

Wednesday, February 6 is Waitangi Day, a time to reflect on our past and present, but more importantly, the future of our nation, our relationship to each other as peoples of diverse backgrounds, and our relationship with our environment.

Almost 180 years ago, under the world-wide impact of the forces of colonisation and imperialism, two peoples and two different cultures met in the northern region of Aotearoa New Zealand. The discussion that took place focused on an arrangement between two sovereign nations. An agreement was forged in the form of an international treaty. Without the benefit of foresight no one at the time could have envisaged that the world and wellbeing of the hosting Indigenous peoples, Maori, was so deeply imperilled.

Partly premised on a concern for the wellbeing of Maori, a treaty, Te Tiriti of Waitangi was signed by representatives of the English Crown and Maori chiefs. Although the Tiriti was drafted in the languages of the two signing parties, the translated texts were not identical leading to misinterpretation and later, conflict. History shows that the agreement was not honoured by the English Crown, their representatives and the immigrant groups that settled in Aotearoa New Zealand. This betrayal led to a catastrophic impact on Maori, especially the loss of resources and culture – from land and societal institutions to values, knowledge and way of life. The imprint of this attack on the soul and spirit is still being experienced today.

Due mainly to Maori leadership, and other leaders of like minds and heart, Te Tiriti was gradually reinstituted and factored into our constitutional frameworks, public psyche and policies. While we have advanced, with many of the injustices and losses for Maori addressed, we still have many roads to traverse together at all levels, if we are to fully recover as a nation and be a responsible member of our global community. Meanwhile, and relatively speaking, our journey through the pangs of transition over the last few decades offers many lessons to other nations and states on how to live, love and be just and fair to our fellow human beings – individually and institutionally.

Each year, Waitangi Day gives us a much-needed opportunity to pause and ponder the progress we have made on our collective effort towards our collective wellbeing; to learn from and to celebrate how we as individuals and collectives have risen to our natural, higher selves, and to acknowledge that through genuine collaboration and reconciliation we will continue to progress. Conflicts, discrimination and domination are things of the past, a recipe for ongoing disasters, a no-win situation for all, where an eye for an eye will make us all blind.

In light of our inter-connectedness and our common future as a nation, it is heartening to see the range of contributions from all sectors and communities to our collective future, as we learn from past follies.

Small but significant, the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand, Runanga Whakapiki Ake I Te Hauora O Aotearoa (HPF) is making such contributions through its work, including co-hosting the next World Conference on Health Promotion from April 7-11, 2019 in Rotorua. Te Tiriti informs the organising of the conference:
• Te Reo is one of the four official languages of the conference, a world-first;
• at least two Maori leaders will be keynote speakers; one of them will speak in Te Reo while it will be simultaneously translated into English, French and Spanish;
• Maori leadership is at the front of all aspects of the process and on all levels, under the principle of equal partnership;
• an Indigenous Statement, one of the major legacies of the conference, will articulate Indigenous perspectives on how to advance our wellbeing as fellow human beings, and how to be better and more effective stewards of our common home – Ranginui and Papatuanuku, also known as Mother Earth.

As Executive Director of HPF, I invite you to participate at the conference. World leaders and experts in public health, health promotion, planetary health and wellbeing and sustainable development will come and share their knowledge. Let us gift our knowledge in return. Let us continue to work together for the wellbeing of our nation, and our global society, for the world is but one country, and humankind its citizens.

Here’s the link for your information and registration. www.iuhpe2019.com See you in Rotorua!

Banner photo: Waitangi in the Bay of Islands.

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News, Uncategorized

The Health Promotion Forum of NZ has commended Waka Ama New Zealand for sticking to its fizzy drinks ban at its national championship festival this week.
First established in 2000, this year will be the 30th year for the festival, and its sixth year as a ‘fizz free’ event.
As many as 10,000 people from all corners of New Zealand and the Pacific Islands have converged on the shores of Lake Karāpiro for the event which runs from January 15 – 19.
HPF Deputy Executive Director and Maori strategist Trevor Simpson said, “seemingly small interventions can have far-reaching results. In a way what we are seeing is a reinstitution of the cultural norm of wai as the basis for life and wellbeing. We congratulate Waka Ama Aotearoa for their leadership and support for the fizz-free kaupapa.”
Janell Dymus-Kurei, General Manager of Hāpai Te Hauora which has a regional public health team at the event said the event was a great example of leadership in Māori health.
“The organisers have shown a strong commitment to oranga tinana through the promotion of physical activity which is embedded in te ao Māori. Through the adoption of a ‘fizz free’ stance, the festival also highlights the importance of the availability of water – wai Māori – to all whānau across the motu.”
The event also comes at a time when the role of sugary beverages in poor health outcomes are again being questioned.
The New Zealand Dental Association (NZDA) has called for sugary drink manufacturers to be forced to label their products with a teaspoon icon to clearly show how much sugar is in each beverage
“We support this call by the NZDA for better labelling of beverages,” says Selah Hart, and HPF board member.
“As a signatory to the NZDA-led consensus statement on sugary drinks, we appreciate the importance of good information for whānau when it comes to making choices about food and drinks.”

Photo provided by Hāpai Te Hauora

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Competencies, News

A one-day International Health Promoting Campuses Symposium will be held in Rotorua on April 7 from 10am to 4pm
To be held just before the global conference on health promotion the symposium aims to activate the Okanagan Charter on higher education campuses around the world.
The Okanagan Charter calls to embed health into all aspects of campus culture and lead health promotion action and collaboration locally and globally.
The charter was an outcome of the 2015 International Conference on Health Promoting Universities and Colleges held in the Okanagan in Canada.
The symposium will be relevant for academics, management, students, educators, student support staff, researchers, health promotion and public health specialists, and all those interested in the promotion of health, wellbeing and sustainability within Universities, Colleges, Polytechnics and Wānanga.
The symposium will provide a range of opportunities for participants to: work with international and national experts experienced in designing health promoting campuses; participate in the global health promoting universities and colleges movement; build collective engagement and commitment to implement the Okanagan Charter
Contact Dr Anna Thorpe, chair of the Tertiary Wellbeing Aotearoa New Zealand (TWANZ) network for information and registration of interest anna.thorpe@cdhb.health.nz
Meanwhile the first guide in the world to apply an international charter for health promoting universities and colleges to a local context is now available.
The guide has been in development for the past three years, with input from a wide range of people and organisations.
The Okanagan Charter is viewed as a useful and flexible framework easily adapted to campuses here.
Its principles and calls to action are already being applied in some campuses in Aotearoa New Zealand. Māori wellbeing frameworks, The Pea Hutong and Te Whare Tapa Whā, comfortably sit alongside the Okanagan Charter.
‘Applying the Okanagan Charter for health promoting campuses in Aotearoa New Zealand’ can be accessed on the TWANZ website.
Membership of the network is free, and a wide range of literature is available.

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Global, Maori

By Trevor Simpson

In April next year Aotearoa New Zealand will welcome the global health promotion workforce to Rotorua City for what is arguably the most important event on the health promotion calendar. The 23rd IUHPE (International Union for Health Promotion and Education) World Conference 2019 on health promotion will bring together experts, practitioners and interest groups who will converge to discuss health promotion across a range of political, economic and social contexts.
At the earliest stages the notion of the importance of indigenous health promotion and the opportunity to leverage indigenous aspirations for wellbeing were at the fore. Elevating this discussion to the highest level became a driver – not only for the inclusion of indigenous elements in the conference programme but rather to underpin and permeate every aspect of the meeting.
There is an unprecedented opportunity for indigenous health promotion leaders to use this platform to share our ideas, strengthen our resolve and promote wellbeing from a specific indigenous perspective.

Milestones for Indigeneity – a conference with a difference
From the initial discussions around the feasibility of bringing the conference to Aotearoa New Zealand through to the eventual bid in Curitiba, Brazil, the team at the Health Promotion Forum (HPF) were deliberate in ensuring the place of indigeneity. Indeed, the bid made to the IUHPE Global Executive Board in May 2016, included an indigenous Maori approach that ensured cultural imperatives were attended to from the outset; thoughtfully laying a platform upon which the entire event will be projected. In doing so this conference will provide the basis for unity in diversity for global health promotion, aligning western, eastern and indigenous perspectives across the theme of sustainable development and planetary wellbeing.

There is an unprecedented opportunity for indigenous health promotion leaders to use this platform to share our ideas, strengthen our resolve and promote wellbeing from a specific indigenous perspective.

The overarching theme of the conference for the first time includes the indigenous term “Waiora” loosely meaning “life-giving water”. Similar to “Vaiola” in Pacific vernacular the word relates to the sacred nature of water as a life-giving element. Appropriately, delegates will be situated in the south of the Pacific Ocean, the largest body of water on Earth, the historical home to many indigenous people, all of whom maintain a deep appreciation and affection for the ocean and the islands upon which they depend.

Te Reo Maori a world-first
For the first time Te Reo Maori as an indigenous language will be one of the four official languages of the conference. It will not only be used and encouraged throughout but also built into the official programme. Delegates will be able to experience this from the opening powhiri (Maori welcome ceremony), the inaugural speech in the Maori language by a plenary speaker, Tamati Kruger through to the poroporoaki (closing ceremony) where in each case the language will take precedence. Broadly, indigenous Maori themes, language, storytelling, arts and performance will provide a wonderful array of cultural features to enhance what is shaping up to be a wonderful scientific programme.
Significantly, along with Tamati Kruger four of the other 11 plenary speakers are from indigenous backgrounds. Stanley Vollant, Sir Mason Durie, Tony Capon and Colin Tukuitonga will bolster what is already a strong format for indigeneity at the plenary level. In terms of leadership this group provides a global perspective that will influence indigenous health promotion practice well into the future.
The programme also includes an Indigenous sub-plenary and opportunities to observe and participate in oral presentations, workshops and poster walks where indigenous health promoters and those working in indigenous communities can share their ideas.

Committed to the cause
Some wonderful work is also going on in the background. For the first time a team of guest editors will pull together an Indigenous Supplement to the IUHPE Global Health Promotion Journal to be released in time for the conference. The propensity for a supplement such as this to reach across the globe is not underestimated and the leadership of the IUHPE team working on the journal, the editors and guest editors to engage in such a project is a fine example of commitment to an important cause.
Additionally, a small team is working on drafting a Rotorua Indigenous Statement (yet untitled) to be considered for ratification in Rotorua. Not underestimating the magnitude of this project, the team is looking to include a wide range of perspectives, draw on expert knowledge and finally put out a call for support. At this stage the proposal is to release draft one version early in the New Year for members to consider, followed by a second draft in early March. The third and final draft will be presented at the conference itself and with the support of the delegates, formally endorsed.
In mentioning Rotorua, it should be noted that Te Arawa, the tribal hosts and supporters of the conference are renowned not only for their hospitality but also for their cultural strengths in history, language and arts. These are significant factors which have contributed to tribal, social and economic development not only in the city but across the lake’s region. It is impossible to escape indigeneity in this part of the world. It is an indelible asset that speaks to a world of possibilities, not only for Aotearoa New Zealand but for everyone and every place.

 

Trevor Simpson is HPF’s Deputy Executive Director / Senior Health Promotion Strategist (with Portfolio in Māori development).

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Equality, News

To provide a collective voice and expert support for effective policies and actions to reduce the harm from tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy foods, a new organisation has been established.

Health Coalition Aotearoa (HCA) also aims to reduce inequities through a focus on the determinants of health.

Launched in Wellington recently, Health Minister Dr David Clark commended the initiative, led by Professor Boyd Swinburn of the School of Population Health, University of Auckland.

Dr Clark highlighted the need for more and better collaboration among health professionals, academics, NGOs and the Government to tackle health inequities in New Zealand.

Professor Swinburn said at the launch that unhealthy diets, obesity, tobacco, and alcohol contribute about one third of the overall preventable health loss in New Zealand. Investment in population prevention of harm from tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy food is half a per cent of the national health budget and government prevention infrastructure was weak.

“Implementing the World Health Organization’s (WHO) ‘Best Buys’ for preventing chronic disease would save lives and money,’ Professor Swinburn said.

The Health Promotion Forum (HPF) is among more than 20 NGOs and institutions, and academic leaders that are foundation members of HCA.

“We need collective leadership and a united front to address the many challenges that we face today,” said HPF Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi.

Pictured at the launch of the coalition are from left: Professor Michael Baker, Otago University, Dr Lisa Te Morenga, Victoria Uni, Dr Ashley Bloomfield, Director-General, Ministry of Health, Professor Boyd Swinburn, University of Auckland, Hon Minister of Health Dr David Clark, Professor Sally Casswell, Massey University, Mike Kernaghan, CEO of Cancer Society.

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News

The development of an accreditation framework led by the Health Promotion Forum (HPF) to make health promotion a formal professional practice with a specialised body of knowledge is exciting news.

