Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Runanga Whakapiki Ake i te Hauora o Aotearoa
Competencies

With registrations open for two health promotion workshops next month now is your chance to get in and boost your health promotion competency.

The Māori Concepts of Health Promotion workshop will be held in Blenheim on June 1 and the Pasifika Health Promotion workshop in Auckland on June 15.

The Māori Concepts workshop aims to introduce participants to shared understandings of traditional Māori concepts, ideologies and practices in relation to health and wellbeing.

Additionally the workshop will consider how these ideas may be used to inform modern-day approaches to Māori health promotion planning, implementation and evaluation.

Course facilitator and deputy director of the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), Trevor Simpson says Maori identity is the key philosophy behind the workshop.

“The course looks at world views and how those traditional world views can inform contemporary Māori practice,” says Mr Simpson.

The workshop will be held at St John, Marlborough, 93 Seymour St, Blenheim from 9.30am to 3.30pm.

The Pasifika Health Promotion workshop will focus on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective and will trace the history of Pacific health promotion in New Zealand and discuss how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

It aims to equip Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools to address the social determinants of health and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to take control of their health and wellbeing.

Course facilitator, Dr Viliami Puloka says although the course looked at how non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer impacted the wellbeing of the Pacific community the emphasis was not on sickness or disease but on the contributing factors.

“The disease aspect will come in only as a result of what contributed to it,” says Dr Puloka who is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion.

“Physical health is just a bit of what makes you healthy. We are looking at health as a resource of living rather than a destination you arrive at. In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.”

The workshop will be held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre.

To register or for more information contact Emma Frost at emma@hauora.co.nz or 09 300 3734.

 

0

Global, Maori health promotion

Having Te Reo Maori as one of the four official languages of the World Conference on Health Promotion in New Zealand next year is a world-first for Maori and other Indigenous cultures.

The 23rd IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All will be held in Rotorua from April 7-11.

Like the other dying languages of the 370 million Indigenous peoples of the world, Te Reo Maori is the repository for the Maori culture – values, knowledge, practices and history.

Sione Tui’tahi, the conference co-chair and Executive Director of the Health Promotion Forum which is the local co-host, says having Te Reo Maori as one of the four official languages of the conference is one way of acknowledging the rights of Indigenous peoples.

“Te Reo Maori is the native tongue of Maori, the Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand.  It is also one of the official languages of our country,” says Mr Tui’tahi.

“Given that we are co-hosting this world conference, it is only right that we honour Te Reo Maori this way, especially when it is rights guaranteed for Tangata Whenua under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the founding document of modern New Zealand.”

One of the underlying themes of the conference, Indigenous knowledge on health promotion and sustainable development can offer solutions to our global challenges today, adds Mr Tu’itahi. “Indigenous knowledge enunciates that humanity and its environment are one. But we are confronted by environmental challenges, including climate changes, because of our dominant mainstream approach of separating humanity from the rest of the environment and exploiting the latter for our socio-economic gains.”

Trevor Simpson, the Deputy Executive Director/Senior Health Promotion Strategist (with Portfolio in Māori development) says “for the first time an indigenous plenary speaker will address the IUHPE World Conference in our indigenous language, Te Reo Maori”.

“This in turn will be simultaneously translated into the other three official languages of the conference – English, French and Spanish. This presents a wonderful opportunity for Aotearoa, New Zealand to take a leading role in building indigenous notions of health promotion through promoting the use of indigenous language.”

Mr Simpson points out that Maori Health Promotion is premised on the idea that world views and cultural identity are central and imperative to achieving positive Maori health outcomes.

“Te Reo Maori provides the basis for understanding how these views are formed in the first place and also illustrates how identity, language and wellbeing are intertwined.”

The conference theme sets the direction and intent of the conference that will attract health professionals, development experts, policy-makers and other professional leaders to Rotorua, the first city to be bi-lingual, and also the cultural capital of New Zealand.

A highly educational and informative scientific programme is being drafted while an equally attractive social programme is being shaped up.

