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Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Runanga Whakapiki Ake i te Hauora o Aotearoa
News

STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) has made two submissions to the Government on Health & Disability Workforce Strategic Priorities and the Health Sector Review.

The submissions by STIR, which is a network of public health professionals and scholars committed to ending institutional racism in the administration of the public health sector, are endorsed by the Health Promotion Forum of NZ (HPF).

Health & Disability Workforce Strategic Priorities

The group’s submission on workforce priorities was structured in three parts: feedback on the consultation process itself; STIR’s health workforce priorities and feedback on the ministry’s health workforce priorities.

Among the concerns raised by STIR is the need for a substantially greater commitment to Māori health demonstrated through the reprioritisation of financial investment into Māori health.

STIR maintains that it wants to see greater accountability for Māori health at all levels of the health sector; from political leaders, to health management, through to contracted providers and health practitioners. People run the health system and need to be held accountable for their practice; this is a workforce issue. 

The group recommends the development of a new multi-disciplinary Māori health workforce strategy for the regulated and unregulated health workforces.

STIR points out that at a local level the ethnic make-up of the health workforce should match local population levels. For instance, in communities comprising 25% Māori, this should be mirrored in the local health workforce.

“We urge the Ministry of Health to establish a single repository for Māori health workforce data to enable tracking of progress towards targets. Ethnicity data also needs to be systematically collected across all points of the health sector to allow informed workforce planning.”

STIR would also like to see greater investment in Māori leadership programmes such as the successful Ngā Manukura o Āpōpō programme run by Digital Indigenous.

Health Sector Review

In its submission on the Health Sector Review STIR answered nine questions focusing on issues including how the best health and disability system for New Zealand might look in 2030;  changes to make the system more fair and equal for everyone and what changes could most improve health for Māori and Pacific peoples

In response to the first question STIR answered that from the authors’ perspectives there are three core values integral for the future health and disability system: A commitment to i) honour te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Māori text that reaffirmed tino rangatiratanga as opposed to the English version) , ii) embracing anti-racism praxis and iii) the pursuit of  health equity.

“These values must be reflected at all levels of the health system and engage practitioners, managers and policy makers. We must all be held accountable for our professional practice in these key areas,” STIR states.

STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) has made two submissions to the Government on Health & Disability Workforce Strategic Priorities and the Health Sector Review.

The submissions by STIR, which is a network of public health professionals and scholars committed to ending institutional racism in the administration of the public health sector, are endorsed by the Health Promotion Forum of NZ (HPF).

The group’s submission on workforce priorities was structured in three parts: feedback on the consultation process itself; STIR’s health workforce priorities and feedback on the ministry’s health workforce priorities.

STIR addresses a number of concerns including the need for a substantially greater commitment to Māori health and the development of a new multi-disciplinary Māori health workforce strategy for the regulated and unregulated health workforces.

STIR maintains that at a local level, the ethnic makeup of the health workforce should match local population levels. For instance, in communities comprising 25% Māori, this should be mirrored in the local health workforce.

In its submission on the Health Sector Review STIR answered nine questions focusing on issues like how the best health and disability system for New Zealand might look in 2030;  changes to make the system more fair and equal for everyone and what changes could most improve health for Māori and Pacific peoples.

From the authors’ perspectives there are three core values integral for the future health and disability system: A commitment to i) honour te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Māori text that reaffirmed tino rangatiratanga as opposed to the English version) , ii) embracing anti-racism praxis and iii) the pursuit of  health equity.

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