Although aligned with the global accreditation framework of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUIHPE), the local framework will be grounded on Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the Ottawa Charter, the two foundation documents for health promotion in the country.

It will include a public register for health promoters as a distinct professional group, according to HPF Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi.

“While the register will be voluntary, it can help communities and organisations identify health promoters whose competence would have been assessed under the accreditation framework.

“At present, workers from almost any field can move in and work in health promotion. We are progressing towards a system of best practice for the safety and wellbeing of communities, and sustaining the professional standards of the health promotion workforce. It is a win-win for all.

An equally important part of the framework is having health promotion qualifications, recognised by IUHPE, the global organisation that leads the on-going development of health promotion.

Sione points outs that the work is all based on the New Zealand Health Promotion Competencies that was approved by the health promotion sector and workforce in 2012. It is expected that the framework will be completed in two years.

 

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News

The University of Otago’s 2019 Public Health Summer School programme which will offer an outstanding range of courses, including 16 new ones, next year is open for registration.

If you are interested in a day of professional development or updating on topical issues in health, then the programme which runs from February 11 – March 1 at the university’s Wellington campus in Newtown is for you.

There are courses and symposia for everyone including 14 of the school’s most popular core topics.

Fran Wright who is on the PHSS Organising team says many people return for summer school courses every year, so they try hard to constantly refresh the programme and offer new courses on highly topical issues.

“We are so delighted with our 2019 programme, people have such great choice. This includes courses on everything from drug policy challenges to child wellbeing, to Pacific and Māori health, to being media savvy, to fostering good partnerships in promoting health.

“While most people take just a day or two out to attend a course of interest, we often have people joining us for five or six courses at a time and finding it a great way to start their year,” she says.

Ms Wright says Māori and Pacific Islanders who are working or studying in areas contributing to improving the health of Māori and Pacific people, but who may not be able to cover the cost of a course, are encouraged to apply for a scholarship to cover the cost of a one-day course.

“There are limited numbers available so please apply early as this is a great opportunity to not just build your knowledge, but to network with people from so many areas to share experiences.”

To register or to view more information the courses, which run from one to four days, see the Summer School website.

Many courses have limited numbers so don’t miss out and register now to receive a 25 per cent earlybird discount. Also, on offer are a limited number of Maori/Pacific Scholarships.

Pictured are contributors to the Indigenous People and Cancer Symposium run by the school in its 2018 programme. This was an amazing event attended by hundreds of people from all over New Zealand and the Pacific region.

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News, Pacific

The importance of health promotion for Pacific communities was emphasised at the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Christchurch on October 19.
The Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) workshop was held at the Christchurch Bridge club and was facilitated by HPF’s Dr Viliami Puloka.
It was attended by 11 participants who agreed they came away refreshed and eager to put into practice what they had learned.
Damaris Dekker from the University of Otago, Health and Safety said the workshop helped explain the concept of equity for Pacific health among other healthcare professionals.
“Great venue, well-structured day, great food and a good mixture of small group discussions and lecture format … It was a good refresher of knowledge and it was great to complete a workshop with a wide range of people, and to consider other perspectives.”
Epeli Bogitini, of Te Whare Ngakau Trust said as a health science student the workshop was really beneficial to him.
“It broadened my views about health promotion and how it is so vital for Pacific communities,” he said.
“Very thought-provoking,” was Carmen Collie’s response.
“I will now focus on reaching out to young Pasifika peoples with health promotion initiatives to stem the tide of NCDs (non-communicable diseases),” said Ms Collie who is from the Tangata Atumotu Trust.
Ms Collie added that she also gained some great connections within the local Pacific community after attending the workshop.
Lisa Suapopo, Tangata Atumotu Trust commended Dr Puloka for his “wonderful, passionate presentation”.
“It helped me be more aware of other’s cultural diversity.”
Dr Puloka who is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion said ways to help empower Pasifika peoples to achieve wellbeing and health and to move from knowledge to action were examined at the workshop.

He said the aim was to have participants come out of the workshop not only more knowledgeable about the magnitude and impact of NCDs but better equipped and more competent to convey the information and help their communities in a culturally appropriate way.
“Health promotion is all about empowering and enabling people to put all their knowledge and skills into action.”

Banner pic:
Dr Viliami, Puloka, second from left, with course participants at Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Christchurch on October 19.

 

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News

Limiting global warming to 1.5C would require urgent, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society according to a stark new report from the global scientific authority on climate change.
With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5C compared to 2C could go hand-in-hand with ensuring a more sustainable and equitable society, say the authors of the report the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
The report finds that limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require “rapid and far-reaching” transitions in land, energy, industry, buildings, transport, and cities. Global net human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) would need to fall by about 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030, reaching ‘net zero’ around 2050. This means that any remaining emissions would need to be balanced by removing CO2 from the air.
“The good news is that some of the kinds of actions that would be needed to limit global warming to 1.5C are already underway around the world, but they would need to accelerate,” said Valerie Masson-Delmotte, Co-Chair of Working Group I.
The IPCC’s models emphasise the need for people to change their lifestyle and consumption patterns to more sustainable alternatives, specifically in areas they can control, like modes of transportation, the buildings they inhabit and their dietary preferences.
The difference between a world that is 1.5C warmer and one that is 2C warmer would be significant, the report said. It could be the difference between a world that is recognisable and one that is not.
The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5C will be a key scientific input into the Katowice Climate Change Conference in Poland in December, when governments review the Paris Agreement to tackle climate change.
Read more on the report: www.ipcc.ch/news_and_events/pr_181008_P48_spm.shtml
Its release reinforces the timeliness of the International Union of Health
Promotion and Education’s (IUHPE) 23rd World Conference on
Health Promotion conference in Rotorua from April 7 to 11 next year.
Co-hosted by the Health Promotion Forum of NZ the conference has as its theme WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All.
As a theme, Waiora reflects the dependence of our own health on that of our planet, and recognises the major global challenge of balancing ongoing development with environmental stewardship.
Earlybird registrations close on November 28 so get in quick to secure your spot. Click here.

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News, Pacific

Looking at ways to help empower Pasifika peoples to achieve wellbeing and health – moving from knowledge to action – will be the main aim of the Pacific Health Promotion workshop in Christchurch on October 19.

Dr Viliami Puloka who will be conducting the workshop at the Christchurch Bridge Club says if you are working with Pacific people , this workshop is for you.

It is only the second time the workshop will be held in the garden city so get in quick to secure a spot and click here to complete the online registration form.

Dr Puloka who is the Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion says discussions at the workshop will centre around health issues that plague Pacific Islanders and Maori and how they impact the wellbeing of the Pacific community.

“They are at the top of the list for a range of health issues such as obesity, diabetes, heart and lung disease. There are many external determinants that contribute to this and we will be examining these at the workshop,” he says.

Basic knowledge and understanding of the four main risk factors that are common to all the main NCDs will be discussed from a determinant of health perspective.

Dr Puloka wants participants to come out of the workshop not only more knowledgeable about the magnitude and impact of NCDs but better equipped and more competent to convey the information and help their communities in a culturally appropriate way.

“In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.

“Health promotion is all about empowering and enabling people to put all their knowledge and skills into action.

“I think if we are to win them over we have to touch their hearts. Then we have a better chance of touching their minds – moving their hands and feet to action,” he adds.

A self-evaluation tool looking at how competent participants are in promoting health to Pacific communities as Pacific health promoters will also be included for discussion.

 

Dr Viliami Puloka, pictured speaking at the Pacific Wave Forum in August, is a public health physician with a special interest in diabetes and obesity. He brings with him a unique Pacific experience and has gained a broad social and cultural appreciation from working with the diverse and unique isolated islands of the Pacific.

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Maori, News

I tēnei tau ka tū tētehi o ngā mahi whakapakari o HPF ki Tāmaki Makaurau, arā , ko tō mātou Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion. Ia tau, ia tau ka tuku a HPF i ētahi karahipi kia taea te tangata ki te whakauru ēnei mahi akoranga. Ko ēnei karahipi e tuwhera ana ki ngā tāngata katoa o Aotearoa. Ko te utu mō ēnei karahipi he rīpoata.

Nā runga i te whakahauhau a HPF ka āhei ngā tauira ki te kōrero , ki te tuhi hoki i roto i te reo Māori. Ko te kōrero tuhi e whai ake nei nō tētahi o ngā tauira, i roto i tōna reo mai Te Tai Rāwhiti . Ko te kaupapa o tōna kōrero a tuhi ko ōna mahara me ōna whaiwhakaaro i runga tēnei wānanga. Kia ora Tomairangi, e mihi ake tatou ki a koe.

Kei aku nui, aku rahi, aku whakatamarahi ki te rangi,

E tuhi ana au i tēnei reta kia koutou ngā pītau whakarei kua whai whākaaro mōku me tōna ngākaunui ki ngā mahi i horahia ki mua ia mātou i roto i ngā marama kua hipa. I roto i ngā wānanga e rua i haere ai au ki Tamaki Makaurau te ako mai i te rangatira me te kaiārahi rongonui ā Trevor Simpson. Ko ngā akoranga i ākona e au i roto i āua wiki e rua ki tōna taha kua kīkī katoa tōku hinengaro i te mātauranga me ngā tikanga e āhei ana ki te ao hauora me ōna painga katoa.

I mua i tōku tīmata i tēnei wānanga kaore au i tino mōhio ki te ia o te Helth promotion, nā tōku hanatū ki ēnei wānanga me te rawe hoki o te āhua whakaako ā Matua Trevor i kaingākaunui au ki tēnei mahi me tōku hiahia te whai i tēnei huarahi o te Health promotion hei tikitki ano mo tōkū mahunga. Ko tā ngā kupu ā tōku pāpā ā Apirana Turupa Ngata ki āu i roto i tōna whakatauākī, “E tipu e rea, mo ngā rā o tōu ao”.

I roto i ngā akoranga nei kua huakina ōku whatu ki te ao e noho nei me ngā uauatanga e pēhī nei i tōku hapu me tōku iwi Māori. Ko ēnei akoranga kua tuhia ki tōku rae hei taonga tuku iho mo tōku whānau, meinga kore mo tēnei kaupapa ka aha mātou te iwi Māori ā te ao hurihuri. Ko tētahi o ōku wawata nui he whai i ngā tapuwae o tōku māmā, he nēhi ā rohe mo Ngati Porou. Nā tōku whai i tēnei huarahi kua whai kē tōku māmā i mua mai i āu kua harikoa tōku ngākau.

Nō reira me mihi ka tika au ki te rōpu nei ā te Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand me tō koutou tautoko i āu me tōku whānau ki te whakatutuki i tēnei tohu hei tikitiki ano mo tōku whānau, tōku hapu me tōku iwi Māori.  Ka hoki ōku mahara ki ngā wānanga me tēra whakataukī “ko te ātaahua o te noho tahi ā ngā teina me ngā tuakana i raro i te whakaaro kotahi” . Mēna kore mo te karihipi i whiwhia e au e kore au e taea te whakatūtūki i tētahi o ōku tino moemoeā, hei whakahoki atu ki tōku iwi nō reira he mihi manahau tēnei ki ngā kaiwāwāo me ngā kaiwhiriwhiri i whakahōnore i āu ki tēnei whiwhinga āu, e kore ngā mihi e taea e te kupu.

Nāku noa

Tomairangi Chaffey-Aupouri

 

 

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Maori, News, Uncategorized

All New Zealanders are being encouraged to take part in Māori Language Week which launched on September 10.

Nau mai ki Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori – Welcome to Māori Language Week

Ngā mihi mahana ki a koutou i runga i tēnei kaupapa whakahirahira kua tau ki runga i a tātou katoa

“The Māori language is one of the best ways to say ‘We are New Zealanders’. Everyone can help to celebrate and revitalise our country’s first language,” says Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta.

Te Wiki o te reo Māori runs from September 10 – 16 with the theme ‘kia kaha te reo Māori’ or ‘let the Māori language live’.

Mahuta says people can show their support for the language in many ways.

“Mums, dads and grandparents can show active interest and support for their kids as they learn Māori at school. If the school is not providing any Māori language, families can ask them to start.

“The business world and community groups can display bilingual signs to show te reo Māori is welcome in public and private spaces.

“And everyone can try a simple ‘kia ora’ (hello) or ‘mā te wā’ (bye) as they go about their daily business. Each time you use Māori correctly it is a valuable gesture to restore it as an everyday language. It all adds up”.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern who visited Wellington High School on Monday  to mark the start of the week told students one of her biggest regrets was not learning how to converse in te reo Māori.

In response to a student who asked how te reo and tikanga would be a part in her daughter Neve Te Aroha’s life she said: “Clark and I have only had very early discussions – we’re only 12 weeks in – but we’ve certainly got the books to be able to ensure that she’s learning te reo even through her early storytime,” Ms Ardern said.