 

0

Global, Uncategorized

Abstracts for the World Conference on Health Promotion that will be held in New Zealand next year must be in by August 31.

Submissions for the 23rd International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) World Conference on Health Promotion to be held in Rotorua from April 7 to 11 can be made in English, Spanish, French and Te Reo Māori.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is hosting the conference in association with the IUHPE.

The approximate date of acceptance of abstracts is October 22 and all abstracts must be submitted through this online form.

All abstract submitters, including individual contributors, are encouraged to interact and collaborate with other presenters and participants wherever possible. Participatory, collaborative and non-traditional session formats will be given priority in the selection process.

Abstracts can be submitted in eight different formats: symposium; workshop;  research oral/poster presentation; innovation in policy and practice oral/poster presentation; round table discussion; alternative showing/new technology;  alternative showing/art and lunch with an author.

The committee is encouraging submissions to match the sub-themes of the conference. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the four conference sub-themes:

Health equity 
Ensure health equity throughout the life course, within and among countries, making each member of the global society an empowered lifelong learner.

Inclusive habitats 
Make all urban and other habitats inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and conducive to health and wellbeing.

Climate change adaptation strategies 
Design and implement effective and fair climate change adaptation strategies.

Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance 
Build effective, accountable and inclusive governance at all levels that promotes, peace, justice and respect of human rights.

For further information on each of these formats please click here.

 

 

0

Maori health promotion

Plans are underway to develop a training manual from a Te Tiriti-based health promotion resource that has been well received by health promoters.

Dr Heather Came who is one of the authors of Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion says the manual is currently in development with another of the booklet’s authors, Dr Nicole Coupe leading the work.

“We need to regroup and talk about it but the intention is that we are keen to find folk willing to extend the reach of the resource,” says Dr Came, who has worked for nearly 25 years in health promotion, public and Māori health and has had a long involvement in social justice activism.

Aimed at the health promotion workforce, the free resource which is published by STIR (Stop Institutional Racism) was launched in Auckland on January 28 this year and is available online and in print. It builds on the legacy of Dr Irihapeti Ramsden and cultural safety in nursing.

Dr Came, who is a senior lecturer based in the Taupua Waiora Māori  Health Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology says they have had feedback that the resource is useful and academics have been using it as a teaching tool.

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi … if you’re following the treaty than you’re not practising racism,” she said.

“It’s a smorgasbord of ideas about how to implement te Tiriti in your practice.”

Dr Came says however that the debate over te Tiriti continues to evolve as evidenced by the Waitangi Tribunal’s finding in 2014 that Ngapuhi did not cede their sovereignty when they signed te Tiriti in 1840.

 

“We had been thinking about producing something to end institutional racism in the public sector and one of the ways was to honour Te Tiriti o Wāitangi.”

Dr Heather Came

 

“So the intention was to add to and strengthen the resource every five years as things continue to evolve,” she explains.

Although the resource is written for practitioners, teachers and those working in the health promotion field Dr Came believes it would be of interest to people outside the sector, as well as a Tau Iwi audience.

Well-known and respected Māori activist and lawyer from Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Porou specialising in Treaty and constitutional issues, Moana Jackson says in the booklet’s foreword it is appropriate that the resource is dedicated to Dr Irihapeti Ramsden.

“As a nurse and deep-thinking philosopher she was committed to finding practical ways to give effect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi; especially in health,” says Mr Jackson.

“Her promotion of the concept of cultural safety in nursing recognised the power dynamics at play in any relationship between health professionals and those in their care. In a very real sense it was based in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and was thus a recognition that the Tiriti-Treaty relationship is also about power.”

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved … and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

Moana Jackson

Mr Jackson said the resource built upon that recognition and in a carefully considered and practical way offers guidance for all who work in the health sector to manage and develop their Treaty-based practice in ways that recognise the power relationships it enshrines.

He acknowledged that the resource was timely as it reflected the evolving understanding of te Tiriti that has occurred since the 1970s.