Ms Ardern congratulated Wellington High School for making it compulsory for all Year nine students to learn te reo.

“Te Reo Māori me ona tikanga underpins Māori World views, values and beliefs. Custom, culture and language are inextricably linked,” says Trevor Simpson, Deputy Executive Director, HPF.

“Learning Te Reo Māori is a fantastic way to build an understanding of Māori views on health and wellbeing. By saying “kia ora” to another person what we are actually saying is that we wish for the other person to be enveloped in wellbeing and this is articulated at the very first interface between two people.”

Sione Tu’itahi, the Executive Director of the HPF says while HPF supports Māori language week our support will continue until next year when for the first time te reo Māori will be an official language at a global conference.

Celebration of te reo Maori will be a highlight at the 23rd IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All in Rotorua from April 7-11 next year.

“Our aim to sustain te reo Maori is always long-term. Given that we are co-hosting this world conference, it is only right that we honour te reo Maori this way …”

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Diet, Family and child

A major cause of New Zealand’s very high rates of obesity has been mapped in a world-first study from the University of Auckland providing a full picture of the healthiness of New Zealand food environments. The study was funded by the Health Research Council and the Heart Foundation of NZ.

The results were summarised in the executive summary  and the full report, which was launched by Professor John Potter, Chief Science Advisor to the Ministry of Health at a seminar on July 11. Professor Boyd Swinburn, University of Auckland, presented the results of the study.

Some of the findings included:

Government implementation of healthy food policies:

In 2014 and 2017, public health experts rated the extent of implementation of 23 policy and 24 infrastructure support good practice indicators compared to international best practice. Overall implementation scores were moderate at 43% in 2014 and 48% in 2017.

Some of the priority recommendations from the 2017 experts:

Food composition: Set targets for nutrients of concern (sodium, saturated fat, sugar)

Food labelling: Strengthen the Health Star Rating System and make it mandatory

Food marketing: Regulate unhealthy food marketing to children in media

Food prices: Implement a 20% tax on sugary drinks

Food company commitments to improving population nutrition:

The comprehensiveness and transparency of commitments of the 25 largest NZ food companies (supermarkets, food and beverage manufacturers, quick service restaurants) was assessed. There was a wide range of scores from 0% to 75% with the top five being Nestle, Fonterras, Coca-Cola, Mars and Unilever. The bottom five were Goodman Fielder, Hellers, Griffin’s Foods, Pita Pit and Domino’s.

Composition and labelling of packaged foods:

Analyses of over 13,000 NZ-packaged foods (2014-2016) showed that 83 per cent were classified as ultra-processed. 71 were classified as not suitable for marketing to children using WHO-Europe nutrient criteria, and 59 per cent had an HSR of <3.5 stars. The HSR labelling system was introduced in June 2014, but by March 2016, only five percent of products carried the HSR label. There has been slow uptake of the HSR by companies, yet nutrition claims promoting the “healthiness” of products are widespread even on less healthy products.

Unhealthy food marketing to children:

TV: Average of 8.0 unhealthy food ads per hour during child-peak viewing times. (6-9pm)

Magazines: 43% of branded food references in teen mags were for unhealthy foods

Around schools: A median of nine ads for unhealthy foods per km2

Food provision in settings:

Schools: Only 40% of schools had a written food policy and these policies had very low strength scores (avg 3%) and comprehensiveness scores (avg 16%). There is substantial scope to improve school food policies and practices for healthier school food policies.

Hospitals: All DHBs committed to remove sugar-sweetened beverages by January 2016 from their hospitals and premises and to develop healthy food service policies. DHBS are on a strong path to improve their food environments.

Food retail within communities and inside supermarkets

There were 14% more potential “food swamps” (high relative density of unhealthy food outlets) in the most deprived areas compared to the least deprived.

Only 27% of supermarkets had at least 20% of checkouts free of ‘junk’ food placements. The length of shelf space allocated to sets of unhealthy and healthy indicator foods showed an overall ratio of 0.42 (1m of unhealthy to 0.42m healthy indicator foods). In more deprived areas the shelf-length ratio was more weighted towards unhealthy foods.

Cost of healthier versus less healthy foods, meals and diets

The dollar price of takeaways for a family of four was higher than the equivalent home-cooked meal by an average of $8.20 and $8.50 respectively.

Overall healthy meals and diets can be constructed for a similar cost as takeaways and the current diet, but food in general is relatively unaffordable for those on low income.

Go to www.informas.org for the full report.

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News, Uncategorized

The plan by Government to phase out single-use plastic shopping bags over the next year has been greeted with a chorus of approval.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern who with associate environment minister Eugenie Sage made the announcement at Lyall Bay, Wellington recently said every year in New Zealand hundreds of millions of single-use plastic bags ended up polluting coastal and marine environments.

HPF’s deputy executive director Trevor Simpson commended the move but said in the interim period we needed to look at how to mitigate the level of damage to the environment through minimising the use and dispersal of single use plastic bags.

Mr Simpson said we are already moving towards the use of natural and sustainable bags. Our history also shows us that Aotearoa NZ was a strong producer and exporter of flax products, a native plant that has no detrimental effect on the environment. There is an opportunity to relook at flax and possibly other non-invasive plants as a solution. Products that have no detrimental effect on the environment was the way to go.

“In the meantime, I would recommend that supermarkets and other outlets offer their carry bags free to their customers. Some have already done this. We can make immediate change while we wait for the new policy.” he said.

Greenpeace celebrated the announcement as “a win for people power and the first big step towards addressing marine plastic pollution”.

“This could be a major leap forward in turning the tide on ocean plastic pollution and an important first step in protecting marine life such as sea turtles and whales, from the growing plastic waste epidemic,” said Emily Hunter, Oceans Campaigner at Greenpeace.

“In growing numbers over the last decade, New Zealanders have been calling for a ban on single-use plastic bags. This marks the beginning of the end for over two billion single-use plastic bags that clog our communities, coasts, rubbish dumps and oceans each year,” said Hunter.

The ban on single use plastic bags was a great first step – but we can’t rest on our laurels – we need to follow it up with a set of carefully thought out measures to get to grips with the other single-use plastics … Emily Hunter,  Greenpeace.

Local government and Retail NZ, the national retailers body praised Government’s decisive action on the issue.

“Local government have been pushing for action on single-use plastic bags since 2015, due to the significant impacts on the environment and that the costs of dealing with them are ultimately borne by ratepayers,” said LGNZ President Dave Cull.

First Retail Group managing director, Chris Wilkinson said having this confirmation was necessary as “it will now put all retailers on a level playing field, meaning every business will have to provide alternative solutions or encourage customers to bring their own packaging”.

The Packaging Forum, an industry group with a focus on recycling said a ban would set a level playing field for the retail industry and take an estimated 800 million bags out of circulation.

Soft Plastics Recycling Scheme manager Lyn Mayes said the primary goal of the forum was to reduce the amount of plastic packaging used.

Meanwhile Greenpeace has now launched an ambitious new blueprint to tackle New Zealand’s plastic crisis.

The action plan has been developed with a coalition of environmental groups under the banner Plastic Free NZ and has four points: extending the bag ban to “avoidables” such as plastic cutlery, straws and stirrers; starting a deposit system for plastic bottles so people can bring empties back for cash; imposing a levy on “problematic” items such as coffee cups, food packaging and cigarette butts and setting the country ambitious plastic reduction targets to monitor progress.

“The ban on single use plastic bags was a great first step – but we can’t rest on our laurels – we need to follow it up with a set of carefully thought out measures to get to grips with the other single-use plastics (SUPs),” said Hunter.

In New Zealand an estimated 77 per cent of the plastic waste washed up on our beaches are SUPs.

According to Greenpeace many other countries around the world including France, Vanuatu and Costa Rica are developing cohesive strategies on plastic. New Zealand doesn’t have one.

Major supermarket brands such as New World and Countdown are expected to get rid of SUPs by the end of this year.

The Warehouse Group is bypassing its transitionary step of introducing compostable bags at its checkouts and is moving directly to offering only reusable bags at its 254 stores.

The Warehouse and Warehouse Stationery CEO Pejman Okhovat says the change is an exciting one for the group.

“We’re really chuffed to once again be leading the charge against plastic and removing all single-use checkout bags next year.”

Mitre 10 and Z Energy have announced plans to phase out the bags.

Ms Sage wants the public to give feedback on the best ways for this ban to be phased in and has opened consultation until September 14.

Ms Sage said the mandatory phase-out would be developed under the Waste Minimisation Act.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DUMPED: Plastic bags, some filled with rubbish, mar the landscapes of some of Auckland’s most scenic walking routes.

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Maori

As Emma Frost walked out of Te Papa where she had just shared about her tupuna Meri Te Tai Mangakahia she felt cleansed and reinvigorated.

“Moving out of Te marae I gratefully ran my fingers along the kohatu with the cleansing waters running over it,” says Emma who is HPF’s Activities Coordinator and Office Manager.

“For our talks had so moved us all there felt the need to wash away the tears, revitalise ourselves and move forward to new challenges.”

Emma was a panellist at a gathering of Māori historians, curators, archivists, and mokopuna who got together at Te Papa in Wellington on Sunday (August 12) to share an afternoon of kōrero and waiata in celebration of the diverse history of mana wahine.

In May 1893, Meri Te Tai Mangakahia (Te Rarawa, Ngāti Te Reinga, Ngāti Manawa, and Te Kaitutae) was the first woman to speak in any New Zealand parliament, presenting the motion that women should be able to vote and to be ‘accepted as members of the parliament’.

 Her reasons included whanau who had no male issue or tane to look after their land. Or, their men were koretake in managing their whanau affairs.

“It never occurred to me that wahine Māori were involved in this world history action that not only helped shape our nation but that of nations around the world,” Emma told her audience.

“I was immediately impacted by this new knowledge because …. what I am familiar with in terms of great icons of women leadership in the history of Aotearoa are Jean Batten and Kate Shepherd.

“But this wahine: whose photo sits on the walls of our marae,  who was the daughter of our great Chief Re Te Tai and the grand-aunt of my mother, Irene Frost became someone I could personally relate to, not just because of our toto but because we are both antagonists of women’s reform, kaitiaki of our burgeoning young women, keepers of the values important to us – whanau, hapu, iwi relationships, te Ao Maori and a future that inspires justice and peace… that is why I am moved to try and preserve and tell her story.Emma explained how Meri was also behind Ngā Komiti Wāhine, national forums for Māori women to debate land, cultural, and political issues.

“I currently sit on the Women’s Centre Waitakere, I’m tuned into campaigns advocating the rights for women – gender equality and increasing the presence of women on governance boards. As a member of the MWWL Wahine Māori Toko I te ora I am proud to continue her legacy of supporting and presenting on women’s issues.”

Emma said the memorable event was well received and there was a lively Q & A afterwards.

“Questions centred around what Mana Wahine meant to us? What do we think about funding for Captain Cook commemorations and how have the women who moved us inspired us professionally or in other ways? Some were moved to ears and we’re still asking ourselves ‘what happened’

Kiwi musician Ria Hall’s video of her open letter to the Prime Minister earlier in the day generated much discussion while her strong vocal range during her live performance at Te Papa was also one of the highlights of the afternoon.

Aroha Harris who was also a panellist summed up the event: “If you weren’t there, you missed out. Something powerful happened.  I loved it – loved being a part of it; loved hearing you all and getting to know the women you chose.”

Others who payed tribute to the diverse history of mana wahine

Matariki Williams (Tuhoe, Te Atiawa, Ngati Whakaue, Ngati Hauiti) talked about the lady in the portrait by Wilhelm Dittmer titled Maori girl, whose identity is unknown.

Helen Brown (Ngai Tahu) focused on one of the “ordinary, yet extraordinary” women who populate our histories — Mere Harper (1842-1924) who was of mixed descent (Tahu mother and Pequot father). Over six feet tall she was famous for her work as a porter.

Aroha Harris (Te Rarawa, Ngapuhi) not only want to talk about Akenehi Hei  as the first registered Māori nurse, and a pioneer in that sense, but also as a woman working steadfastly (and in historiographical terms, invisibly) at the frontline of Māori health.

Melissa Matutina Williams (Te Rarawa, Ngati Maru) centred her talk on Mira Szaszy as a complex woman who was both  of and before her time in terms of gender politics and defining what a ‘modern Māori woman’ could look like, do and achieve in the mid-to-late 20th century.

Leonie Hayden(Ngati Whatua o Kaipara, Ngati Rango) chaired the talk capably and with foresight and understanding of the issues our ‘inspired women’ were facing.

 

 

 

REMEMBERING: Our very own Emma Frost pays tribute to her tupuna Meri Te Tai Mangakahia at an afternoon of kōrero and waiata in celebration of the diverse history of mana wahine Te Papa, Wellington.