“I am grateful for the work done by all of those involved in compiling and editing this resource and commend it not just to people involved in the health professions but to everyone who chooses to live in this land.”

STIR is a group of senior public health practitioners and activist researchers who aim to end racism in the public health sector.

Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director of The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF), one of the supporters of the resource, said “we are proud to be party to the development of this resource because te Tiriti and the Ottawa Charter are the two documents upon which health promotion is based in New Zealand”.

“Māori health promotion contributes, among other things, indigenous opportunities, values and tools to health promotion which enrich our understanding of health promotion in New Zealand and the rest of the world.”

Deputy Executive Director of HPF, Trevor Simpson, whose interests are in raising the profile of Māori issues particularly in the areas of health and matters of social importance, is one of the authors of the resource.

The other authors are: Grant Berghan, Claire Doole, Dr Jonathan Fay and Dr Tim McCreanor.

More about Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based practice in Health Promotion

The resource which is inspired by activist scholarship and explores the ways in which senior health promoters work with the articles of te Tiriti and its aspirations starts by outlining the importance of te Tiriti to health promotion practice in Aotearoa. It then sets out the research method on which this resource is based, and from which deeper engagement is advocated with te Tiriti-based practice, anti-racism and decolonisation.

“We locate te Tiriti as a sequel to Her Wakaputanga o Nu Tireni (the Declaration of Independence). We next orient readers to each of the articles of the Maori text of te Tiriti as it relates to health promotion in Aotearoa … Under each article of te Tiriti we introduce relevant research, information from this study and insights from the authors’ experiences related to te Tiriti. The final section draws out the core elements of Tiriti-based practice,” write the authors.

 

0

Global

A top line-up of speakers from around the world and New Zealand has been confirmed for the world health promotion conference in Rotorua, New Zealand next year.

The theme of the 23rd IHUPE (International Union for Health Promotion and Education) Health conference to be held from April 7 to 11 is Waiora: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All.

The Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand (HPF) is co-hosting the conference which is expected to be attended by 2000 delegates from all over the world..

Co-chairs of the conference Sione Tui’tahi, Executive Director, Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand and Graham Robertson, President, IUHPE, say the conference will be invaluable for those in the sector to exchange knowledge and build networks in order to: share strategies, policies and practices; present results and assess progress; influence policy and bring about positive change and promote health and equity amongst all people.

The chance to hear from internationally-recognised speakers such as Professor Anthony Capon from the University of Sydney and Professor Fran Baum from Flinders University, Adelaide is also too good an opportunity to miss.

Prof Capon is the world’s first professor of planetary health and an authority on environmental health and health promotion while Prof Baum from Flinders University, Adelaide is one of Australia’s leading researchers on the social and economic determinants of health.

Prof Capon, who was born in New Zealand and moved to Brisbane with his family when he was a young boy, is a public health physician with more than 25 years of senior leadership experience, spanning academic, policy and practice roles.

“Planetary health is about safeguarding the health and wellbeing of current and future generations through good stewardship of Earth’s natural systems and by rethinking the way we feed, move, house, power, and care for the world (something missing here?), “ Professor Capon told Lancet recently.

Capon thinks that, “the central challenge of planetary health is to greatly reduce per capita resource consumption in high-income countries (HICs) to make room for further sustainable development in other countries”.

He also told the journal that: “If everyone in the world lived as the average Australian does, we would need four or five planets … we urgently need to contract per capita consumption in HICs to about 20% of what it is now so that all people can have a fair share of the Earth. And with less focus on materialism, we may indeed lead more fulfilling, and healthier, lives in tune with nature for the world.”

The former director of the global health institute at United Nations University (UNU-IIGH) has also since 2008 advised the International Council for Science on its global interdisciplinary science programme on health and wellbeing in the changing urban environment using systems approaches.

Prof Baum is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Foundation Director of the Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity at Flinders University.