 

 

 

SHARING: HPF’s Emma Frost, third from left, joins other panellists in celebration of the diverse history of mana wahine at Te Papa, Wellington.

 

Banner pic: A commemoration plaque to Meri Te Tai Mangakahia at her marae in Waihou.

Photo by Juliet Lagan

 

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News, Pacific

As keynote speaker at the Pacific Wave Forum in Auckland from August 6 to 7 Dr Viliami Puloka showed findings that surpassed common perceptions of the diabetes epidemic across the Pacific region.

The one that stunned many attendees was a table titled Prevalence Rates of Diabetes: Top 10 Countries of the World. Compiled by the IDF (International Diabetes Federation, 2015), the table revealed that six of the top 10 countries with high rates of diabetes are in the Pacific. Tokelau, an island country and dependent territory of New Zealand, tops the table with 30% of its population aged from 20-79 affected.

Following that in order are: Nauru at 24.1%; Cook Islands 21.5%; Marshall Islands 21.3%; Palau 20.9% and New Caledonia 19.6%. The IDF report concluded that “The percent of people affected by NCDs will rise substantially in the Pacific in the coming decades”.

Among the Pacific nations not included is Papua New Guinea, despite a substantially bigger population which is growing faster than its Pacific neighbours with increasing NCD rates.

A key finding also reveals the NCD mortality burden is much greater in Pacific countries compared to global standings.

For Dr Puloka, the Senior Health Promotion Strategist for the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand and a Research Fellow (University of Otago) it is not just a health issue.

“It is the only issue … because our health and wellbeing enables us to be able to contribute in a meaningful way,” he says.

“Our health is a resource that we do life with. But the statistics clearly show we in the Pacific are not doing it well.”

He admits it’s more challenging across the region because the island nations’ smaller economies do not have the health resources its bigger neighbours such as Australia and New Zealand operate on.

Therefore, Dr Puloka stresses education and lifestyle changes to diet and exercise are essential to reversing the rising and alarming projections.

A 2012 WHO (World Health Organisation) report noted that “tobacco is the leading behavioural risk factor causing substantially large numbers of potentially preventable deaths worldwide, leading to one death every six seconds”.

Pacific island nations Kiribati and Papua New Guinea were shown as having the third and fifth highest smoking rates in the world with prevalence rates of 67% and 55% respectively.

Our health is a resource that we do life with. But the statistics clearly show we in the Pacific are not doing it well.

The share of public expenditure on health is also rising, said Dr Puloka, with nine of the 11 Pacific countries featured in a WDI (World Development Indicator) report increasing their share of public spending on health as a percentage of GDP (Growth Domestic Product) between 2000 and 2013, despite being increasingly vulnerable to global economic shocks.

Working closer with the private sector is one of the few ways Dr Puloka can see light flickering at the end of the tunnel.

“Preventing the rise of NCDs through education is the key for long-term sustainability,” he says.

“Working alongside the private sector to find solutions has the potential to provide a workable solution.”

Craig Strong, PCF CEO says the Pacific Wave Forum was a success and it wouldn’t have been possible without the PCF team who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to ensure the programme ran seamlessly.

“I’d also like to acknowledge PIFS and PIPSO, who we partnered with, and to all the representatives from the Pacific Private Sector organisations.

“Our conference was centred on the Pacific concept of ‘Talanoa’. We heard the stories, ideas and challenges that our region continues to battle – NCDs and Climate Change.

“The collective discussions in the duration of the conference resulted in collective actions. These are now drafted in a statement that will be presented at the Private Sector Dialogue with Forum Leaders next month in Nauru, keeping in mind the pertinent theme: Building a Strong Blue Pacific – Our People, Our Islands, Our Will.”

(PACIFIC Cooperation Foundation weekly news and updates)

 

 

HPF’s Dr Viliami Puloka speaking on non-communicable diseases at the Pacific Wave conference in Auckland.

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News

Today is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples and the spotlight is being shone on forced migration.

This year’s theme focuses on the current situation of indigenous territories, the root causes of migration, trans-border movement and displacement, with a specific focus on indigenous peoples living in urban areas and across international borders.

The observance will explore the challenges and ways forward to revitalise indigenous peoples’ identities and encourage the protection of their rights in or outside their traditional territories.

In his message to mark the day UN Secretary-General António  Guterres focused on the factors pushing indigenous people to migrate “within their countries and across international borders” despite their “profound spiritual connection to their lands and resources”.

Mr Guterres noted that “some are subject to displacement or relocation without their free, prior and informed consent”, adding that “others are escaping violence and conflict or the ravages of climate change and environmental degradation” and that many migrate in search of better prospects and employment for themselves and their families.

He stated that while migration is an opportunity, “it also carries inherent risks” citing the unsafe and unsanitary conditions many end up living in, especially in urban areas.

Referring to the Global Compact for migration, which UN Member States have committed to adopt later this year, Mr Guterres said “this will establish an international framework for regional and global cooperation” and “provide a platform to maximize the benefits of migration and support vulnerable migrant groups, including indigenous peoples”.

He called for the full realisation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, “including the rights to self-determination and to traditional lands, territories and resources”.

Click here to read full story.

HPF’s executive director Sione Tu’itahi reflected on the significance of the day especially in light of one of the underlying themes of the 23rd IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion in Rotorua from April 7-11 which was Indigenous knowledge on health promotion.

The conference will provide a valuable platform for the sharing of this knowledge, he said.

“Indigenous knowledge enunciates that humanity and its environment are one…Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development can offer solutions to our global challenges today,” said Mr Tu’itahi.

In a joint statement marking the day a group of UN experts say it is crucial that the rights of indigenous peoples are realised when they migrate or are displaced from their lands.

States around the world must take effective action to guarantee the human rights of indigenous people,” say the experts.

“In many parts of the world, indigenous peoples have become migrants because they are fleeing economic deprivation, forced displacement, environmental disasters including climate change impacts, social and political unrest, and militarisation. Indigenous peoples have shown remarkable resilience and determination in these extreme situations.”

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in the world, living across 90 countries. They make up less than five per cent of the world’s population, but account for 15 per cent of the poorest. They speak an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7000 languages and represent 5000 different cultures. Read more.

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News

The deadline is looming for abstracts to be submitted for next year’s health promotion conference in Rotorua, New Zealand.

 

Preparations for the conference from April 7-11 are gaining momentum and with the deadline date of August 31 just around the corner, time is ticking to get your abstract in for the chance to exchange knowledge and build networks with up to 2000 delegates from around the world.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is co-hosting the conference which has the theme Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development.

The approximate date of acceptance of abstracts is October 22 and all abstracts must be submitted through this online form.  Submissions can be made in English, Spanish, French and Te Reo Māori.

HPF’s Executive Director Sione Tu’itahi says the conference will be an invaluable forum for those in the sector to share strategies, policies and practices.

“I encourage you, if you haven’t already, to get your abstracts in before the due date. The opportunity to share expertise and knowledge with like-minded people from around the world and New Zealand is too good to pass up.

“Your story is unique. But your fellow health promoters won’t know until you show and tell. Share and learn from world experience.”

All abstract submitters, including individual contributors, are encouraged to interact  and collaborate with other presenters and participants wherever possible. Participatory, collaborative and non-traditional session formats will be given priority in the selection process.

Eight major formats are offered for submission: symposium; workshop; research oral/poster presentation; innovation in policy and practice oral/poster presentation; round table discussion; alternative showing/new technology; alternative showing/art, and lunch with an author.

The committee is encouraging submissions to match the sub-themes of the conference. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the four conference sub-themes:

Health equity 
Ensure health equity throughout the life course, within and among countries, making each member of the global society an empowered lifelong learner.

Inclusive habitats 
Make all urban and other habitats inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and conducive to health and wellbeing.

Climate change adaptation strategies 
Design and implement effective and fair climate change adaptation strategies.

Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance 
Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance at all levels that promotes, peace, justice and respect of human rights.

For further information on each of these formats please click here.

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News

A major cause of New Zealand’s high rates of obesity has been mapped in a world-first study from the University of Auckland.

The study provides a full picture of the healthiness of New Zealand food environments.

The study which was conducted by INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/NCFs Research, Monitoring and Action Support) found that food environments, especially children’s environments, were largely unhealthy, and policy implementation was low.

Food industry commitments are relatively weak, more than half of the packaged food supply is unhealthy and children and young people are exposed to considerable marketing of unhealthy foods through all media channels were some of the findings.

Significantly, those living in poorer areas were found to be exposed to about three times as many takeaways, fast food outlets and convenience stores; more ads for unhealthy foods around schools and more shelf space devoted to unhealthy foods in supermarkets than wealthier neighbourhoods.

HPF’s Pacific strategist Dr Viliami Puloka commended the study for approaching the issue at a policy level.

Dr Puloka said this approach was necessary because the focus was to highlight that it was the ‘environment’ that matters and that it has a strong influence on personal/individual choices and lifestyle behaviours.

“If you are waking up in an area with half-a-dozen fast food outlets next door to you it is hard to keep away … you have to be almost superhuman to resist.

“The manufacturers and businesses major food companies have done their homework. They know where the vulnerable people are.”

Dr Puloka said it was interesting to see the results from the study’s measurements of the length of shelf space dedicated to different products in supermarkets.

According to the research the length of shelf space allocated to sets of unhealthy and healthy indicator foods showed an overall ratio of 0.42 (1m of unhealthy to 0.42m healthy indicator foods). In more deprived areas the shelf length ratio was more weighed towards unhealthy foods (0.38) than in less deprived areas (o.44).

Dr Puloka emphasised the need for consumers to band together and push for healthier options in supermarkets and other outlets.

“We in health promotion will continue to share our knowledge and understanding … we need to create a hunger for healthy food so there is a demand. If we stand together and believe we have the power to influence these major players in the food industry

“It is already happening.  Fast food outlets now sell salads and wraps. Healthier options in a number of places are now available,” added Dr Puloka.

On a bright note the study found that DHBs were taking a leadership role when it came to health food choices and that the nutrition policies of DHBs were much stronger and more comprehensive. An analysis of DHB policies in 2017 found an average strength score of 58 per cent and comprehensive scores of 70 per cent.

This was in contrast to schools, which the survey revealed had substantial scope to improve school food policies and practices. Only 40 per cent of schools had a written food policy and these policies had very low strength scores (average 3 per cent) and comprehensiveness scores (average 16 per cent).

“People choose their diets from the food environments around them and when these are dominated by unhealthy foods and drinks, it is no surprise that our overall diets are unhealthy and our obesity rates are so high,” said Professor Boyd Swinburn who led the three-year study funded by the Health Research Council and the Heart Foundation.

“Of the many sub-studies in this project, several areas emerged where action could really make a difference,” said Professor Swinburn.

“The food in schools was surprisingly unhealthy given all the publicity about rising childhood obesity and food marketing to children was heavily dominated by unhealthy foods across all forms of media and used techniques to engage children such as premium offers and cartoon characters. Food labelling was also a problem with slow uptake of the Health Star Rating system and many unhealthy foods carrying positive nutrition claims.”

Professor Kathryn McPherson of the Health Research Council agreed that ‘choice’ was a complex topic and, for many people, making good food choices was hampered by strong environmental cues such as which food is most readily available.

“We welcome the important findings of this research which should inform decisions by schools, policy makers, and indeed food manufacturers.”

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News

Hāpai Te Hauora in collaboration with Australian Progress is recruiting participants for this year’s Fellowship.

Designed specifically for mid-senior leaders in social change, the Aotearoa Fellowship will super-charge your skills and energy, help you gain further confidence as a social change leader, and connect you with a community of your peers from across Aotearoa.

The Aotearoa fellowship is book-ended by two intensive four-day retreats, with five interactive expert webinars in-between. You will explore the latest thinking in: Campaign strategy; Messaging & framing; Digital engagement; Community organising; Advocacy & decision-maker and engagement.

The fellowship has been run in collaboration between Hāpai Te Hauora Maori Public Health and the Centre for Australian Progress for the past three years.

At the completion of the fellowship, all participants join a “remarkable Trans-Tasman network of change-makers”.

There are a number of registration spaces available, apply here, where you will find all the details about the fellowship, and the cost for attendance.

Over two cohorts in 2016 and 2017, 40 fellows have completed the fellowship in New Zealand, from organisations such as Hāpai Te Hauora, Amnesty International, Mapu Maia (Pacific Arm of the Problem Gambling Foundation), 350 Aotearoa, the Public Service Association, the Blind Foundation, ActionStation, Safe, JustSpeak and the National Council of Women.

In 2017, NZ fellows were joined by five fellows from Australia, and the programme remains open to Australians based outside Sydney and Melbourne.

Photo: Members of the 2017 Fellowship cohort.

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Competencies

After the overwhelmingly positive feedback from participants who attended the most recent courses run by HPF, news that the next two courses have been confirmed is welcome.

The Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion will be held in Wellington and Auckland. Block One of the Wellington course will be held from September 4- 7 and Block Two from October 2-5 at Te Aroha Clubrooms (opposite Waiwhetu Marae), 148 Whites Line East, Waiwhetu, Lowerhutt.

In Auckland, Block One will be held from October 30 to November 2 and Block Two from November 27 to 30 at the Manukau Institute of Technology in Otara. Click here to complete the online registration.

HPF’s Trevor Simpson who will facilitate the course also facilitated the Māori Concepts of Health workshop in Blenheim on May 7.

Participants praised Mr Simpson for his excellent knowledge and resources and described him as an “amazing presenter, easily relatable, humorous and clear”.

The participants came away from the workshop “energised, confident, motivated” and ready to tackle their jobs with a new-found enthusiasm.

They agreed they learned so much about the identity of Māori and why this needs to be respected when working in health promotion.

Sally Tonill a social worker from Nelson Bays Primary Health said this was one of the most interesting trainings she had done around Māori worldview.

“It has reignited my interest in how I work and engage with Māori in community, as I was getting a bit jaded.”

Pam Maxted of the Marlborough District Health Board said the presentation was well balanced and made her really mindful of how much she needed to listen to Maori in the relationship-building process.

Understanding Māori myth, legends and customs was also a highlight for participants.

A limited number of scholarships for the health promotion courses are available. Contact emma@hauora.co.nz for an application.

(In the banner photo are students at the Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion course at MIT in Manukau with course facilitator, Trevor Simpson, left, from April 17 to 20 and May 15 to 18.)

 

 

Students wrapped up the course with team presentations, showcasing not only what they had learned and understood but how creatively they could get their message across to their audience.

 

 

 

The team presentations entertained and informed the audience, which comprised fellow students.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Facilitator, Trevor Simpson is the Deputy Executive Director and Senior Health Promotion Strategist with the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand. Trevor has a background in community development, Māori social development, Treaty settlements and Māori health promotion. He is committed to Māori health promotion as an important vehicle to improving Māori health outcomes and Māori community development.

 

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Global, Uncategorized

More speakers have been confirmed for the world conference on health promotion in Rotorua next year adding to the diverse line-up.

They include respected indigenous leaders from around the world and New Zealand who will be sharing their knowledge and expertise at the 23rd International Union of Health Promotion and Education World Conference from April 7 to 11.

Registrations  for the conference which is co-hosted by the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand are now open and the call for abstracts has gone out.

We take a look at: Dr Stanley Vollant, the first indigenous surgeon in Quebec, Canada; Sir Mason Durie, one of New Zealand’s most respected academics, knighted in 2010 for services to public and Māori health and Tamati Kruger, Māori advocate and social and political analyst.

Dr Vollant who grew up in the Côte-Nord region of Quebec was exposed at a young age to the traditional teachings of his grandfather, which were marked by the importance of community values.

He received his degree in medicine from the Université de Montréal in 1989 and his specialisation in general surgery in 1994.

During the first annual “Stanley Vollant Challenge,” a six-kilometre walk to promote health and wellness he told CBC News that he wanted to inspire Indigenous youth across Quebec to follow their dreams, while also leading healthy lifestyles.

He said it was important to bring Indigenous and non-Indigenous walkers together in the spirit of reconciliation.

“My vision is to bring people to celebrate wellness and also to celebrate [being] all together, Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.”

Sir Mason who was born in 1938, of Rangitane, Ngāti Kauwhata and Ngāti Raukawa descent, grew up in Feilding, where his hard-working parents showed him the importance of a strong work ethic.

Between 1986-1988 he served on the New Zealand Royal Commission on Social Policy and in 1988 accepted a position at Massey University as Professor and Head of Te Pūtahi a Toi, School of Māori Studies.  Up until retirement in June 2012 he was Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Māori Research and Development.

He has been at the forefront of a transformational approach to Māori health and has played major roles in building the Māori health workforce for more than 40 years.

He has also championed higher education for Māori and has published widely on Māori health, Māori policy, the Treaty of Waitangi, Māori education and whānau development.

In his book Nga Tini Whetu NAVIGATING MAORI FUTURES he says in the introduction that, “If there is a single message to this book, it is that Maori have the knowledge, skills and foresight to create a future where younger generations yet to come can prosper in the world, and at the same time live as Maori”.

The model he created for healthcare, Te Whare Tapa Wha, successfully challenged the notion that health is the same for people of all cultures.

He has also made significant strides with his work in mental health, and most recently, the prevention of suicide in Maori and Pasifika communities.

During 2009 he chaired the Ministerial Taskforce on Whānau Centred Initiatives and from 2011 was chair of the Whānau Ora Governance Group.  In 2018 he was also a panel member for the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addictions.

Upon being awarded the Blake Medal at last year’s Sir Peter Blake Leadership Awards Sir Mason told the NZ Herald: “The most important thing has been the difference to health. That’s where my career started and it’s continued to be what I spent most of my time doing.

“It’s really how to make people more aware that health is not just a question for doctors and nurses, but a question people have themselves.”

Mr Kruger is a Māori advocate and social and political analyst who has dedicated his career to the development of his iwi. From the Ngāti Koura, Ngāti Rongo and Te Urewera hapū of Tūhoe, Mr Kruger was instrumental in securing the largest Treaty of Waitangi settlement to date ($450 million) for the Central North Island Iwi Collective.

He is now a director of CNI Holdings, representing Tūhoe.

More recently, Mr Kruger was chief negotiator of the Tūhoe-Te Urewera Treaty of Waitangi Settlement. The landmark settlement included a Crown apology for historical grievances, a social service management plan for the Tūhoe rohe and a financial and commercial redress package totalling $170 million.

The settlement also included legislative changes to transfer Te Urewera National Park to its own separate legal entity, looked after by the Te Urewera Board, of which Mr Kruger is chair.

Mr Kruger’s contribution is not limited to his tribe. He chaired the Second Ministerial Māori Taskforce on Whānau Violence and developed the Mauri Ora Framework and was awarded the Kahukura award in 2013 in recognition of this work.

In an interview with Asia Pacific Report he said an important part of leadership involved navigating the difference between Māori and Pākehā politics.

“Part of the blessing of Pākehā politics is you have this apparatus called law, where you can bend people to one’s will. But in Tūhoe politics you have to depend on your reputation and integrity for people to find that whatever you have to say has some wisdom and truth in it.”

The official languages of the conference are English, Spanish, French and in a world-first for Māori and other indigenous cultures Te Reo Māori.

Abstracts must be in by August 31 and submissions can be made in the official languages.

 

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Global

For the first time, the World Conference on Health Promotion will be held in New Zealand from April 7-11, 2019. Rotorua is the venue. The conference provides rare opportunities for New Zealand health promoters, other health professionals, policy makers and others whose work impacts directly on our health and wellbeing, to share knowledge with colleagues from around the world, and to co-construct health promoting pathways into the future.

 

Hauora catches up with HPF’s Executive Director, Sione Tu’itahi, on the significance of the conference for New Zealand and the world.

 

What made you decide to invite the conference to NZ?

There were three major reasons.  First, New Zealand is part of the global community. And we have common, global challenges that determine our health and wellbeing, such as the environment, economy, education, governance and leadership, which directly impact at the national and local levels.

To address these challenges, we must engage on all levels, especially at the global level. No man is an island anymore. The world is but one country.

Second, and as part of the significant damage caused mostly by us humans to our natural and built environment, climate change is the most urgent issue to be addressed today. Our Pacific region, is where climate change is most evident – eroding and sinking islands, sea level-rise because of global warming, tsunamis, cyclones, and people having to migrate from their homelands because of these disasters.  Clearly, the environment is one of the major determinants of our health and wellbeing. So our region must engage in finding solutions to these issues through health promotion and other professional fields. And it is timely and propitious to have that conversation in our region so that health promoters, other health workers, policy makers and other professionals whose work impacts on our health and wellbeing, come together to share experience and explore solutions. That is why we have the conference over-arching theme as “Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All,” and the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as the framework.

Third, New Zealand is a world leader in Indigenous knowledge and health promotion. Indigenous knowledge systems are now being acknowledged as contributors of solutions to world problems.  We can share our experience with the rest of the world, and we can learn from their experience too. For example, Indigenous cultures see humanity as part of and inseparable from the environment. Therefore, we humans must live in harmony with nature, and within its limits.  The dominant cultural paradigms of the last two centuries regard humans as not only separate from but also owners of the environment, which is seen as a limitless resource to exploit for their insatiable wants. Today we all experience the folly of such perspectives and practices. I think we are beginning to learn some lessons from that erroneous worldview and its underlying values and principles.

Overall, we decided to host because we think that New Zealand health promotion can contribute to addressing inequities and the wellbeing of the world. But also, we have a lot to learn from colleagues around the world, and to strengthen our relationship with IUHPE which leads the ongoing advancement of health promotion, including the development of the global accreditation framework for health promoters. HPF is party to the development of that global accreditation framework which will enhance the efficacy of the health promotion profession for the competency of health promoters and the wellbeing of peoples and communities they serve around the world. Among other benefits, it will also give international recognition to national health promotion qualifications, with positive implications for work in other countries.

 

What other benefits can New Zealand gain from the conference?

There are a few major benefits, not just for New Zealand but for the rest of the world. Evidence-based knowledge that works will be shared and everyone will learn at the conference.  Also, national, regional, and international networks and collaborative efforts will be further enhanced and strengthened among professionals across health and other sectors. We have no choice but to work together, or we suffer and perish together, whether we like it or not.

A third benefit is that two statements from the conference will provide future pathways for policy makers, health professionals and communities on how to address our common, global challenges that impact on our common home, planet earth. One of these two future-focus statements will be on Indigenous health promotion.

A fourth benefit is that Te Reo Maori is elevated to one of the four official languages of the conference. This is a world-first for IUHPE and for New Zealand. It might be a small step, but to have an indigenous language as one of the official languages of a world conference is a giant step for indigenous human rights. It is also a most empowering message to indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities in terms of championing their rights, their wellbeing, and preserving their knowledge systems through preserving their languages. Actually, having Te Reo as an official language is part of our using of Te Tiriti o Waitangi as the framework for organising the conference. It is another way of sharing our New Zealand experience with the rest of the world.

A fifth benefit for New Zealand is the aspirational goals for Rotorua to be a ‘healthy city’ under the World Health Organization (WHO) system.  And, of course the 2000 participants will bring economic gains for the country, and not just the tourism sector. It is our experience that participants travel to gain knowledge and enhance their professional networks, but they also take their families and loved ones to visit the host country. It’s a great way of promoting our beautiful country to the world. So you see, the conference will bring many benefits to all parties. It is a win-win initiative.

 

But what challenges do you and your team face in organising this world event in NZ?

There are the usual logistical challenges that come with organising events, such as finance, appropriate venues, communication, transport, accommodation and food. All this while trying to create a high-quality scientific and social programmes that will attract the top of your profession as keynote speakers, as well as other participants who will bring their latest research findings and professional experience to share and to learn from one another.

What makes it more challenging is that you have to build an international organisational structure at three levels – global, national and local – to plan and manage across different time zones with colleagues around the world. Put on top of that the fact that you have to have keynote speakers from the four official languages of the conference – English, French, Spanish, and Te Reo Maori, and consider gender balance, linguistic & ethnic diversity, and age. But thanks to technology, our 100 HPF member organisations, our professional conference company (The Conference Company), and the help of Tourism New Zealand, as well as our co-organiser, IUHPE, we are managing well, with the usual hiccups, of course.  Challenges are good and timely incentives to help ensure you do your utmost best and become more innovative and prudent at the same time.

(Sione pictured catching up with Pacific delegates from Tuvalu and Kiribati at the WHO congress on health promotion, Shanghai, 2016)

 

From an educational perspective, this is excellent professional development training for our team and others in the country and overseas who have volunteered to help organise the conference.  It gives you a real sense of how we live and work as a global village – i.e. we work together across national, geographic and cultural borders to address challenges that confront us all as one human family. As for the conference programme, we have a line-up of public health and health promotion leaders, such as Sir Michael Marmot, Professors Fran Baum, Anthony Capon, and Sir Mason Durie, as keynote speakers. And we are shaping up a highly educational and informative scientific programme that our expected 2000 participants will enjoy and learn a lot from.

You will find more details on the conference website http://www.iuhpe2019.com/

We would love to see all our health promotion and public health colleagues around the world, especially those here in the country, join us. Because public health and health promotion is so relevant to other sectors, such as education, local government, social work, community development, and sustainable development, we would like to think that this is also a conference for colleagues working in those sectors. Health and wellbeing in its broadest meaning and dimensions, such as physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, economic wellbeing, social wellbeing, cultural wellbeing, and environmental wellbeing, are at the core of the work of most sectors.