Prof Baum was named in the Queen’s Birthday 2016 Honours List as an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for “distinguished service to higher education as an academic and public health researcher, as an advocate for improved access to community health care, and to professional organisations”.

Prof Baum told ABC Online, in an article on mental illness and poverty last month, that reducing levels of mental distress, and closing health inequalities, would require a rethinking of Australia’s direction as a society.

“I would have thought in the last 30 years, when rates of anxiety and depression have gone up in Western countries, there’s some clear clues from the economic system and society we’re creating.”

This system includes a dramatic rise in precarious and casualised work, a trend Prof Baum says could exacerbate pressures of powerlessness and poverty.

According to ABC Online she is writing a book on the subject of health inequality, and one of the unavoidable conclusions of her research is that health reform is political.

Her preliminary recommendations include reducing economic inequality, making public education free and available to all and providing more affordable and secure housing, to name a few.

Prof Baum holds grants from the National Health & Medical Research Council and the Australia Research Council which are considering a wide range of aspects of health inequities and social determinants of health.  These grants include an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence on Policies for Health Equity of which she is one of the two co-directors.

Her book, The New Public Health (4th ed. published January 2016 Oxford University Press), is widely cited and used in many public health courses.

Other speakers confirmed for the conference are:  Anne Bunde-Birouste, director of the UNSW Yunus Social Business for Health Hub; Dr Trevor Hancock, a public health physician and health promotion consultant from the University of Victoria, Canada; Patrick Mwesigye Sewa, founder and team leader at the Uganda Youth and Adolescents Health Forum; Colin Tukuitonga, Director General of the Pacific Community and Dr Stanley Vollant who practises  at the Notre-Dame community hospital in Montreal.

The IUHPE world conferences are renowned events for bringing together leading professionals in all corners of the world to take stock of the present state of knowledge and experiences, bring forward future challenges and shape the agenda to advance developments in health promotion.

Every three years, the conference defines the “state of the art” in health promotion practice, research, and theory.

The aim of the 2019 conference is to provide an unparalleled opportunity to link and demonstrate the contribution of health promotion to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and to acknowledge the way SDGs contribute to improvements in health and wellbeing.

To find out more please click here.

 

0

News

Registrations are open so get in quick for the chance to attend and boost your health promotion competency at the Pasifika Health Promotion Workshop in Auckland on June 15.

The Health Promotion Forum’s (HPF) workshop to be held at the MIT Pasifika Community Centre from 9.30am to 3.30pm will focus on the social determinants of health from a Pacific perspective.

The workshop will trace the history of Pacific health promotion in New Zealand and discuss how determinants of health can be addressed to produce health equity, wellbeing and success for Pacific peoples.

It aims to equip Pasifika health promoters and community leaders with the knowledge and tools to address the social determinants of health and work with the strengths, potentials and aspirations of Pasifika families and communities to take control of their health and wellbeing.

Course facilitator, Dr Viliami Puloka said although the course looked at how non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer impacted the wellbeing of the Pacific community the emphasis was not on sickness or disease but on the contributing factors.

Dr Puloka said being healthy was not just about the absence of sickness but about a complete sense of wellbeing.

“So the disease aspect will come in only as a result of what contributed to it. Physical health is just a bit of what makes you healthy. We are looking at health as a resource of living rather than a destination you arrive at,” he said.

“In this workshop we are looking beyond biology and genetics to social, cultural and economic factors that prevent us from achieving optimum health and wellbeing. Many of these social factors are beyond the control of individuals and their families. Together we will explore ways to deal with these issues in our everyday living.”

The workshop is primarily designed for health workers working with Pacific communities. Pacific community leaders and non-Pacific health workers who are working with Pacific communities are encouraged to join the workshop.

If you would like to attend please click here to complete the online registration form.

Contact Emma Frost for further information on emma@hauora.co.nz or 09 300 3734

Dr Puloka is HPF’s Senior Health Promotion Strategist specialising in Pacific Health Promotion. For more on Dr Puloka click here.

0

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
ErrorHere