 

You started planning the conference in 2016, but you have been involved with IUHPE for more than 10 years now. For example, you have been a member of the IUHPE Global Executive Board, and Vice President of IUHPE for the South West-Pacific region for some six years. What prompted you to be involved with IUHPE?

The main reason is we are now a global village. Our global challenges are not only inter-connected but they impact on all levels – from the local to the global, and vice-versa. IUHPE provides that global platform and network for health promotion and HPF, hence my involvement. Our focus is still New Zealand, but we include other levels in our work here at HPF. Take smoking and climate change as two health challenges. They impact on all levels. New Zealand’s involvement at the global level helps to find more lasting solutions at its national level for both issues.

The other reason is that good governance and effective leadership is needed if we are to be effective in whatever field we work. HPF saw the opportunity to lead and we took it up on behalf of the South-West Pacific region, which covers NZ, Australia, all other Pacific island nations, and some countries in South East Asia.

My first IUHPE world conference on health promotion was in 2007 in Vancouver, Canada. I attended along with former HPF Executive Director, Dr Alison Blaiklock, and another former HPF co-worker, Joanne Aoake. I saw then the opportunity to build the relationship with IUHPE, and bring my experience and learning to our team and the health promotion workforce. Hosting the conference is the latest development of that professionalrelationship with IUHPE. But there are other developments such as having our Deputy Executive Director, Trevor Simpson, as the Chair of the International Network for Indigenous Health Promotion Professionals (INIHPP) of IUHPE. HPF is also leading the work for New Zealand health promotion to become part of the global accreditation framework for health promotion, recently established by IUHPE. IUHPE has a standing work relationship with WHO, which is a partner of the conference, along with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), being led by Dr Colin Tukuitonga, and the Australian Health Promotion Association.

(Taking time out for a photo with Professor Ilona Kickbusch, one of the architects of the Ottawa Charter, 1986.)

 

You have years of working as a journalist in Tonga and the Pacific, then retrained as a teacher and taught at some of the tertiary educational institutions here in New Zealand. Why did you later choose to work in health? And what has the experience been like for you?

Health and education are two important and related determinants of the wellbeing and prosperity of Pacific peoples, in fact, all people. Good education means not only you are enlightened, but you also have a decent income which enables you to afford a healthy life, and be in control of your future. I learned these things early on through my family experience, especially from my grandparents and parents.  They were humble folk from humble beginnings in Tonga, but education, being prudent, hard work and serving others were central values and goals.

My mass communication, teaching, and strategic capacity-building experience were very handy when I was invited to set up a Pacific team at the Auckland Regional Public Health Service some 20 years ago. At the time I was starting to build the Pacific capacity of Massey University. I saw the invitation as an opportunity to do the same strategic work for Pacific peoples in the health sector as well. I was later seconded to build the Pacific capacity of HPF, which led to where I am today.  For more than 10 years, I shared my time between Massey University and HPF, until I decided recently to focus on my health work, for now.

 

And your strategic outcomes for the conference? 

There are at least three strategic outcomes. And the conference is a platform to enhance those long-term outcomes: Strengthen our co-leadership in health promotion at the global level, such as our work with IUHPE, which not only elevates the prestige of HPF, but more importantly, helps to build the capability and capacity of the health promotion workforce and sector in NZ and the world, for the wellbeing of society. Enhance our leading contribution to the world in Indigenous health promotion; Ensure the sustainable strength and longevity of HPF and the health promotion sector in New Zealand.

 

 

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New Zealand is walking the talk in the battle to tackle climate change with 18 health organisations as well as 60 businesses committing to decisive action on the issue.

On July 6 in a historic meeting for climate change and health, members of the leading health professional organisations, including the Health Promotion Forum of NZ, met with the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw, to add their support for a strong Zero Carbon Act.

Attendees at the meeting of health organisations hosted by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons were united in their call for decisive action on climate change to protect and improve health and fairness for New Zealanders.

“There is a strong consensus among health professionals that New Zealand needs a robust law to get to net zero greenhouse gas emissions,” said Dr Rhys Jones, co-convenor of OraTaiao, the NZ Climate & Health Council.

“A Zero Carbon Act will need to set targets and action that are fast, fair, firm and founded on Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Three decades of sitting on our hands means we now need to face the reality that all sectors must play their part in responding to the climate crisis. We need to reach net zero for all our greenhouse gas emissions by 2040.”

Sione Tui’tahi, HPF’s Executive Director who attended the meeting said it was encouraging to see members in the health sector working together for our collective wellbeing.

The Zero Carbon Bill consultation ends on July 19.

The move by the business community to take action has been praised as “strong” and “unprecedented” by local and global organisations.

CEOs have formed the Climate Leaders Coalition, recognising the role that business can play in bringing about change and signing a joint statement, which commits their companies to action.

By signing the CEO Climate Change Statement, each of the business leaders has committed to measuring and reporting their greenhouse gas emissions and working with suppliers to reduce emissions, with the aim of helping to keep global warming within 2C, as specified in the Paris Agreement.

Convenor of the coalition, Z Energy CEO, Mike Bennetts said: “I knew that many businesses were making progress with their own company’s response to climate change but that still left a gap around what we could be doing more of together to increase the pace and scale of impact from our collective efforts.

“So, it made sense to discuss those opportunities and commit to further action.”

The new group includes the leaders of Z, Westpac, Ngai Tahu Holdings, Vector, Air New Zealand, Spark and NZ Post.

 

 

Members of leading health organisations, including HPF, meeting with the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw to add their support for a strong Zero Carbon Act.

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Ramping up action to combat climate change is essential if we are to help our Pacific Island neighbours says the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw.

Mr Shaw made the comment after The Declaration for Ambition on climate change was signed by the High Ambition Coalition group of countries, including New Zealand, recently.

 The declaration underscores the urgency for countries to enhance their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) by 2020 in line with the Paris Agreement; put in place long-term strategies to reach net zero emissions; and secure the support and investment to ensure effective implementation.

Mr Shaw says as the world works towards the next United Nations climate change conference in Poland later this year, it is important to join with other countries to push for effective climate action and implementation of the Paris Agreement.

“This is about protecting a stable climate for future generations of people in New Zealand and around the world, and helping our Pacific neighbours avoid the potential impacts of climate change and rising seas,” Mr Shaw says.

The Pacific Islands as a group may be the planet’s most vulnerable nations to the effects of climate change, with some facing possible obliteration. The effects on families and communities can be devastating.

For most countries, a net zero target is widely seen as necessary to be consistent with promises made under the Paris climate treaty to limit global warming to well below 2C and ideally 1.5C, the level scientists agree is necessary to minimise climatic disruption and save low-lying island states.

According to Climate Action Network (CAN) The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on 1.5C, due to be released in October, is likely to confirm that limiting warming to 1.5C is feasible, but hard to achieve.

This makes it essential and urgent therefore for all countries to join these front-runners and step up to enhance their NDCs by 2020 states CAN.

Countries that signed the declaration promised to “lead from the front” on climate action.

They are Argentina, Britain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, Norway, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Spain and Sweden.

“We commit to exploring the possibilities for stepping up our own ambition, in light of the forthcoming IPCC Special Report on 1.5C, and in this context emphasise the importance of the Talanoa Dialogue at COP24,” the first line of the Declaration reads.

The Talanoa Dialogue which was launched at the UN Climate Change Conference COP23 in Bonn in November 2017 and will run throughout 2018 is the Fijian presidency of the UN climate talks initiative to encourage countries and businesses to showcase their climate action.

Health threats from climate changes include: worsening illness and injury from heat and other extreme weather, changing patterns of infection including food poisoning, loss of seafood and farming livelihoods, food price rises and mass migration from the Pacific. Those on low incomes, Māori, Pacific people, children and older people will be hit first and hardest, but nobody will be immune to the widespread health and social threats of unchecked climate change. Direct and indirect climate change impacts are already being seen here from warming oceans and sea level rise.

 

The north coast of the Tongatapu group, Tonga and the lagoons are low lying and vulnerable to sea-level rise. Here the effects of coastal erosion at Lifuka in the Ha’apai group are evident. (Photo: Tonga: LiDAR factsheet)

 

 

 

 

 

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New Zealand is part of 23 countries walking the talk when it comes to pushing for effective climate action.

The Declaration for Ambition on climate change was signed by the High Ambition Coalition group of countries, including New Zealand, recently.

The declaration underscores the urgency for countries to enhance their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) by 2020 in line with the Paris Agreement; put in place long-term strategies to reach net zero emissions and secure the support and investment to ensure effective implementation.

The Health Promotion Forum of NZ has welcomed the move to step up climate action.

HPF’s Executive Director, Sione Tu’itahi says it is heartening to see nations trying to work together for our collective wellbeing.

“Climate change must be addressed now if we are to offer a healthy future for our grandchildren,” he says.

Minister for Climate Change James Shaw says as the world works towards the next United Nations climate change conference in Poland later this year, it’s important to join with other countries to push for effective climate action and implementation of the Paris Agreement.

“Taking action to reduce emissions at home is important, which is why the Government is developing a Zero Carbon Bill …

“This is about protecting a stable climate for future generations of people in New Zealand and around the world, and helping our Pacific neighbours avoid the potential impacts of climate change and rising seas,” Mr Shaw says.

For most countries, a net zero target is widely seen as necessary to be consistent with promises made under the Paris climate treaty to limit global warming to well below 2C and ideally 1.5C, the level scientists agree is necessary to minimise climatic disruption and save low-lying island states.

The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on 1.5C, due to be released in October, is likely to confirm that limiting warming to 1.5C is feasible, but hard to achieve.

Climate Action Network International points out that this therefore makes it essential and urgent for all countries to join these front-runners and step up to enhance their NDCs by 2020.

Signatories to the declaration are Argentina, Britain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Spain and Sweden.

 

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Empowering, informative, inspiring and interactive were just some of the enthusiastic comments from participants at the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Auckland last week.

The Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) workshop held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre on June 15 focused on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective.

The workshop which was facilitated by HPF’s Dr Viliami Puloka was attended by 21 participants from around and outside Auckland.

Middlemore Hospital’s Delilah Hutcheson was impressed with the interactive group participation and the facilitator’s knowledge.

Ms Hutcheson said she planned to apply and incorporate what she gained from the workshop into their Pacific cultural competency training for new employees. “Some of the contents are invaluable.”

Jennifer Beatson of the Nelson Tasman Pacific Community Trust who was attending her first health promotion workshop said she learned so much; she was now eager to attend other health promotion courses.

“Health promotion will be an area… we will definitely be looking closely at,” she said.

Ngakiri Antonovich of the Northland Pacific Island Charitable Trust Inc said she now felt better and more informed to help Pacific people in Whangarei.

“My first introduction to Pacific health only just started two weeks ago. The stats and info provided at the workshop were great and informative.”

Having more empathy was also something participants agreed was a key part of the course.

“People don’t care what you know until they know how much you care. It is about building relationships, seeing where people are at and not pushing your values and ideas on them,” said Ms Antonovich.

Francis Latu of the Waitemata DHB said not only did she have a better understanding of what health promotion was all about but she learned to be more empathetic towards people’s situations.

Ms Hutcheson said she would be more aware of her surroundings and interactions with others. “Be proud to share what you know of your culture.”

Otara Health Charitable Trust’s Zondervan Fa’alafi said his attitude towards the Pacific community was challenged and renewed as a result of the workshop.

“I feel more competent, confident and compassionate in carrying out my work.”

Reverend Ifalemi Teisi encouraged other health workers to do the workshop which he described as “inspiring, and encouraging”.

Participants also enjoyed the one-plus-one number activity demonstrated by HPF’s Emma Frost, as well as the healthy and tasty morning tea and lunch.

“Yum,” was the general consensus.

Interesting stats from the workshop:

Pacific Profile: 2013 census

  • Pacific peoples make up 7.4% of NZ population
  • Fourth most common ethnic group
  • Two thirds Pacific born in NZ
  • Pacific ethnic profiles numbered 19
  • By 2026 project growth will be 10% of the population so an increase in NZ births, student body and workforce, taxpayer base, voters & consumers
  • Represented by 13 distinct languages and cultural groups born here and in the Pacific
  • High rates of intermarriage (redefining Pacific with mixed ethnicities)

 

Banner pic:

Dr Viliami Puloka, left, with participants at the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop on June 15.

 

 

Dr Viliami Puloka uses a map to show participants just how vast the Pacific region is. As he says: “Pasifika models enable Pasifika peoples to see the world through their own eyes and experience.”

 

Participants listen intently.

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A group launched in Switzerland last month is now ready to start forging a new path for improved indigenous health everywhere says the group’s Co-Chair Adrian Te Patu.

Mr Te Patu made the comment after the launch of the Indigenous Working Group (IWG) of the World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA) at the University of Geneva.

Mr Te Patu a WFPHA Governing Council member pointed out that public health experts and Indigenous health leaders around the world had been calling on their governments for recognition of Indigenous health as a top priority.

He thanked the particularly strong efforts by Australia and New Zealand over the past year.

Carmen Parter, Co-Chair and Vice President at the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) said this was a significant event for the 370 million Indigenous people worldwide.

“A key feature of the Indigenous Working Group is that it will be underpinned by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

“The Declaration strongly emphasises the need for Indigenous People’s self-determination and that’s why the Working Group will be led by indigenous people. We are the people who need to be driving change in health policy, because it is us, our families, and our communities who are suffering from this health inequity,” Ms Parter said.

Once in operation, the IWG will bring together indigenous peoples from around the world to exchange knowledge, engage in collective advocacy, form active partnerships, source funding and resources, and seek out research opportunities to develop the evidence base that informs global and national Indigenous public health policies.

This aligns with and will continue to support the WFPHA’s Global Charter for the Public’s Health and its Strategic Plan. In addition, it continues to contribute towards the goals and priority areas of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Meanwhile, the group’s launch joins another exciting initiative and a world-first for Māori and other indigenous cultures at the 23rd IUHPE World Health Promotion conference in Rotorua from April 7 to 11, 2019 which will feature Maori as one of its four official languages.

One of the underlying themes of the conference, co-hosted by HPF, is Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development. Click here for more info on the conference.

 

Banner picture:

SUPPORTIVE: Indigenous working group and associates support Rheumatic Heart Disease Action side event at World Health Assembly Geneva 2018. From left, Summer May Finlay (PHAA), Adrian Te Patu (PHANZ), Emma Rawson (PHANZ), the Minister for Health Dr David Clark and Dr Mariam Parwaiz (NZ).

 

READY-TO-ROLL: Co-Chairs Carmen Parter (PHAA) and Adrian Te Patu, front, and co-vice chairs Emma Rawson and Summer May Finlay on their way to the general assembly of the WFPHA.

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A report which outlines the harm caused by exposing children to alcohol at school fundraisers is a good move from a health promotion perspective says Dr Viliami Puloka.

 

The Hawke’s Bay District Health Board has endorsed the report which was prepared by Rowan Manhire-Heath with support from the Hawke’s Bay DHB Population Health and Business Intelligence teams and suggests ways schools can become alcohol-free .

According to the report the Hawke’s Bay population as a whole is drinking more hazardously than New Zealanders on average and of particular concern to the DHB is the presence and promotion of alcohol in schools and educational settings.

“The District Health Board is clear in its position: alcohol and schools do not mix,” it states.

Dr Puloka the Senior Health Promotion Strategist with HPF says when it comes to students, especially younger ones they often copy what they see adults are doing.

He says the big issue with drinking alcohol in a school setting was the role-modelling and wrong message that was being sent out.

Drinking alcohol in school settings he points out is inconsistent with what schools stand for, the safe environment they provide for young people and what is taught in class.

“They are brought up to embrace school and school authority so if they see alcohol sold or consumed at fundraisers and the like, they will think drinking is normal and act by association.”

By endorsing the report the DHB, he says, is giving out a powerful statement.

“We are not interfering with choice but we’re talking about providing the right environment and setting an example

“So from the Health Promotion Forum’s perspective this is a good message and should be extended to all schools.”

Dr Puloka adds that the report’s guidelines on how schools can develop their own alcohol policies are also a step in the right direction.

“HPF supports this move wholeheartedly. The guidelines are important part of policy directions.”

Currently, there is no legislation that prohibits the selling or supplying of alcohol on school property. Boards of Trustees currently decide school policy matters.

Report author and population health adviser Rowan Manhire-Heath told Hawkes Bay Today that the DHB was concerned at the pervasiveness of alcohol promotion and had the view that when alcohol was consumed in a school setting it reinforced the inaccurate perception that it was a safe product.

According to data collected by the DHB from March 2014 to October 2017 on the educational settings and types of events where a licence to sell alcohol was granted, 39 per cent of applications were from primary or intermediate schools, 29 per cent from secondary schools and six per cent from early childhood centres.

Lower decile schools were less likely to apply for a licence and quiz, casino, bingo, movie and auction nights were the most common events where an alcohol licence was granted and young people’s attendance was anticipated.

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There is evidence that the attitude towards spirituality and health is changing says Health Promotion Forum’s deputy chair Richard Egan.

 

Mr Egan who is a lecturer in health promotion at the Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago made the comment after returning from the 6th European Conference on Religion, Spirituality and Health and the 5th International Conference of the British Association for the Study of Spirituality from May 17 to 19  at Coventry University in the UK. The theme was forgiveness.

Mr Egan says when working with people and populations, there is a strong argument to include the spiritual dimension.

“Sitting within such models as Te Whare Tapa Wha, Fono Fale, total care and person-centred approaches, spirituality has often been overlooked. There is some evidence that this is changing,” he says.

“I have been working in the spirituality and research area for over a decade and applaud this renewed focus on forgiveness as an important element of spiritual care.”

Mr Egan says forgiveness has a long religious spiritual history, but a range of researchers have examined it in healthcare and developed therapeutic and educational forgiveness resources.

“In healthcare there is evidence that blame and guilt are common and has debilitating effects among healthcare professionals,” he says.

“American psychologist Professor Robert Enright argues, with research to support his claims that behind what he calls secondary effects such as anxiety, depression and even suicide is a primary effect of anger due to injustice. This primary effect it is suggested, is causal in the pathway of many illnesses, through immune system responses.“

Mr Egan says key authors in the field have developed theory-based interventions and education projects that enable people to deal with injustice.

However he points out that what this work does not do is challenge top-down policy, structures and practice that proliferates injustice and inequity.

“Perhaps forgiveness education may act in time as a bottom-up impetus for change. But certainly spirituality and its component forgiveness have place in ongoing transformation. “

 

Richard Egan is  is a lecturer in health promotion, based in the Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit, Department of Preventive & Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago. Mr Egan’s Master’s thesis examined spirituality in New Zealand state schools, his PhD thesis explored spirituality in end-of-life care and he has qualifications in theology, English literature, religious studies, and public health.

 

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A residential weekend/retreat to explore anti-racism and our Tiriti o Waitangi responsibilities to Māori will be held in Auckland in November.

 

Master Class: Strengthening Anti-Racism Praxis is an interactive programme tailored to participants with a focus on fostering practical strategies to eliminate racism.

The retreat to be held from November 9  to 11 at Kotare: Centre for Social Change, Hoteo North is a safe space tailored to participants with a focus on fostering practical strategies to eliminate racism.

It includes technical input, skill-sharing, problem-solving, planning, network building and time with activist elders.

The facilitators are Susan da Silva, Dr Heather Came and Italian/English activist, Miriam Gioia Sessa.

Ms da Silva is well-known in Northland and throughout New Zealand for her work with te Tiriti o Waitangi issues. She has worked with organisations nationally, regionally and locally providing professional development for staff working in early childhood, social services and health services.

Since her arrival in Northland, Susan has worked as the Paediatric Social Worker for the Northland DHB and, after 15 years at NorthTec, she is now a Social Worker at Whangarei Boys High School.

Dr Came is a seventh generation New Zealander with an extensive  background in the health sector and social justice activism.

An activist scholar based at Auckland University of Technology she is a member of Tāmaki Tiriti Workers and founding member of STIR: Stop Institutional Racism.

Miriam Gioia Sessa is an Italian/English activist who began feminist and social justice activism at 14 while living Rome. She is currently working in the sexual violence sector in New Zealand.

The retreat will start at 6 pm on Friday night and finish at 2pm on Sunday.

The cost is $250 for institution and $115 for other with free registration for those coming from the South Island or overseas.

A maximum of 25 participants with a base understanding of Te Tiriti o Waitangi is required.

Contact heather.came@yahoo.co.nz  or 021 539063 for registration form and more details.

 

 

 

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A great learning experience, an eye-opener and thoroughly enjoyable were some of the comments from participants who attended a health promotion course in Auckland recently.

The Manukau Institute of Technology Certificate of Achievement in Introducing Health Promotion was held in two four-day blocks from April 17 to 20 and May 15 to 18.

The part-time short course introduces students to the principles, concepts and practice of health promotion and relates theory to their own experiences, knowledge and skills.

Participants agreed that what they learned at the course was invaluable in their day-to-day work and they all gained a deeper understanding and an appreciation of what health promotion was all about.

Limiva Fonmanu a health worker with Mobile Chronic Disease Management, K’aute Pasifika Health Unit said she thoroughly enjoyed the whole two blocks of learning.

“The teaching by Trevor is so amazing and he has a unique approach to helping us understand things, especially with his vast knowledge around Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to health promotion.  I have done some courses whereby te Tiriti has been included and explained but not to this depth and many things were clarified.

“In my line of work as a community health worker I do a lot of health education but through this course, I noted that it is mainly individual-based,” said Limiva.  “After learning about the Ottawa Charter to the extent we did made me look back at how I am doing things with my community and what things I can do to better my service for them in terms of health promotion.

“This is a course that I will surely recommend for fellow colleagues to do especially with the amount of information there is to gain.”

Tomairangi Chaffey-Aupouri a student at Waikato University said she was able to gain a deeper understanding of how health promotion worked in relation to te Tiriti.

“I learned heaps at the course, it was awesome,” she said.

Avalu Tausala of the Akihuho Trust said learning about the Ottawa Charter and the determinants of health were important for her because she was studying to be a social worker and was writing a report on diabetes.

“Some people questioned the connection between diabetes and social work but doing this course helped me to gain a deeper understanding that it is all related.”

Participants wrapped up the course with team presentations that showcased not only what they had learned and understood but how creatively they were able to get their message across to their audience.

They divided into two groups and had 25 minutes to present their selected topics which were alcoholism and rheumatic fever. Working as groups with allotted time limits enhanced their ability to collaborate as a team, think creatively and out-of-the-box and manage their time effectively they all agreed.

The team presentation was a great chance to be able to work closely with other people she didn’t know, said Tomairangi.

“Coming from Gisborne we all know each other,” she laughed. “Developing personal skills was a good part of the group discussion as well as effective time management.”

“Everyone’s Mauri Ora was uplifted after the presentations,” said Avalu.

Cleopatra Matthews of the Women’s Health Trust said the presentations were good for team bonding and there were no butting of heads. “Everyone had a voice.”

The course covers the meaning of health promotion, determinants of health, the application of Te Tiriti o Waitangi to health promotion, the Ottawa Charter, an overview of key health promotion strategies and skills, values and ethics and learning and study skills.

In the photo:

ENTHUSIASTIC: Front from left, Trevor Simpson, tutor, Mita Tupaea, Te Kaha o Te Rangatahi (Whanau o Tamaki Makaurau), Letari Tepana, Te Ahurei a Rangatahi Trust, Te One Matthews, Te Kaha o Te Rangatahi (Whanau o Tamaki Makaurau), Emma Frost, Health Promotion Forum’s Activities Coordinator and Office Manager and Leonora Houma, Solomon Islands of Waikato. Back, Cleopatra Matthews, Women’s Health Trust, Jessica Gosche, Waikato District Health Board, Tomairangi Chaffey-Aupouri, Waikato University, Avalu Tausala, Akihuho Trust, Lilly Rawiri, Te Kaha o Te Rangatahi and Limiva Fonmanu, Mobile Chronic Disease Management, K’aute Pasifika Health Unit.

 

 

 

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Competencies

With registrations open for two health promotion workshops next month now is your chance to get in and boost your health promotion competency.

The Māori Concepts of Health Promotion workshop will be held in Blenheim on June 1 and the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Auckland on June 15.

The Māori Concepts workshop aims to introduce participants to shared understandings of traditional Māori concepts, ideologies and practices in relation to health and wellbeing.

Additionally the workshop will consider how these ideas may be used to inform modern-day approaches to Māori health promotion planning, implementation and evaluation.

Course facilitator and deputy director of the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), Trevor Simpson says Maori identity is the key philosophy behind the workshop.

“The course looks at world views and how those traditional world views can inform contemporary Māori practice,” says Mr Simpson.

The workshop will be held at St John, Marlborough, 93 Seymour St, Blenheim from 9.30am to 3.30pm.

The Pasifika Health Promotion workshop will focus on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective and will trace the history of Pacific health promotion in New Zealand and discuss how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

It aims to equip Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools to address the social determinants of health and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to take control of their health and wellbeing.

Course facilitator, Dr Viliami Puloka says although the course looked at how non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer impacted the wellbeing of the Pacific community the emphasis was not on sickness or disease but on the contributing factors.

“The disease aspect will come in only as a result of what contributed to it,” says Dr Puloka who is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion.

“Physical health is just a bit of what makes you healthy. We are looking at health as a resource of living rather than a destination you arrive at. In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.”

The workshop will be held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre.

To register or for more information contact Emma Frost at emma@hauora.co.nz or 09 300 3734.

 

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Global, Maori health promotion

Having Te Reo Maori as one of the four official languages of the World Conference on Health Promotion in New Zealand next year is a world-first for Maori and other Indigenous cultures.

The 23rd IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All will be held in Rotorua from April 7-11.

Like the other dying languages of the 370 million Indigenous peoples of the world, Te Reo Maori is the repository for the Maori culture – values, knowledge, practices and history.

Sione Tu’itahi, the conference co-chair and Executive Director of the Health Promotion Forum which is the local co-host, says having Te Reo Maori as one of the four official languages of the conference is one way of acknowledging the rights of Indigenous peoples.

“Te Reo Maori is the native tongue of Maori, the Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand.  It is also one of the official languages of our country,” says Mr Tu’itahi.

“Given that we are co-hosting this world conference, it is only right that we honour Te Reo Maori this way, especially when it is rights guaranteed for Tangata Whenua under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the founding document of modern New Zealand.”

One of the underlying themes of the conference, Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development can offer solutions to our global challenges today, adds Mr Tu’itahi. “Indigenous knowledge enunciates that humanity and its environment are one. But we are confronted by environmental challenges, including climate changes, because of our dominant mainstream approach of separating humanity from the rest of the environment and exploiting the latter for our socio-economic gains.”

Trevor Simpson, the Deputy Executive Director/Senior Health Promotion Strategist (with Portfolio in Māori development) says “for the first time an indigenous plenary speaker will address the IUHPE World Conference in our indigenous language, Te Reo Maori”.

“This in turn will be simultaneously translated into the other three official languages of the conference – English, French and Spanish. This presents a wonderful opportunity for Aotearoa, New Zealand to take a leading role in building indigenous notions of health promotion through promoting the use of indigenous language.”

Mr Simpson points out that Maori Health Promotion is premised on the idea that world views and cultural identity are central and imperative to achieving positive Maori health outcomes.

“Te Reo Maori provides the basis for understanding how these views are formed in the first place and also illustrates how identity, language and wellbeing are intertwined.”

The conference theme sets the direction and intent of the conference that will attract health professionals, development experts, policy-makers and other professional leaders to Rotorua, the first city to be bi-lingual, and also the cultural capital of New Zealand.

A highly educational and informative scientific programme is being drafted while an equally attractive social programme is being shaped up.

 

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Global, Uncategorized

Abstracts for the World Conference on Health Promotion that will be held in New Zealand next year must be in by August 31.

Submissions for the 23rd International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) World Conference on Health Promotion to be held in Rotorua from April 7 to 11 can be made in English, Spanish, French and Te Reo Māori.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is hosting the conference in association with the IUHPE.

The approximate date of acceptance of abstracts is October 22 and all abstracts must be submitted through this online form.

All abstract submitters, including individual contributors, are encouraged to interact and collaborate with other presenters and participants wherever possible. Participatory, collaborative and non-traditional session formats will be given priority in the selection process.

Abstracts can be submitted in eight different formats: symposium; workshop;  research oral/poster presentation; innovation in policy and practice oral/poster presentation; round table discussion; alternative showing/new technology;  alternative showing/art and lunch with an author.

The committee is encouraging submissions to match the sub-themes of the conference. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the four conference sub-themes:

Health equity 
Ensure health equity throughout the life course, within and among countries, making each member of the global society an empowered lifelong learner.

Inclusive habitats 
Make all urban and other habitats inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and conducive to health and wellbeing.

Climate change adaptation strategies 
Design and implement effective and fair climate change adaptation strategies.

Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance 
Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance at all levels that promotes, peace, justice and respect of human rights.

For further information on each of these formats please click here.

 

 

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Maori health promotion

Plans are underway to develop a training manual from a Te Tiriti-based health promotion resource that has been well received by health promoters.

Dr Heather Came who is one of the authors of Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion says the manual is currently in development with another of the booklet’s authors, Dr Nicole Coupe leading the work.

“We need to regroup and talk about it but the intention is that we are keen to find folk willing to extend the reach of the resource,” says Dr Came, who has worked for nearly 25 years in health promotion, public and Māori health and has had a long involvement in social justice activism.

Aimed at the health promotion workforce, the free resource which is published by STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) was launched in Auckland on January 28 this year and is available online and in print. It builds on the legacy of Dr Irihapeti Ramsden and cultural safety in nursing.

Dr Came, who is a senior lecturer based in the Taupua Waiora Māori  Health Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology says they have had feedback that the resource is useful and academics have been using it as a teaching tool.

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi … if you’re following the treaty than you’re not practising racism,” she said.

“It’s a smorgasbord of ideas about how to implement te Tiriti in your practice.”

Dr Came says however that the debate over te Tiriti continues to evolve as evidenced by the Waitangi Tribunal’s finding in 2014 that Ngapuhi did not cede their sovereignty when they signed te Tiriti in 1840.

 

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi.”

Dr Heather Came

 

“So the intention was to add to and strengthen the resource every five years as things continue to evolve,” she explains.

Although the resource is written for practitioners, teachers and those working in the health promotion field Dr Came believes it would be of interest to people outside the sector, as well as a Tau Iwi audience.

Well-known and respected Māori activist and lawyer from Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Porou specialising in Treaty and constitutional issues, Moana Jackson says in the booklet’s foreword it is appropriate that the resource is dedicated to Dr Irihapeti Ramsden.

“As a nurse and deep-thinking philosopher she was committed to finding practical ways to give effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi; especially in health,” says Mr Jackson.

“Her promotion of the concept of cultural safety in nursing recognised the power dynamics at play in any relationship between health professionals and those in their care. In a very real sense it was based in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and was thus a recognition that the Tiriti-Treaty relationship is also about power.”

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved … and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

Moana Jackson

Mr Jackson said the resource built upon that recognition and in a carefully considered and practical way offers guidance for all who work in the health sector to manage and develop their Treaty-based practice in ways that recognise the power relationships it enshrines.

He acknowledged that the resource was timely as it reflected the evolving understanding of te Tiriti that has occurred since the 1970s.

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved in compiling and editing this resource and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

STIR is a group of senior public health practitioners and activist researchers who aim to end racism in the public health sector.

Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director of The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), one of the supporters of the resource, said “we are proud to be party to the development of this resource because te Tiriti and the Ottawa Charter are the two documents upon which health promotion is based in New Zealand”.

“Māori health promotion contributes, among other things, indigenous opportunities, values and tools to health promotion which enrich our understanding of health promotion in New Zealand and the rest of the world.”

Deputy Executive Director of HPF, Trevor Simpson, whose interests are in raising the profile of Māori issues particularly in the areas of health and matters of social importance, is one of the authors of the resource.

The other authors are: Grant Berghan, Claire Doole, Dr Jonathan Fay and Dr Tim McCreanor.

More about Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion

The resource which is inspired by activist scholarship and explores the ways in which senior health promoters work with the articles of te Tiriti and its aspirations starts by outlining the importance of te Tiriti to health promotion practice in Aotearoa. It then sets out the research method on which this resource is based, and from which deeper engagement is advocated with te Tiriti-based practice, anti-racism and decolonisation.

“We locate te Tiriti as a sequel to Her Wakaputanga o Nu Tireni (the Declaration of Independence). We next orient readers to each of the articles of the Maori text of te Tiriti as it relates to health promotion in Aotearoa … Under each article of te Tiriti we introduce relevant research, information from this study and insights from the authors’ experiences related to te Tiriti. The final section draws out the core elements of Tiriti-based practice,” write the authors.

 

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Global

A top line-up of speakers from around the world and New Zealand has been confirmed for the world health promotion conference in Rotorua, New Zealand next year.

The theme of the 23rd IHUPE (International Union for Health Promotion and Education) Health conference to be held from April 7 to 11 is Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is co-hosting the conference which is expected to be attended by 2000 delegates from all over the world..

Co-chairs of the conference Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director, Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand and Graham Robertson, President, IUHPE, say the conference will be invaluable for those in the sector to exchange knowledge and build networks in order to: share strategies, policies and practices; present results and assess progress; influence policy and bring about positive change and promote health and equity amongst all people.

The chance to hear from internationally-recognised speakers such as Professor Anthony Capon from the University of Sydney and Professor Fran Baum from Flinders University, Adelaide is also too good an opportunity to miss.

Prof Capon is the world’s first professor of planetary health and an authority on environmental health and health promotion while Prof Baum from Flinders University, Adelaide is one of Australia’s leading researchers on the social and economic determinants of health.

Prof Capon, who was born in New Zealand and moved to Brisbane with his family when he was a young boy, is a public health physician with more than 25 years of senior leadership experience, spanning academic, policy and practice roles.

“Planetary health is about safeguarding the health and wellbeing of current and future generations through good stewardship of Earth’s natural systems and by rethinking the way we feed, move, house, power, and care for the world (something missing here?), “ Professor Capon told Lancet recently.

Capon thinks that, “the central challenge of planetary health is to greatly reduce per capita resource consumption in high-income countries (HICs) to make room for further sustainable development in other countries”.

He also told the journal that: “If everyone in the world lived as the average Australian does, we would need four or five planets … we urgently need to contract per capita consumption in HICs to about 20% of what it is now so that all people can have a fair share of the Earth. And with less focus on materialism, we may indeed lead more fulfilling, and healthier, lives in tune with nature for the world.”

The former director of the global health institute at United Nations University (UNU-IIGH) has also since 2008 advised the International Council for Science on its global interdisciplinary science programme on health and wellbeing in the changing urban environment using systems approaches.

Prof Baum is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Foundation Director of the Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity at Flinders University.

Prof Baum was named in the Queen’s Birthday 2016 Honours List as an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for “distinguished service to higher education as an academic and public health researcher, as an advocate for improved access to community health care, and to professional organisations”.

Prof Baum told ABC Online, in an article on mental illness and poverty last month, that reducing levels of mental distress, and closing health inequalities, would require a rethinking of Australia’s direction as a society.

“I would have thought in the last 30 years, when rates of anxiety and depression have gone up in Western countries, there’s some clear clues from the economic system and society we’re creating.”

This system includes a dramatic rise in precarious and casualised work, a trend Prof Baum says could exacerbate pressures of powerlessness and poverty.

According to ABC Online she is writing a book on the subject of health inequality, and one of the unavoidable conclusions of her research is that health reform is political.

Her preliminary recommendations include reducing economic inequality, making public education free and available to all and providing more affordable and secure housing, to name a few.

Prof Baum holds grants from the National Health & Medical Research Council and the Australia Research Council which are considering a wide range of aspects of health inequities and social determinants of health.  These grants include an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence on Policies for Health Equity of which she is one of the two co-directors.

Her book, The New Public Health (4th ed. published January 2016 Oxford University Press), is widely cited and used in many public health courses.

Other speakers confirmed for the conference are:  Anne Bunde-Birouste, director of the UNSW Yunus Social Business for Health Hub; Dr Trevor Hancock, a public health physician and health promotion consultant from the University of Victoria, Canada; Patrick Mwesigye Sewa, founder and team leader at the Uganda Youth and Adolescents Health Forum; Colin Tukuitonga, Director General of the Pacific Community and Dr Stanley Vollant who practises  at the Notre-Dame community hospital in Montreal.

The IUHPE world conferences are renowned events for bringing together leading professionals in all corners of the world to take stock of the present state of knowledge and experiences, bring forward future challenges and shape the agenda to advance developments in health promotion.

Every three years, the conference defines the “state of the art” in health promotion practice, research, and theory.

The aim of the 2019 conference is to provide an unparalleled opportunity to link and demonstrate the contribution of health promotion to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and to acknowledge the way SDGs contribute to improvements in health and wellbeing.

To find out more please click here.

 

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News

Registrations are open so get in quick for the chance to attend and boost your health promotion competency at the Pasifika Health Promotion Workshop in Auckland on June 15.

The Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) workshop to be held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre from 9.30am to 3.30pm will focus on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective.

The workshop will trace the history of Pacific health promotion in New Zealand and discuss how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

It aims to equip Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools to address the social determinants of health and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to take control of their health and wellbeing.

Course facilitator, Dr Viliami Puloka said although the course looked at how non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer impacted the wellbeing of the Pacific community the emphasis was not on sickness or disease but on the contributing factors.

Dr Puloka said being healthy was not just about the absence of sickness but about a complete sense of wellbeing.

“So the disease aspect will come in only as a result of what contributed to it. Physical health is just a bit of what makes you healthy. We are looking at health as a resource of living rather than a destination you arrive at,” he said.

“In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.”

The workshop is primarily designed for health workers working with Pacific communities. Pacific community leaders and non-Pacific health workers who are working with Pacific communities are encouraged to join the workshop.

If you would like to attend please click here to complete the online registration form.

Contact Emma Frost for further information on emma@hauora.co.nz or 09 300 3734

Dr Puloka is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion. For more on Dr Puloka click here.

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